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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2020

Sehrish Shahid, Michael K. Muchiri and Fred O. Walumbwa

This paper aims to explore the antecedents and consequences of thriving at work, identifies existing gaps in the literature and proposes a framework, which encapsulates…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the antecedents and consequences of thriving at work, identifies existing gaps in the literature and proposes a framework, which encapsulates potential pathways for future research on thriving.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper follows a rigorous review of the extant literature on thriving mainly based on journal articles published between 2005 and 2020.

Findings

The paper proposes a feasible conceptual framework highlighting the antecedents and outcomes of thriving. Specifically, the review illustrates how contextual factors, represented by transformational leadership and organisational virtuousness (OV), act as antecedents of thriving and then proposes potential research direction where thriving is associated with psychological empowerment, psychological capital and innovative work behaviour.

Practical implications

Understanding how and when contextual factors such as transformational leadership and OV promote thriving is important for organisations and leaders who wish to know how and when they can shape resources and organisational features to enable thriving.

Originality/value

This unique review is one of a few studies adding to the growing research on positive psychology at the workplace. The proposed framework and future research directions have the potential to help unpack the unique relationship between work-related contextual factors and thriving.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 December 2018

Sehrish Shahid and Michael K. Muchiri

Recognising the value of positive organisational behaviour at the workplace, this paper aims to provide a major review of the current state of research on positivity, and…

Abstract

Purpose

Recognising the value of positive organisational behaviour at the workplace, this paper aims to provide a major review of the current state of research on positivity, and subsequently proposes new pathways for more theory building relating to important constructs conceptually related to positivity. Following the integration of emerging but disparate research on workplace positivity and related concepts, the paper develops a conceptual framework depicting the relationships amongst authentic leader behaviours, organisational virtuousness, psychological capital, thriving and job performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper offers a systematic critical review of published studies representing the literature addressing authentic leadership, organisational virtuousness, thriving, psychological capital and job performance. The paper relied on computerised keyword searches in the main business source databases of Emerald, ProQuest, ScienceDirect, EBSCOhost and SpringerLink.

Findings

This paper leads to a conceptual framework proposing direct relationships between authentic leadership, psychological capital, organisational virtuousness and job performance. Further, authentic leadership is proposed to potentially nurture organisational virtuousness, psychological capital, employee thriving and job performance, given the theoretical linkages between these conceptually relevant variables related to positivity. Additionally, organisational virtuousness and psychological capital are projected to mediate the relationship between authentic leadership and employee thriving. Finally, organisational virtuousness, psychological capital and employee thriving are designated as mediators of the relationship between authentic leadership and job performance.

Research limitations/implications

This paper proposes a conceptual framework focusing on one form of positive leader behaviour and also assumes specific causal pathways using a positivistic research approach to understanding the leadership–performance relationship. The paper did not examine all possible antecedents of positivity at the workplace.

Practical implications

The proposed conceptual framework should form the basis of many organisational interventions, especially in relation to boosting authentic leadership, organisational virtuousness, psychological capital, employee thriving and job performance. By suggesting the association between authentic leadership, psychological capital and organisational virtuousness, this paper highlights potential benefits from effective leaders’ commitment to enhancing psychological capital and organisational virtuousness and engendering thriving behaviour and job performance.

Originality/value

This novel paper has the potential to stimulate the empirical studies on workplace positivity through the association of authentic leadership, psychological capital, organisational virtuousness and thriving.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2012

Michael K. Muchiri, Ray W. Cooksey and Fred O. Walumbwa

The purpose of this paper is to examine the separate and combined effects of transformational leadership behaviour and social processes of leadership on key organisational…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the separate and combined effects of transformational leadership behaviour and social processes of leadership on key organisational outcomes within Australian local councils.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey research methodology was used to gather quantitative data from employees from nine local councils. Data were analysed using Item clustering analysis for scale construction. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was employed to test the proposed conceptual framework.

Findings

It was found that transformational leadership predicted performance outcomes, collective efficacy/outcomes expectancies and organisational commitment. Social processes of leadership predicted performance outcomes, collective efficacy/outcomes expectancies and organisational citizenship behaviours.

Practical implications

Results indicate that by practising aspects of transformational leadership such as articulating clear standards and expectations for performance and showing recognition to work unit members for specific task or goal achievements, work unit leaders may establish a foundation that later leads to higher performance outcomes. Furthermore, promoting aspects of social processes of leadership such as communication, enhancing adaptability and resolving uncertainties may lead to greater clarification and subsequent higher performance outcomes.

Originality/value

The paper is one of the first to examine the separate and combined effects of transformational leadership behaviour and social processes of leadership on key organisational outcomes in Australian local councils.

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2013

Michael K. Muchiri and Oluremi B. Ayoko

This paper aimed to explore the direct and indirect effects of demographic diversity variables on citizenship behaviours, affective commitment, collective efficacy and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aimed to explore the direct and indirect effects of demographic diversity variables on citizenship behaviours, affective commitment, collective efficacy and general productivity.

Design/methodology/approach

A self‐report questionnaire was used to gather data from employees in the public sector (local government) of Australia.

Findings

Results of the hierarchical regression analyses showed direct and significant relationships between certain demographic diversity variables and several criterion variables. Moving from non‐management to management level was predictive of an increase in organisational citizenship behaviours and affective commitment. Additionally, an increase in tenure within a work unit was predictive of general productivity. Conversely, an increase in organisational tenure was predictive of a decrease in general productivity. Also, an increase in women in a work unit was predictive of a decrease in organisational citizenship behaviours, collective efficacy beliefs and general productivity. Furthermore, an increase in men in a work unit was predictive of a decrease in organisational citizenship behaviours, collective efficacy beliefs and general productivity. Moderated regression analyses indicated that transformational leadership moderated relationships between organisational tenure and organisational citizenship behaviours as well as organisational tenure and general productivity. Finally, transformational leadership moderated relationships between women in work unit and organisational citizenship behaviours, and women in work unit and general productivity.

Research limitations/implications

The authors gathered cross‐sectional data for their research while both of their leadership and performance data were based on participants’ self‐reports. Future research should gather data from multiple sources and employ longitudinal and experimental designs to explore the link between demographic diversity, leadership and organisational outcomes.

Practical implications

Based on the current results, managers need to understand and nurture task‐related demographic diversity (such as gender composition of a workgroup, non‐management vs management level, and tenure in work unit) shown to be positively related to citizenship behaviours, affective commitment and general productivity. Furthermore, organisations should put in place human resource management programs which actively promote transformational leadership in order to lessen or neutralise possible negative effects of demographic diversity on relevant organisational outcomes.

Originality/value

This empirical study adds to the growing research findings regarding the relationship between demographic diversity variables and various organisational outcomes using data from the public sector of Australia.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2011

Michael K. Muchiri and Ray W. Cooksey

This paper aims to examine the direct and indirect effects of substitutes for leadership on performance outcomes.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the direct and indirect effects of substitutes for leadership on performance outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

A self‐report questionnaire was distributed to a sample of 177 Australian local council employees. The responses were analysed using ICLUST analysis and hierarchical multiple regression analysis.

Findings

The results indicated significant positive effects of some substitutes for leadership on performance outcomes. Furthermore, some substitutes for leadership moderated the effects of transactional leadership behaviours on performance outcomes, whereas another sub‐component of substitutes for leadership moderated the effects of social processes of leadership on performance outcomes. In addition, some substitutes for leadership partially mediated the relationship between transformational leadership and performance outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

The cross‐sectional design of the study reduces the capacity to draw definitive causal inferences.

Practical implications

The current study supports the view that council leaders could have influenced the employees' attitudes, perceptions, and performance by indirectly shaping the environment in which the subordinates worked (i.e. shaping task and organisational characteristics). The study implies the need for leaders in the local councils to understand those substitutes for leadership that mediate the influence of transformational leadership (such as group and work design capacities) and how they can be managed to enhance employee performance outcomes.

Originality/value

This is one of the first Australian studies to comprehensively examine the influence of substitutes for leadership on performance outcomes.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2011

Michael K. Muchiri, Ray W. Cooksey, Lee V. Di Milia and Fred O. Walumbwa

This paper seeks to examine gender‐ and management‐ level differences in perceptions of effective leadership within a framework of new leadership models that focus on the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to examine gender‐ and management‐ level differences in perceptions of effective leadership within a framework of new leadership models that focus on the processes of influencing self and others rather than leadership based on hierarchy.

Design/methodology/approach

A self‐report questionnaire was distributed to a sample of council employees. The responses were analysed using thematic matrix displays.

Findings

Males and non‐management employees (when compared with female and management) perceived effective leadership as that which emphasises fairness, equality and honesty, develops staff, fosters workplace harmony, and is trustworthy. Female employees emphasised communication, decision‐making ability, and supporting the leader as being important to how a work unit could contribute to organizational leadership effectiveness. Employees at the management level underscored vision, supporting the leader, and integrity as being important to how a work unit could contribute to organizational leadership effectiveness. Female and non‐management employees highlighted employee development, contingent reward, communication and vision as being central to how organizational leadership could contribute to the effectiveness of the work unit.

Originality/value

Unlike the literature that differentiates between charismatic and transformational forms of leadership, this paper views these two constructs as both being components of transformational leadership.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2018

Nguyen T. Pham-Thai, Adela J. McMurray, Nuttawuth Muenjohn and Michael Muchiri

Employees’ job engagement is a key driver for organizational success and competitive advantage. Based on Kahn’s engagement theory and social exchange theory, the purpose…

Abstract

Purpose

Employees’ job engagement is a key driver for organizational success and competitive advantage. Based on Kahn’s engagement theory and social exchange theory, the purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between job engagement, transformational leadership, high-performance human resource (HR) practices, climate for innovation, and contextual performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey, conducted at two different points in time, was employed to collect data from 394 pairs of Vietnamese university academics and their leaders. Data were analyzed by structural equation modeling (SEM) and multilevel SEM using the Statistical Package for Social Science Version 24 and Mplus Version 7.4.

Findings

The findings indicated that transformational leadership and high-performance HR practices were key drivers of employees’ job engagement. A climate for innovation contributed effectively to mediate the effect of transformational leadership on employees’ job engagement. Further, employees’ job engagement was positively and significantly related to contextual performance.

Research limitations/implications

The short time lag between the two data collection phases might limit the ability to reach definite causal conclusions. Future research using a longitudinal design is needed to provide stronger validation for the underlying model.

Originality/value

This study is a rare attempt that investigates the process from which employees’ job engagement is generated and contributes to improve contextual performance in the higher education sector.

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Article
Publication date: 13 January 2021

Ataus Samad, Michael Muchiri and Sehrish Shahid

This article aims to understand the underlying mechanisms through which transformational leadership influences employee job satisfaction and turnover intentions…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to understand the underlying mechanisms through which transformational leadership influences employee job satisfaction and turnover intentions. Specifically, the study explores the mediation role of employee well-being on the relationships between leadership and both employee job satisfaction and turnover intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

Employing a quantitative research method, data were collected from 280 academics and professional staff from an Australian regional university. The Mplus software was used for data analysis.

Findings

The results showed that transformational leadership had significant positive impact on employee well-being and job satisfaction while it alleviated employee turnover intentions. Furthermore, employee well-being mediated the effect of transformational leadership on employee job satisfaction and turnover intentions.

Research limitations/implications

The research was cross-sectional, and data were collected from a convenient sample and therefore minimises our ability to generalise the findings to other contexts.

Practical implications

Effective leadership, employee well-being, job satisfaction and employee turnover are of strategic importance in the higher education sector in Australia and internationally. These findings will therefore provide a basis for university policy makers to craft relevant policies that promote effective leader behaviours and enhance employee well-being as they facilitate employee job satisfaction and minimise turnover intentions among higher education sector employees (i.e. academics and professional staff).

Originality/value

Our study provides a unique contribution to knowledge as it explains the mediation effect of employee well-being on the relation between transformational leadership a, job satisfaction and turnover intentions.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Timothy Silombela, Michael Mutingi and Ayon Chakraborty

The purpose of this paper is to provide an understanding on the impact of quality management (QM) tools and techniques in water supply infrastructure maintenance and the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an understanding on the impact of quality management (QM) tools and techniques in water supply infrastructure maintenance and the generation of non-revenue water (NRW) by Namibian Municipal Water Distributors.

Design/methodology/approach

In-depth interviews were selected as the primary data collection method, while secondary data were collected using document review and observations. In-depth interviews as primary method provided rich data and details on the subject matter from the respondents. Document review and observations provided a holistic perspective and understanding of the context within which the maintenance projects are handled by municipal water distributors.

Findings

The study found that as the number of QM tools employed to analyze maintenance data increases, the generation of NRW by the municipality decreases. However, for the tools to be effective, they should cover applications such as problem identification, data analysis, process analysis, decision making, planning, quality control and statistical process control, this helped Namibian municipalities to produce low volumes of NRW. In contrast, municipalities using QM tools arbitrarily lead to high quantities of NRW generation.

Originality/value

The World Bank recommends that NRW should be less than 25 percent of the total water produced, while in many countries NRW is up to 60 percent. Developed economies have made efforts to reduce NRW but efforts are still at nascent stage in emerging economies. This is the first study providing evidences of QM tools application in maintenance process and effect on NRW.

Details

Journal of Quality in Maintenance Engineering, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2511

Keywords

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