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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Hiba Bawadi, Reema Tayyem, Safaa Muhanna, Georgianna Tuuri, Michael J. Keenan, Moez Faris and Jack Losso

This study aims to assess the students’ stage of change (SOC) for fruits and vegetables (FV) consumption using the 5-a-day and 9-a-day patterns; to validate a tool to…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assess the students’ stage of change (SOC) for fruits and vegetables (FV) consumption using the 5-a-day and 9-a-day patterns; to validate a tool to measure SOC for consuming 5-a-day and 9-a-day of FV; and to investigate the relationship between SOC for FV consumption and body weight among Jordanian college students.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional study was conducted and included a convenient sample of 788 college students (47.7 per cent men and 52.2 per cent women) who completed validated questionnaires which included socio-demographic data, readiness to consume 5-a-day and 9-a-day servings of FV daily and FV consumption behaviors. Students’ heights and weights were measured. SOC for participants was examined using reparation, contemplation, pre-contemplation, action and maintenance stages.

Findings

A majority (69.9 per cent) of college students were in the pre-contemplation stage with regard to 9-a-day behavior. Females tended to be classified in the action stage more than males (P < 0.001). After controlling for age, gender and energy consumption, a significant (P < 0.05) inverse relationship was found between maintenance or action SOC for consuming 9-a-day behavior and body mass index (BMI). A large proportion of college students were in a pre-action stage for either consuming 5-a-day or 9-a-day of FV. Those students who followed the 9-a-day recommendations had significantly (P < 0.05) lower BMI values that those students in the pre-action stages.

Originality/value

The current study is genuine and original, and valuable in designing new strategies in lowering obesity and its comorbidities.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 47 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 October 2008

Michael Keenan and Rafael Popper

The paper sets out to explore the nature and degree of variation in foresight “style” across six world regions. The underlying hypothesis is that differences in regional

Abstract

Purpose

The paper sets out to explore the nature and degree of variation in foresight “style” across six world regions. The underlying hypothesis is that differences in regional context – in terms of political, socio‐economic, and cultural conditions – will affect foresight “style”. At the same time, a secondary hypothesis acknowledges that policy tool transfer and international learning might soften the influence of contextual conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the data collected for more than 800 foresight exercises in six world regions, the paper considers eight different dimensions of foresight “style”, including domain coverage, time horizon, target groups, and methods used. It interprets regional differences (and similarities) with reference to dominant political and economic traditions in each region. In so doing, it tests the hypothesis that foresight “style” is influenced by regional context.

Findings

The analysis suggests that some foresight “style” dimensions vary between regions more than others. For example, there is marked variation in the domain areas covered by foresight across the world, while some regions appear to prefer particular methods over others. Time horizons also vary. For other dimensions, such as participation levels and the identity of target groups, there is a good deal of similarity. Thus, some dimensions of “style”, at least at the aggregate level, seem to be more influenced by regional context than others.

Originality/value

The paper is unique in being the first publication to survey such a large sample of foresight activity across a wide part of the globe.

Details

Foresight, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 October 2008

Maurits Butter, Felix Brandes, Michael Keenan and Rafael Popper

This paper seeks to provide an introduction to the special issue of foresight, dedicated to the European Foresight Monitoring Network (EFMN).

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to provide an introduction to the special issue of foresight, dedicated to the European Foresight Monitoring Network (EFMN).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper sets out the project's rationale and its scope and approach.

Findings

The paper presents some of the achievements of the EFMN, as well as some of its limitations.

Originality/value

The paper considers how the EFMN might be sustained and further developed over the longer term. It also provides a brief description of the main papers in the special issue.

Details

Foresight, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Michael Keenan, Ozcan Saritas and Inga Kroener

The textiles and clothing sector employs millions of people in the European Union (EU) and has a combined annual turnover of more than €200 billion. Over the last decade…

Abstract

The textiles and clothing sector employs millions of people in the European Union (EU) and has a combined annual turnover of more than €200 billion. Over the last decade or so, more than a million jobs have been lost in the industry, partly through modernisation, but mainly as a result of international competition, especially from developing countries. This competition is set to intensify with the abolition of import quotas in 2005, leaving the EU industry facing an uncertain future. This article explores five key drivers that are likely to affect the sector profoundly over the coming decade. For each driver, three “outlooks” have been articulated: an extrapolation of current trends and drivers (“Alpha” outlook), a situation where many things “go wrong” (“Beta” outlook), and a situation involving more visionary outcomes (“Delta” outlook). The aim is not to forecast the future, but rather to explore plausible outcomes for the industry over the coming decade. On this basis, a number of policy areas have been identified where the European Commission (EC) and Member States will need to address future threats and opportunities.

Details

Foresight, vol. 6 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Ozcan Saritas and Michael Keenan

Despite differences in political approaches and institutional frameworks, health and social services in all European Union (EU) Member States face similar challenges…

Abstract

Despite differences in political approaches and institutional frameworks, health and social services in all European Union (EU) Member States face similar challenges, notably the need to adjust to demographic ageing and to changing employment and family patterns. This article takes a closer look at some of those issues (drivers) that are likely to have significant implications for the future of the sector. On this basis, three diverging “integrated visions” for health and social services are presented. The first vision is a “best guesstimate” and assumes that current developmental targets, for example, on reducing cardiovascular disease, are generally met. The second vision is a “problem‐plagued” view of health and social services, where targets are missed and the current level of service generally stays the same or deteriorates. Finally, the third vision presents a more “visionary” picture of health and social services where services are largely transformed from what is known today. All “integrated visions” have been constructed from existing health‐care scenarios as well as the drivers identified earlier. The paper is rounded off with an account of some of the policy measures being implemented by the European Commission and Member States in addressing several of the areas highlighted as important for the future of the sector.

Details

Foresight, vol. 6 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

Marcia Henry, Linda Keenan and Michael Reagan

This search sheet updates the 1991 Cleveland Public Library search sheet published in the first edition of Search Sheets for OPACs on the Internet. It updates only the…

Abstract

This search sheet updates the 1991 Cleveland Public Library search sheet published in the first edition of Search Sheets for OPACs on the Internet. It updates only the standard DRA commands. The keyword searching puts one in a different set of commands and requires a separate search sheet. There are several new commands, rel, t#, so, k, and a slight change in the I.P. address, 192.58.246.2. There are now menu prompts for limit if a search ends in a backward slash, for example: a=shakespeare\

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1994

Marcia Henry, Linda Keenan and Michael Reagan

The following Melvyl system search sheet updates the 1991 search sheet published in the first edition of Search Sheets for OPACs on the Internet. Although the first…

Abstract

The following Melvyl system search sheet updates the 1991 search sheet published in the first edition of Search Sheets for OPACs on the Internet. Although the first edition's search sheet is still very useable, it does not document some new features (e.g., Save Set, the Mail To, and Update commands) as well as the change in I.P. address. The Melvyl search sheet is the first of several revised search sheets to be published in CWIS. For example, there have been changes in the Harvard, Rensselaer, University of Illinois, and CARL search sheets to name just a few. The next edition of Search Sheets for OPACs on the Internet will have search sheets for over one hundred new OPACs not covered in the first edition. We hope to keep up with the changes in the OPACs of both editions in CWIS.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Article
Publication date: 15 October 2008

Rafael Popper

This paper addresses a challenging topic, which in both academic and professional literatures has been widely discussed but mainly from one single angle – that is, how to

Abstract

Purpose

This paper addresses a challenging topic, which in both academic and professional literatures has been widely discussed but mainly from one single angle – that is, how to select foresight methods. From that point of view researchers and consultants promote (even if unintentionally) the use of particular methods. Here the question of selection is raised from a different perspective: how are foresight methods selected?

Design/methodology/approach

The guiding “theory” is that a better understanding of the fundamental attributes of foresight methods and their linkages to the core phases of a foresight process, together with the identification of possible patterns in the selection of methods, will provide useful insights as to how the selection of methods is carried out.

Findings

So far the selection of foresight methods has been dominated by the intuition, insight, impulsiveness and – sometimes – inexperience or irresponsibility of practitioners and organisers. This paper reveals that the selection of foresight methods (even if not always coherent or systematic) is a multi‐factor process, and needs to be considered as such.

Practical implications

The results can be utilised by lecturers and students to describe and understand better the use of foresight methods, and by organisers of foresight (including practitioners) to better inform decisions during the design of (hopefully) more coherent methodological frameworks.

Originality/value

The paper combines practical concepts and frameworks (such as the Foresight Process and the Foresight Diamond) with innovative analyses to represent and visualise better the combination of methods in 886 case studies, for example introducing the Methods Combination Matrix (MCM) to examine the dynamics of a mix of methods.

Details

Foresight, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1997

Sonja Gallhofer, Jim Haslam and Steven Cahan

This paper reviews Pacific Accounting Review, 1988–96. Against the background of an historical overview of the journal's development, the paper includes analyses of…

Abstract

This paper reviews Pacific Accounting Review, 1988–96. Against the background of an historical overview of the journal's development, the paper includes analyses of publications and citations in the journal. The paper looks forward to the future progress of Pacific Accounting Review.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

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Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2012

Michael Keenan

Purpose – This chapter reflects on my research experiences as a heterosexual man interviewing gay clergy. The chapter focuses on the interviewer/interviewee relationship…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter reflects on my research experiences as a heterosexual man interviewing gay clergy. The chapter focuses on the interviewer/interviewee relationship reflecting on the place of similarity and difference in the research interaction.

Methodology/approach – The chapter reflects on my experiences of undertaking feminist inspired qualitative interviews on sensitive issues.

Findings – The chapter argues for a move beyond a binary understanding of similarity and difference and illustrates interviews as dynamic interactions.

Research limitations/implications – It is hoped that the reflections presented will inform future research in sensitive areas and encourage an open, engaged and reactive approach to interviewing around sensitive topics.

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