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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

Natasha Mauthner, Michael Killoran‐Ross and Jane Brown

This article reports on a literature review of interventions specifically identified as emanating from a mental health promotion (as opposed to prevention) paradigm. A…

Abstract

This article reports on a literature review of interventions specifically identified as emanating from a mental health promotion (as opposed to prevention) paradigm. A number of recurring debates in the field were identified, including language and terminology, defining ‘mental health’, models of mental health promotion, the use of overgeneralised concepts, values, beliefs and assumptions implicit in mental health promotion interventions, and diversity in what gets called mental health promotion and who does mental health promotion. The paper concludes by highlighting key issues critical to the future development of mental health promotion: the implications of mental health promotion being at an embryonic stage of development, the need for greater reflexivity, the need for integration, and issues concerning professional identity and practice in the mental health promotion field.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2011

Michael Killoran Ross and Pauline Craig

This paper aims to describe the development activity undertaken by a primary care mental team and public health specialists in Glasgow aimed at expanding the capacity of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the development activity undertaken by a primary care mental team and public health specialists in Glasgow aimed at expanding the capacity of the primary care team to tackle health inequalities in the local area.

Design/methodology/approach

In association with the Glasgow Centre for Population Health (GCPH), a partnership between National Health Service Greater Glasgow and Clyde, Glasgow University, Glasgow City Council and the Scottish Government, work was undertaken to address inequalities within mental health in the context of service provision.

Findings

In an attempt to progress work on inequalities, a suitable model was required and the approach offered by the GCPH was a valuable starting point. Through a systematic consideration of available approaches, and the baseline position, it was possible to begin to reflect on potential interventions, and to consider ways in which outcomes could be measured and reviewed. This process, which evolved in discussion within the team and senior management, became an important starting point for longer term action. It provided a means of beginning to grapple with the impact of inequalities on service provision, and was an important first step in prioritizing possible approaches.

Originality/value

The team is considering further collaboration with GCPH to explore how they might assess the extent of mental health and well‐being concerns in their population and the implications for future service development.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Natasha Mauthner and Michael Ross

Abstract

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

Michael Murray

Abstract

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Abstract

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Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2008

Neil Wilson, Michael Ross, Kevin Lafferty and Russell Jones

The concept of utilising greenspace to promote and maintain mental health predates the development of almost all current treatment modalities. Although the use of…

Abstract

The concept of utilising greenspace to promote and maintain mental health predates the development of almost all current treatment modalities. Although the use of greenspace as a therapeutic tool decreased throughout the 20th century, research in this area has grown exponentially over the last 20 years. This review examines the theory and increasing evidence base behind the psychological, social and physical health benefits of viewing and interacting with greenspace, and considers some of the common methodological limitations within the literature.Those who use secondary and tertiary care mental health services typically experience secondary problems due to reduced levels of social and physical activity. This review argues that the holistic benefits of greenspace make ecotherapy particularly appropriate for such a population. The review recommends that the effects of ecotherapy on those who use secondary and tertiary mental health care services be explored as part of an effort to redress the absence in the literature of quality studies in this area for this population.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1954

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Abstract

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1949

It has often been said that a great part of the strength of Aslib lies in the fact that it brings together those whose experience has been gained in many widely differing…

Abstract

It has often been said that a great part of the strength of Aslib lies in the fact that it brings together those whose experience has been gained in many widely differing fields but who have a common interest in the means by which information may be collected and disseminated to the greatest advantage. Lists of its members have, therefore, a more than ordinary value since they present, in miniature, a cross‐section of institutions and individuals who share this special interest.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Michael P. Kelly and Catherine Swann

This study focuses on the idea of an evidence‐based approach to medical problems, which has been in existence for more than 30 years. This idea of carrying systematic…

Abstract

This study focuses on the idea of an evidence‐based approach to medical problems, which has been in existence for more than 30 years. This idea of carrying systematic knowledge into practice in public health has recently become part of the present government's drive to modernisation and improved delivery. The study outlines the work of the Health Development Agency (HDA), which has the task of both assembling the public health evidence and obtaining evidence of effectiveness of public health interventions into practice. The underlying purpose is to get evidence together which would help to reduce inequalities in health. A number of lessons in this activity are described.

Details

Health Education, vol. 104 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Book part
Publication date: 17 May 2012

Martyn Hammersley

Assigning or claiming identities can be a dangerous business. Labels carry conflicting meanings and, even more importantly, what is a laudatory term to some will be…

Abstract

Assigning or claiming identities can be a dangerous business. Labels carry conflicting meanings and, even more importantly, what is a laudatory term to some will be grounds for condemnation by others. My immediate response to the invitation to write this piece about becoming a symbolic interactionist, aside from the pleasure of being asked, was that I was not sure that I could claim, or even that I would want to claim, this label. I have a visceral dislike of theoretical-cum-methodological camps, not least because over the years I have been accused of belonging to a variety of these, from positivism to post-modernism. Reflecting a little more on the invitation, however, I realized that I could not reasonably deny that in the past, particularly in the 1970s, I regarded myself and was seen by others as an interactionist. Moreover, while my ideas about sociological work are now somewhat different from what they were then, and the direction of travel might be viewed as ‘un-interactionist’, in fact much of my work is still focused on issues coming out of the interactionist tradition: notably, Blumer's views about methodology, Becker's arguments about ‘Whose side are we on?’, and the notion of analytic induction.

Details

Blue-Ribbon Papers: Behind the Professional Mask: The Autobiographies of Leading Symbolic Interactionists
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-747-5

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