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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

John A. Parnell, Donald L. Lester and Michael L. Menefee

Much of the literature suggests that strategies are formulated in light of perceived environmental conditions and internal capabilities. This study supports the notion…

Abstract

Much of the literature suggests that strategies are formulated in light of perceived environmental conditions and internal capabilities. This study supports the notion that strategy is formulated in part as a response to management uncertainties about competitors, customers, and the environment. Responses from 137 wholesale grocers demonstrate that uncertainty varies by generic strategy, suggesting that businesses consider both the type and degree of uncertainty when crafting a competitive strategy. Specifically, the data suggest that viable strategic options may be limited more by the cognitive and perceptual abilities of an organization’s managers than by objective measures of factors such as organizational resources and industry competitiveness. The premise that strategy must “fit” with organizational or environmental factors to be effective may be incomplete. Rather, a strategy – to be successful – should also fit with the psychological characteristics and constraints of the managers responsible for its formulation and implementation.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 38 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2008

Donald L. Lester, John A. Parnell, William “Rick” Crandall and Michael L. Menefee

This exploratory study seeks to bridge a gap in the literature by exploring the life cycle‐strategy relationship to discover the preferred strategy for high and low…

Abstract

Purpose

This exploratory study seeks to bridge a gap in the literature by exploring the life cycle‐strategy relationship to discover the preferred strategy for high and low performing firms in four of the five stages of the organizational life cycle.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 600 managers randomly chosen from chamber of commerce membership lists in the southern USA were mailed an extensive scale that included items to measure life cycle stage, generic strategy, industry attractiveness and stability, size, and satisfaction with performance. The instrument included 20 life‐cycle items, four items for each of the five stages.

Findings

Partial support was found for the expected relationship between strategy and performance as firms move through the organizational life cycle. New, high‐performing organizations that were satisfied with their performance preferred first mover strategies, while renewing organizations categorized as high performers also emphasized the first mover strategic approach. Mature high performers preferred a uniqueness strategy over one based on efficiency.

Research limitations/implications

The fifth proposition, concerning declining firms, could not be adequately tested. Other limitations of this study include the limited sample size, the limited size variance of participating firms, and the cross‐industry nature of the sample. Combining the research stream of organizational life cycle with generic strategies and satisfaction with performance complicated the project.

Practical implications

Life cycle and performance research provides managers with a snapshot of high and low performing firms and an understanding of how their situation, decision‐making style, strategy and structure fit. High performers focus on proactive, first mover strategies.

Originality/value

The organizational life cycle is operationalized, demonstrating characteristics for high and low performing firms in each stage except decline.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2015

Claudio M Rocha and Janet S Fink

The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of patriotism and identification with national players on identification with the NBA and, ultimately, with…

Abstract

The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of patriotism and identification with national players on identification with the NBA and, ultimately, with purchase intentions of league-related merchandise. Findings revealed that the interaction between patriotism and identification with national players was a significant predictor of identification with NBA, which in turn was a significant predictor of purchase intentions of league-related products. The moderated mediation model fit the data quite well and explained 44.5% of the variance in purchase intentions. Theoretical implications of the findings, as well as practical implications for sports managers, are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 14 March 2017

Kenneth M. Moffett

Abstract

Details

Forming and Centering
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-829-5

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Book part
Publication date: 30 July 1993

Abstract

Details

Contingent Valuation: A Critical Assessment
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-860-5

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Book part
Publication date: 14 March 2017

Kenneth M. Moffett

Abstract

Details

Forming and Centering
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-829-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Leslie T. Szamosi

The paper seeks to determine what tomorrow's employees (i.e. graduates) are seeking from SMEs in terms of organizational satisfaction and value characteristics.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to determine what tomorrow's employees (i.e. graduates) are seeking from SMEs in terms of organizational satisfaction and value characteristics.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 55 university students who identified SMEs as their best opportunity for their career goals is shown. The survey utilized tested measures of organizational satisfaction and values.

Findings

The paper finds that Generations X and Y are seeking equivalent values and satisfaction outcomes from SMEs. It is seeking very caring, environmentally concerned, and sensitive SMEs. Tangible and intangible benefits, empowerment and respect, workplace involvement, concern for employee welfare and supportive management are critical.

Research limitations/implications

The paper shows that when researching one can differentiate between what graduates are looking for from their SMEs as opposed to organizations in general. Future research could analyze SME versus MNC or other organizational forms.

Practical implications

The paper implies that in the recruiting process SMEs need to focus on various outcomes that graduates seek in order to attract and retain the best potential employees. There appears to be little need to tailor the workplace for Generations X versus Y.

Originality/value

A series of outcome variables has been specifically identified for graduates who want to work in SMEs.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 48 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2012

Michael Chih‐Hung Wang, Megha Jain, Julian Ming‐Sung Cheng and George Kyaw‐Myo Aung

The purpose of this paper is to empirically verify the conventional cause‐and‐effect relationship of fan identification and purchase intention in the context of Asian fans…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically verify the conventional cause‐and‐effect relationship of fan identification and purchase intention in the context of Asian fans when both the sponsoring firm and the sponsored team are Western. The paper also proposes and examines the mediating role of sponsor credibility and attitude towards sponsor in the relationship between fan identification and purchase intention.

Design/methodology/approach

A field study was conducted in Bangkok, Thailand, where 350 questionnaires were collected from football fans.

Findings

The findings reveal that, even when both the sponsoring firm and the sponsored sports team are western (i.e. foreign), Asian fans’ identification with the team increases their purchase intention for sponsoring firm's goods. The research also confirms that sponsor credibility and attitude towards sponsors partially mediate the fan identification‐purchase link.

Originality/value

The paper provides valuable insights into the under‐researched aspect of sports sponsorship, by examining the effect on Asian fans’ purchase intension when both the sponsoring firm and the sponsored sports team are western. Moreover, most of the prior literature on sports sponsorship focuses on the direct effect of fan identification on purchase intention. The current study extends the scope of knowledge on sports sponsorship by focusing on the under‐researched but crucial mediating effects of sponsor credibility and attitude towards sponsor.

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

Feng Yang and Minghong Yang

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the efficiency of public goods provision in Wenchuan earthquake-stricken rural areas. The study was undertaken in August and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the efficiency of public goods provision in Wenchuan earthquake-stricken rural areas. The study was undertaken in August and September 2012 by the field survey of 24 villages.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper, by applying the methods of analytic hierarchy process and fuzzy comprehensive evaluation, aims to evaluate the efficiency by means of villagers’ satisfaction, which is designed in the idea of combining overall goal-classifications and specific indicators, including 7 classifications and a total of 36 specific indicators.

Findings

Based on maximum membership principle by the fuzzy comprehensive evaluation, the calculation results in 0.4485862 as a “general” level of the evaluation membership of efficiency in the post-quake public goods provision, and 3.0634837 as overall comprehensive score, a level lower than 3.5.

Practical implications

The efficiency by means of villagers’ evaluation is generally at a lower degree. Although the reconstruction has completed some high-quality infrastructure, schools, hospitals and houses, we still face more macroscopic and long-term problems of recovering and sustaining the post-quake communities in many fields.

Originality/value

It is more worthy to consider how to improve the efficiency of the reconstruction, especially in public goods and public services provision in the quake-stricken rural areas.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2020

Ellen Belitzky, Christian Bach and Erika Belitzky

This study aims to understand how healthcare social media offer nonmedical psycho-social support for pediatric oncology patients and their care community and how social…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to understand how healthcare social media offer nonmedical psycho-social support for pediatric oncology patients and their care community and how social media can be exploited for healthcare knowledge management.

Design/methodology/approach

Social media capabilities were identified and categorized based on psycho-social support services for pediatric oncology patients, caregivers and their community of care. Data were collected from 187 service sites representing more than 100 organizations. These broadly defined capabilities in trusted care organizations were analyzed to understand use of social media in providing psycho-social support.

Findings

Analysis revealed resource guides, stories and in-person support at clinics as the most prevalent forms of technology-guided psycho-social support. Privacy, security and information integrity rose as technical challenges for interactive social media platforms. Medical community trust is inconsistent, leading to immature adoption of critical psycho-social support as a knowledge management source. Findings further indicate the not-for-profit support sector provides robust social media capabilities compared to the healthcare sector.

Research limitations/implications

Future research may extend to maturing healthcare and not-for-profit sector services and to private sector products such as mobile applications and other technologies.

Practical implications

Survivor and caregiver quality of life depend on psycho-social support communities and services delivered via social media.

Social implications

Child protection social implications require significant attention due to sensitivity of security, privacy concerns and longevity of digital footprints for pediatric patients.

Originality/value

Research demonstrates opportunity for medical provider, healthcare organization, not-for-profit sector, patient and caregiver cooperation using social media. Data indicate healthcare technology systems leveraging social media can extend knowledge management capability beyond organization boundaries.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Keywords

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