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Book part
Publication date: 20 October 2015

Michael Preece

This research explores perceptions of knowledge management processes held by managers and employees in a service industry. To date, empirical research on knowledge…

Abstract

This research explores perceptions of knowledge management processes held by managers and employees in a service industry. To date, empirical research on knowledge management in the service industry is sparse. This research seeks to examine absorptive capacity and its four capabilities of acquisition, assimilation, transformation and exploitation and their impact on effective knowledge management. All of these capabilities are strategies that enable external knowledge to be recognized, imported and integrated into, and further developed within the organization effectively. The research tests the relationships between absorptive capacity and effective knowledge management through analysis of quantitative data (n = 549) drawn from managers and employees in 35 residential aged care organizations in Western Australia. Responses were analysed using Partial Least Square-based Structural Equation Modelling. Additional analysis was conducted to assess if the job role (of manager or employee) and three industry context variables of profit motive, size of business and length of time the organization has been in business, impacted on the hypothesized relationships.

Structural model analysis examines the relationships between variables as hypothesized in the research framework. Analysis found that absorptive capacity and the four capabilities correlated significantly with effective knowledge management, with absorptive capacity explaining 56% of the total variability for effective knowledge management. Findings from this research also show that absorptive capacity and the four capabilities provide a useful framework for examining knowledge management in the service industry. Additionally, there were no significant differences in the perceptions held between managers and employees, nor between respondents in for-profit and not-for-profit organizations. Furthermore, the size of the organization and length of time the organization has been in business did not impact on absorptive capacity, the four capabilities and effective knowledge management.

The research considers implications for business in light of these findings. The role of managers in providing leadership across the knowledge management process was confirmed, as well as the importance of guiding routines and knowledge sharing throughout the organization. Further, the results indicate that within the participating organizations there are discernible differences in the way that some organizations manage their knowledge, compared to others. To achieve effective knowledge management, managers need to provide a supportive workplace culture, facilitate strong employee relationships, encourage employees to seek out new knowledge, continually engage in two-way communication with employees and provide up-to-date policies and procedures that guide employees in doing their work. The implementation of knowledge management strategies has also been shown in this research to enhance the delivery and quality of residential aged care.

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Sustaining Competitive Advantage Via Business Intelligence, Knowledge Management, and System Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-707-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1992

Michael Wood and David Preece

Quality measurements and techniques ‐ for example SPC ‐ can play an important role in achieving high levels of quality. However, in practice, the methods sometimes fail to…

Abstract

Quality measurements and techniques ‐ for example SPC ‐ can play an important role in achieving high levels of quality. However, in practice, the methods sometimes fail to deliver the expected benefits, for a variety of human and organizational reasons. Draws on three case studies to explore some of these practical problems. Concludes by making a number of suggestions for improving the effectiveness of quality measurements in organizations.

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International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 9 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Book part
Publication date: 20 October 2015

Mohammed Quaddus and Arch G. Woodside

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Sustaining Competitive Advantage Via Business Intelligence, Knowledge Management, and System Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-707-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Linda S. Franck, Emma Pendleton, Barbara Pittam, Michael Preece and Al Aynsley‐Green

The oversight of clinical research in the UK is currently in a state of flux. Discusses the quality assurance problems that have arisen in the management of research and…

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Abstract

The oversight of clinical research in the UK is currently in a state of flux. Discusses the quality assurance problems that have arisen in the management of research and the protection of the rights of human participants. Contrasts clinical governance and regulatory approaches to research quality assurance and performs a critical analysis of the Department of Health (England) Research Governance Framework (RGF) to see where it falls within the continuum. Highlights the implications for UK hospitals engaged in clinical research through the presentation of a case study in implementing the RGF. Concludes by suggesting the priority areas that need to be addressed and invites further debate regarding the merits of a clinical governance or regulatory approach to research quality assurance.

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International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Book part
Publication date: 20 October 2015

Abstract

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Sustaining Competitive Advantage Via Business Intelligence, Knowledge Management, and System Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-707-3

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Book part
Publication date: 25 January 2021

Chloe Preece and Finola Kerrigan

In this chapter, we focus on the three examples of ‘destructive’ art by contemporary artists Ai Weiwei, Michael Landy and Banksy to unpack issues of dematerialisation. By…

Abstract

In this chapter, we focus on the three examples of ‘destructive’ art by contemporary artists Ai Weiwei, Michael Landy and Banksy to unpack issues of dematerialisation. By adopting the lens of object-oriented ontology, we reveal the hidden agency of artworks as objects. We find that artworks are charismatic objects that are alive to infinite possibilities and interpretations. As this meaning changes over time, we argue that any attempt at measuring or pinpointing cultural value is bound to fail. Instead, we suggest a need for further consideration of how art can operate as a hypo-object, presenting us with new perspectives on the world.

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Exploring Cultural Value
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-515-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

David A. Preece and Michael R. Harrison

Two recent empirical studies of new technology adoption, one focusing on employee resourcing aspects and the other on employee relations, have concluded as follows: in…

Abstract

Two recent empirical studies of new technology adoption, one focusing on employee resourcing aspects and the other on employee relations, have concluded as follows: in many instances, it may well be “that on balance it is employment policies that are more likely to determine the way in which technological change is implemented” (rather than the other way around); and “it is more sensible to talk of the impact of industrial relations on technological change than the reverse…”. These findings are supportive of the work of Buchanan and Boddy, who have argued that “the changes to structure that accompany technological change reflect strongly and directly the expectations and objectives of management, and weakly and indirectly the characteristics of the technology”. We broadly concur with these views, and, given that there is potentially a good deal of space within which managers and others can decide and act when new technology is adopted, we focus on the part that personnel specialists have played here, on the basis of case studies both authors have conducted of new technology adoption and implementation. But first, we need to review what the relevant social science literature can tell us about this matter.

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Personnel Review, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

T.D.A. Cosker, S. Elsayed, P. Michael and M. Preece

Day surgery is now a major element of surgical practice. The paper aims to examine if those patients undergoing day surgery from in‐patient wards receive the same standard…

Abstract

Purpose

Day surgery is now a major element of surgical practice. The paper aims to examine if those patients undergoing day surgery from in‐patient wards receive the same standard of care as those attending a formal day case surgical unit (DCSU), which is important.

Design/methodology/approach

Two cohorts of 50 consecutive patients undergoing day surgery either on an in‐patient ward or in the DCSU were asked about the pre‐operative checks that had been made in relation to their safe discharge.

Findings

Confirmation by in‐patient ward staff of safety issues outlined in guidelines published by the Royal College of Surgeons of England was variable. Of particular concern was that at least two of the recommendations relate to important safety issues such as driving a motor vehicle.

Originality/value

This paper is of use because ensuring that patients fulfil the Royal College's guidelines for day case surgery is important, no matter what surgery the patient undergoes. Patient safety may be compromised by failing to verify that patients are being discharged into a safe environment.

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Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2011

Danielle Mihram and G. Arthur Mihram

This paper seeks to report on six Symposia offered at the 2011 Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), held 17‐21 February 2011…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to report on six Symposia offered at the 2011 Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), held 17‐21 February 2011 in Washington, DC. This 177th Meeting's theme was “Science without Borders.”

Design/methodology/approach

The report for each symposium includes internet links and bibliographic citations leading to information that further supports and enriches the information provided in the speakers' presentations.

Findings

An enhanced report was presented for each presentation for each symposium.

Originality/value

Several symposia, relating to: global collaboration; the digitization of science; publications without borders; and, teaching, learning, and research in the digital age, are covered in this report. The paper provides a documented insight on the most recent advances in research described by each symposium's presenter.

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Library Hi Tech News, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2007

Paul Iles and Michael Macaulay

This article looks at the role of leadership development in the ethical leadership of English local government. Since the development of the ethical framework with the…

Abstract

This article looks at the role of leadership development in the ethical leadership of English local government. Since the development of the ethical framework with the Local Government Act 2000 leadership has been seen to be increasingly important, although comparatively little consideration has been given to what this actually means in practice. This article seeks to investigate the situation in a number of ways. It will discuss the distinction between ‘ethics leadership’ and ‘ethical leadership’ and argue that the two are connected: leadership is both an external role and an internalised process. We will then argue that the ethics framework has created a new community of practice in which leadership is exercised by a relatively large group of stakeholders. In so doing, we will identify both members of the broader ethical community and also members of the internal ethical community: ie. those stakeholders within any given local authority. Different aspects of leadership and leadership development (LD) will then be investigated in relation to ethics as a community of practice and a model is presented that illustrates the modes of ethical leadership development.

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International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

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