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Michael P. Lerman, Timothy P. Munyon and Jon C. Carr

Although scholarly inquiry into entrepreneurial stress has existed for nearly 40 years, little is known about how events drive stress responses in entrepreneurs, and how…

Abstract

Although scholarly inquiry into entrepreneurial stress has existed for nearly 40 years, little is known about how events drive stress responses in entrepreneurs, and how entrepreneur coping responses impact their well-being, relationships, and venture performance. In response to these deficiencies, the authors propose a stress events theory (SET) which they apply to an entrepreneurial context. The authors begin by providing a brief review of existing literature on entrepreneurial stress, which highlights unique stressors and events that entrepreneurs encounter. The authors then introduce event systems theory as developed by Morgeson, Mitchell, and Liu (2015). From this foundation, the authors develop SET, which describes how entrepreneurs react to particular event characteristics (novelty, disruptiveness, criticality, and duration). Additionally, the authors propose that how entrepreneurs interpret events drives coping choices, and that the accuracy of these coping choices subsequently differentiates the quality of entrepreneur well-being, interpersonal relationships, and venture-related consequences. The authors conclude with a discussion of contributions and areas of future research using our proposed theory.

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Entrepreneurial and Small Business Stressors, Experienced Stress, and Well-Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-397-8

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Entrepreneurial and Small Business Stressors, Experienced Stress, and Well-Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-397-8

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Article

Michael A. Callow and Dawn B. Lerman

Today’s consumers are becoming increasingly exposed to foreign markets through travel or via the Internet. They are facing new challenges in these less familiar shopping…

Abstract

Today’s consumers are becoming increasingly exposed to foreign markets through travel or via the Internet. They are facing new challenges in these less familiar shopping environments. One such challenge is the comparison of prices in a foreign currency. This issue is addressed by examining how consumers from different countries evaluate such price discounts. Hypotheses are developed regarding the impact of currency denomination familiarity on consumers’ attitudinal response to changes in prices. The results of an experimental study conducted in Italy and the USA support the proposition that consumers who are more familiar with the foreign currency’s denomination will be more influenced by price differentials than those consumers who are less familiar with the foreign currency’s denomination. The implications of the findings for pricing strategies in regional trade zones, international tourism, and global e‐marketing are discussed.

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Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Access to Destinations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-044678-3

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Transportation and Traffic Theory in the 21st Century
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-080-43926-6

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Transportation and Traffic Theory in the 21st Century
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-080-43926-6

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Handbook of Microsimulation Modelling
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-570-8

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Article

Michael J. Gundlach, Mark J. Martinko and Scott C. Douglas

Self‐efficacy has been described as a malleable quality based on individual perceptions of ability in given situations and has repetitively been linked to performance…

Abstract

Self‐efficacy has been described as a malleable quality based on individual perceptions of ability in given situations and has repetitively been linked to performance gains and other positive organizational outcomes. Less research has addressed the processes that shape individual efficacy levels. This article explores the role of emotional intelligence and causal reasoning patterns in the development of self‐efficacy beliefs. A research model is forwarded along with associated propositions. Lastly, the implications, limitations, and future research directions of this research are discussed.

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The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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The Creation and Analysis of Employer-Employee Matched Data
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44450-256-8

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Handbook of Transport Modelling
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-045376-7

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