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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

Michael K. Buckland, Mark H. Butler, Barbara A. Norgard and Christian Plaunt

There has been a massive investment in the installation of online catalogs: in selection, in the supporting infrastructure of terminals and networks, in catalog record…

Abstract

There has been a massive investment in the installation of online catalogs: in selection, in the supporting infrastructure of terminals and networks, in catalog record conversion, in training, and, lately, in linking online catalogs with other online systems. In contrast, the state‐of‐the‐art of the functionality of online library catalogs has advanced little in the past few years. Rather it has been a matter of existing systems being upgraded towards the functionality of the better systems and of refinements being added. It is time for a further advance in online catalog design. We believe that the next generation of online catalogs should and will have features such as those discussed and illustrated in this article.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1994

Michael Buckland and Christian Plaunt

This article examines the structure and components of information storage and retrieval systems and information filtering systems. Analysis of the tasks performed in such…

Abstract

This article examines the structure and components of information storage and retrieval systems and information filtering systems. Analysis of the tasks performed in such selection systems leads to the identification of 13 components. Eight are necessarily present in all such systems, mechanized or not; the others may, but need not be, present. The authors argue that all selection systems can be represented in terms of combinations of these components. The components are of only two types: representations of data objects and functions that operate on them. Further, the functional components, or rules, reduce to two basic types: 1) transformation, making or modifying the members of a set of representations, and 2) sorting or partitioning. The representational transformations may be in the form of copies, excerpts, descriptions, abstractions, or mere identifying references. By partitioning, we mean dividing a set of objects by using matching, sorting, ranking, selecting, and other logically equivalent operations. The typical multiplicity of knowledge sources and of system vocabularies is noted. Some of the implications for the study, use, and design of information storage and retrieval systems are discussed.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

MICHAEL K. BUCKLAND

Libraries assemble very large quantities of materials. These collections perform three quite different roles: archival, dispensing, and bibliographic. The bibliographic…

Abstract

Libraries assemble very large quantities of materials. These collections perform three quite different roles: archival, dispensing, and bibliographic. The bibliographic role of the collection is compared with bibliographies and catalogues. The distinction between materials and collection development is basic. Collection development in libraries is analogous to file organisation in computing systems and, although commonly viewed narrowly as selection for acquisition, includes a range of decisions which determine the profile of any collection. The rise of remotely‐accessible materials makes possession less important relative to access, has important consequences for all three roles of collections, and indicates a shift in emphasis away from collection development and conventional catalogues and toward bibliography and cooperation.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1972

MICHAEL K. BUCKLAND

Considerable attention has been paid, in this journal and elsewhere, to each of two aspects of the use of literature. One of these is the relative decrease in use of…

Abstract

Considerable attention has been paid, in this journal and elsewhere, to each of two aspects of the use of literature. One of these is the relative decrease in use of material as it ages (‘obsolescence’) which has been discussed by Brookes and many others. The other aspect is the extent to which the use of material tends to be concentrated in a few titles (‘Bradford's Law of scattering’), which has been treated by Bradford, Leimkuhler, Brookes, and Fairthorne.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 September 2007

Niels Windfled Lund

503

Abstract

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 63 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1980

Paul Metz

The great majority of academic libraries find themselves in a vast and often unmarked territory between two polar sets of goals and aspirations. These two poles could be…

Abstract

The great majority of academic libraries find themselves in a vast and often unmarked territory between two polar sets of goals and aspirations. These two poles could be represented by the model of the great research library, on the one hand, and the discount store, on the other. In choosing the first ideal, the library decides to acquire as broad a selection of research materials as possible, including infrequently used primary materials (census records, publications from limited editions, personal manuscripts, and unpublished pamphlets) in order that researchers may, at least in theory, find the collection all‐ or nearly all‐sufficient. Holders of this view point with pride to the contents of the catalog. At the other pole, the library sets out to be as responsive to demand as possible, to provide more and more of the materials which “move off the shelves” and, like the discount store, to discontinue stock items which are less popular than something more attractive which might replace them. Advocates of this view point with pride to the swarming circulation desk.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 September 2008

Michael K. Buckland

72

Abstract

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 64 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Michael K. Buckland

713

Abstract

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 61 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Michael K. Buckland

The paper aims to explain the character and causes of obsolescence in assigned subject descriptors.

6474

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to explain the character and causes of obsolescence in assigned subject descriptors.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of a conceptual analysis with examples and reference to existing literature.

Findings

Subject description comes in two forms: assigning the name or code of a subject to a document and assigning a document to a named subject category. Each method associates a document with the name of a subject. This naming activity is the site of tensions between the procedural need of information systems for stable records and the inherent multiplicity and instability of linguistic expressions. As languages change, previously assigned subject descriptions become obsolescent. The issues, tensions, and compromises involved are introduced.

Originality/value

Drawing on the work of Robert Fairthorne and others, an explanation of the unavoidable obsolescence of assigned subject headings is presented. The discussion relates to libraries, but the same issues arise in any context in which subject description is expected to remain useful for an extended period of time.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 68 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

Clifford A. Lynch

Over the past eight years, the MELVYL catalog has become one of the largest public access catalogs in the world, and now plays a central role in providing access to the…

Abstract

Over the past eight years, the MELVYL catalog has become one of the largest public access catalogs in the world, and now plays a central role in providing access to the library resources of the University of California. Currently, under heavy load, the MELVYL catalog supports many hundreds of simultaneous terminal connections, servicing over a quarter of a million queries a week and displaying more than two million records a week to its user community. This article discusses the history of the network that has supported the MELVYL catalog from the early days of its prototype to the present. It also describes both the current technical and policy issues that must be addressed as the network moves into the 1990s, and the roles that the network is coming to play in integrating local automation, the union catalog, access to resource databases, and other initiatives. Sidebars discuss the TCP/IP protocol suite, internet protocol gateways, and Telenet and related inter‐operability problems.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

1 – 10 of 139