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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2017

Michael Little

The purpose of this paper is to explore the aspects of social work for children, primarily in England.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the aspects of social work for children, primarily in England.

Design/methodology/approach

It is based on reflections on research undertaken by the author prior to 1995 and after 2015.

Findings

The paper explores the interaction between people – effective leaders and practitioners – and systems.

Research limitations/implications

It is an opinion piece, and does not present findings from a single study.

Practical implications

It urges systems that do not restrict the capability of practitioners.

Social implications

The value of social work services at times of significant social disadvantage demands strong public policy attention.

Originality/value

The study draws on several research and case studies in over 20 English local authorities

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 12 no. 2-3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 September 2017

Clare Chamberlain and Michael Little

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on development in children’s social work over 35 years from the perspective of someone who has worked in the field as a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on development in children’s social work over 35 years from the perspective of someone who has worked in the field as a practitioner and director.

Design/methodology/approach

Interview.

Findings

The paper provides insights into implementing the Reclaiming Social Work model and how systems can better support social work practice with children and families.

Originality/value

The paper offers a unique perspective on developments in the field and implications for the future of children’s social work.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 12 no. 2-3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

Heiko de B. Wijnholds and Michael W. Little

One‐stop financial shopping at major retailers has so far proved to be less of a boon than was expected. Early consumer studies point to problems with consumer acceptance…

Abstract

One‐stop financial shopping at major retailers has so far proved to be less of a boon than was expected. Early consumer studies point to problems with consumer acceptance, customer satisfaction, market segments, and marketing programs. There is no denying the existence of tantalizing opportunities, but most providers have failed to capitalize on these possibilities. The authors suggest that such firms adopt a different approach. The best approach for surmounting these problems and capitalizing on the existing opportunities is (1) proper market segmentation, (2) target marketing, and (3) well‐suited marketing strategies. Nontraditional providers should stop trying to be all things to all customers; they should be more selective and precise in their offerings. More specifically, findings indicate: 1. Consumers who feel comfortable shopping one‐stop financial services do so conditionally. The major retailers' lack of expertise in financial services and the questionable ability of personnel are primary areas of concern. 2. The relatively small segment of consumers who feel comfortable shopping for financial services offered by retailers prefer the convenience of the one‐stop service. Also these consumers accept favorably the national retail chains because of their established reputations. 3. Retailers offering financial services have had problems in identifying target markets and developing satisfied and repeat customers. Nevertheless, opportunities do exist if cross‐selling of present offerings to selected markets can be further cultivated.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Book part
Publication date: 18 December 2016

Stephanie A. Peak, Emily J. Hanson, Fade R. Eadeh and Alan J. Lambert

In a diverse society, empathy would intuitively seem to represent a powerful force for social good. In particular, we expect empathic people to tolerate (rather than…

Abstract

In a diverse society, empathy would intuitively seem to represent a powerful force for social good. In particular, we expect empathic people to tolerate (rather than reject) attitudes that might be different from their own, and to resolve and/or avoid (rather than escalate) potential disagreements with others. Some research supports this benign view of empathy, but somewhat surprisingly, there is a “dark” side to empathy, one that can sometimes exacerbate attitudinal conflict. That is, empathy can often be parochial, in the sense that people are inclined to reserve their compassion for others only when they are deemed to be worthy of such support. In this chapter we review classic and contemporary research on the light and dark side of empathy, and consider its implications for the kinds of dynamics that could potentially emerge when people encounter people and ideas that are different from their own.

Details

The Crisis of Race in Higher Education: A Day of Discovery and Dialogue
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-710-6

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 September 2017

David Shemmings and Michael Little

947

Abstract

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 12 no. 2-3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Article
Publication date: 31 December 2007

Michael H. Dickey, D. Harrison McKnight and Joey F. George

This study aims to examine how two types of trust affect five key franchisee attitudes/behaviors within a setting where franchisees have strong contractual ties to the…

2308

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how two types of trust affect five key franchisee attitudes/behaviors within a setting where franchisees have strong contractual ties to the franchisor. The five attitudes/behaviors are: identification and satisfaction with the franchisor, compliance and non‐compliance with franchisor directives, and perceived relationship quality. These attitudes/behaviors were chosen because research has found each to affect franchise performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The model in the paper features two trusting beliefs that influence attitudes/behaviors. The study gathers US franchisee questionnaire data then analyzes the model using partial least squares techniques.

Findings

Trusting belief‐competence was found to reduce non‐compliance with the franchisor, and also increase identification with the franchisor. Both trusting belief‐competence and trusting belief‐honesty were found to enhance satisfaction with the franchisor and perceived relationship quality. Neither of these two trusting beliefs was found to influence compliance with franchisor directives. Perceived mutual commitment appears to strongly influence both trusting beliefs, whereas length of time as a franchisee does not.

Research limitations/implications

The findings support relational contracting theory, showing that even within a contract, trust exerts a significant influence on vital franchisee attitudes. Other research shows these attitudes/behaviors influence franchise performance, though the present study does not measure performance.

Practical implications

The results suggest franchisee trust is key to the ongoing franchise relationship. Hence, franchisors should try to build franchisee trust. They can do so by enhancing mutual commitment and by supplying well‐conceived new products and marketing campaigns.

Originality/value

This study clearly shows the value of franchisee trust and suggests several ways to build it.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 19 September 2016

Michael Little and Georgina Warner

183

Abstract

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Content available
Article
Publication date: 29 November 2013

Nick Axford and Michael Little

149

Abstract

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 September 2014

Nick Axford and Michael Little

126

Abstract

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Book part
Publication date: 16 September 2014

Abstract

Details

Production, Consumption, Business and the Economy: Structural Ideals and Moral Realities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-055-1

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