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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/EUM0000000000647. When citing the…

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/EUM0000000000647. When citing the article, please cite: Michael Jay Polonsky, Denise G. Jarratt, (1992), “Rural Outshopping in Australia: The Bathurst-Orange Region”, European Journal of Marketing, Vol. 26 Iss: 10, pp. 5 - 16.

Details

Asia Pacific International Journal of Marketing, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7517

Article
Publication date: 14 March 2022

Michael Jay Polonsky, Ahmed Ferdous, Nichola Robertson, Sandra Jones, Andre Renzaho and Joanne Telenta

This study aims to test the efficacy of the awareness of a transformative health service communication intervention targeted to African refugees in Australia, designed to…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to test the efficacy of the awareness of a transformative health service communication intervention targeted to African refugees in Australia, designed to increase their intentions to participate in blood donation and reduce any identified barriers.

Design/methodology/approach

Following the intervention launch, a survey was administered to African refugees. The data were analysed with structural equation modelling.

Findings

Intervention awareness increases refugees’ blood donation knowledge and intentions. Although it has no direct effect on refugees’ medical mistrust or perceived discrimination, intervention awareness indirectly reduces medical mistrust. The findings, thus, suggest that the intervention was transformative: it directly and indirectly reduced barriers to refugee participation in blood donation services.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include a relatively small sample size, single-country context and measures that address blood donation intentions versus behaviours.

Social implications

Addressing health service inequities through intervention awareness, via the mere exposure effect, can facilitate refugees’ health service participation and inclusion.

Originality/value

This study contributes to transformative service research and responds to calls to improve individual and community well-being by testing a transformative intervention targeted towards vulnerable consumers. Not all targeted refugees donated blood, but being encouraged to participate in this health service within the host society can foster their greater inclusion.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Michael Jay Polonsky

This commentary aims to discuss the potential role of corporate social marketing and identify instances where corporate involvement in social marketing is appropriate…

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Abstract

Purpose

This commentary aims to discuss the potential role of corporate social marketing and identify instances where corporate involvement in social marketing is appropriate. This argument is based on the rationale that there should be a focus on the social outcomes of initiatives rather than on which organisations are delivering the message.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is conceptual and draws on previous marketing, social marketing and health-related literature to discuss the potential positive role of firms in social marketing.

Findings

The paper proposes that there are many instances where corporations can play a vital role in enhancing social outcomes, even though they too may benefit from these social marketing activities (defined as corporate social marketing). It is argued that corporate social marketing is not only appropriate but also may, in fact, be more effective than social marketing undertaken solely by non-profits or governments. However, it is also identified that there may be inappropriate corporate participation in social marketing.

Practical implications

Two typologies are put forward to assist in evaluating the impact of firm behaviour on society and the situations where corporate social marketing may be more appropriate. These typologies may assist in identifying where firms can play a valuable role in social marketing activities.

Social implications

Use of the typologies proposed will assist in identifying where firms can play a valuable role in social marketing activities and bringing about social benefit.

Originality/value

The discussion of corporate involvement in social marketing generally has been positioned as negative and this paper identifies instances where corporate social marketing may not only be appropriate but also may, in fact, bring about better social outcomes than if the activities were undertaken by government or non-profits.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Michael Jay Polonsky and Don Scott

This paper seeks to examine whether the stakeholder strategy matrix provides useful guidance for managers in dealing with stakeholders. The matrix suggests that strategies…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to examine whether the stakeholder strategy matrix provides useful guidance for managers in dealing with stakeholders. The matrix suggests that strategies for dealing with stakeholders can be determined based on stakeholder ability to cooperate and threaten organisational outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a hypothetical scenario looking at the development of a new environmentally friendly product, where eight stakeholder groups and their influencing abilities are manipulated. Marketers reviewed one version of the scenario and were then asked the applicability of 13 strategies for each stakeholder group described. Mixed design analysis is then undertaken to examine the direct effects and interactions between the four combinations of influencing abilities, the stakeholder group examined or how the strategy suggested impacted on managers' views.

Findings

The research found that there was an interaction effect suggesting that some strategies were more applicable to stakeholders with certain sets of influencing abilities, as the stakeholder strategy matrix suggested. The specific stakeholder group examined also appeared to impact on managers' views, which is inconsistent with the theory.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations are that the research focused on managers' perceptions of the applicability of strategies, rather than the actual success of strategies examined. Research into the effectiveness of actual behaviours would possibly require more in‐depth examination of case studies.

Practical implications

The research suggests that the stakeholder strategy matrix may provide some guidance as to how managers deal with stakeholders. However, it also suggests that managers may be implicitly applying influencing abilities to groups irrespective of their “true” influencing ability. In this case managers are in fact ignoring valuable information when deciding how to interact with stakeholders and therefore possibly using less effective strategies to interact with stakeholders.

Originality/value

The research is unique as it looks at determining whether different types of strategies for dealing with stakeholders are perceived to be more or less effective. This therefore seeks to make stakeholder theory more strategic and applicable in a broader set of contexts. As such the paper would be of interest to managers seeking to understand better how to deal with stakeholders and to theorists seeking to understand better how stakeholder theory impacts on organisational outcomes.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 39 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 November 2021

Mohammad Tarikul Islam, Doren Chadee and Michael Jay Polonsky

This study aims to integrate social capital theory and the knowledge-based view of firms to develop and test a theoretical framework of the mechanisms that explain the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to integrate social capital theory and the knowledge-based view of firms to develop and test a theoretical framework of the mechanisms that explain the influence of relational governance (RG) on lead-time performance (LTP) of developing-country suppliers in global value chains (GVCs). The authors distinguish between the relational and structural dimensions of RG to explain how they interact to create knowledge and leaning opportunities that transform into performance outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses were tested using data collected from a sample of 321 Bangladeshi suppliers embedded in apparel GVCs by using structural equation modeling.

Findings

RG creates knowledge and learning opportunities that transform into LTP. Relationship quality (RQ) is found to contribute positively to knowledge learned (KL) contingent on relationship structure. KL is found to fully mediate the influence of buyer-supplier RQ on LTP of suppliers.

Research limitations/implications

The dyadic nature of buyer-supplier interactions calls for multisource approaches in measuring buyer-supplier RQ. The authors also recommend future research to test the model in other industries for greater generalizability.

Practical implications

Developing-country suppliers in low-technology labor-intensive GVCs can improve their LTP by strengthening their capabilities for internalizing external knowledge and developing and maintaining high quality relationships with wide networks of buyers.

Originality/value

The conceptualization of RG that explicitly distinguishes between the relational and structural dimensions is novel and should inspire future theoretical and empirical research on GVC governance and performance.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

Michael Jay Polonsky, Abby Ghobadian and Howard Viney

The environment continues to command serious attention as a key consideration in the corporate strategy process, both within the specialised environmental management…

Abstract

The environment continues to command serious attention as a key consideration in the corporate strategy process, both within the specialised environmental management literature and increasingly from the general management literature (Avila and Whitehead 1993, Porter and van der Linde 1993, Shrivastava 1992). One important area of academic examination is that of corporate environmental behaviour.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 20 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Article
Publication date: 28 July 2021

Nichola Robertson, Yelena Tsarenko, Michael Jay Polonsky and Lisa McQuilken

The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine the factors driving and mitigating the experienced vulnerabilities of women undergoing the transformative service of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine the factors driving and mitigating the experienced vulnerabilities of women undergoing the transformative service of in-vitro fertilisation (IVF), and how this influences women’s evaluations and intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual framework was tested using quantitative data collected via an online survey of Australian women who have undergone IVF treatment. Hayes’ PROCESS macro was used to analyse the data.

Findings

The results indicate that women’s persistent goal-striving alongside their perceived personal sacrifices influence the association between their need for parenthood and their experienced vulnerability. Institutional factors such as IVF clinic technical and interpersonal quality influence these consumers’ IVF experience evaluations and word-of-mouth (WoM) intentions.

Research limitations/implications

This study’s results are limited to women who are undergoing IVF treatment. Further empirical work is needed to deepen the understanding of the role played by partners and other family members in women’s IVF experiences.

Practical implications

IVF clinics can reduce women’s experienced vulnerability by encouraging women who have a good probability of succeeding to persist in the pursuit of the goal of conceiving a child via IVF. This can be achieved by enabling and empowering them so that they give themselves the best chance during treatment, thus facilitating their control. Managing the expectations of those women with a lower probability of success is also recommended. The importance of the technical and interpersonal quality delivered by IVF clinics in influencing the positive evaluations and behavioural intentions of women experiencing vulnerabilities is further highlighted.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the transformative service research literature by: examining the IVF transformative experience, which has been largely overlooked; focussing on the intersection of transformative services and consumers experiencing vulnerability, which is an emerging research area; and testing a framework quantitatively that intermingles individual and institutional factors as antecedents and consequences of consumers’ experienced vulnerabilities, advancing the existing conceptual and qualitative work.

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Janet Hoek and Ninya Maubach

To explore how a “harm chain” analysis could identify and address stakeholders' concerns about direct‐to‐consumer advertising of prescription medicines (DTCA).

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Abstract

Purpose

To explore how a “harm chain” analysis could identify and address stakeholders' concerns about direct‐to‐consumer advertising of prescription medicines (DTCA).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyses the development of stakeholder theory before exploring and discussing the tension between normative and instrumental logic. The authors adopt a utilitarian perspective, which they use to identify the range of stakeholders involved with or affected by DTCA.

Findings

A “harm chain” analysis identifies common concerns held by stakeholders; these include disquiet over the quality of information provided via DTCA and possible derogation of doctors' role as prescribers. The paper outlines prescriptive advertising guidelines that could address these issues, but notes that failure to achieve a satisfactory reduction in harm potential may result in a ban on DTCA.

Research limitations/implications

Although a utilitarian norm will not satisfy all stakeholders' interests, the authors believe that it will produce the greatest reduction in harm, as well as maximising the benefits that can result from DTCA. The conclusions imply the need for independent monitoring of DTCA's effects on stakeholder groups to ensure that regulations governing this advertising are broadly based.

Practical implications

The authors suggest changes to DTCA regulation, specifically the introduction of a “fair balance” criterion and a statement explicitly recognising doctors' role in determining appropriate treatments.

Originality/value

Although the debate over DTCA has been well documented, this paper represents the first attempt to use stakeholder theory to explore the ethical issues associated with this advertising. The analysis produces a decision‐making model that the authors recommend should guide future policy decisions.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 39 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

Michael Jay Polonsky, Romana Garma and John D. Mittelstaedt

The purpose of this paper is to examine the global contribution of academics to marketing literature between 1999 and 2003, based on an examination of the location of…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the global contribution of academics to marketing literature between 1999 and 2003, based on an examination of the location of academics institution of employment, as reported in published works. The data is used to evaluate the global dispersion of publishing.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses the method of content analysis where the authorship of all articles in 20 leading marketing journals between 1999 and 2003 is examined. An empirical examination of performance was undertaken across geographic regions. There was also an examination of whether the quality of journal affected regional performance.

Findings

The research found that there is a significant “bias” of authorship within the 20 journals examined, with the majority of works published by academics at institutions in North America. There is some variation in regional performance based on the type of journal examined.

Research limitations/implications

There was no attempt to empirically examine why differences might exist. The study only focused on a sample of 20 English language journals over five years. These journals have been included in studies that list the leading marketing journal for US and European academics.

Practical implications

The research suggests that there may in fact be regional differences in publishing behaviour. It is unclear if these differences relate to variations in the “objectives” of institutions within each country or other factors, such as the North American publish‐or‐perish mentality. The research posits that a marketing knowledge may be unnecessarily restricted, if there is a bias against non‐North American perspectives.

Originality/value

While there have been other works examining research performance of institutions, there has been limited examination in marketing on the nation in which authors work and none have used a broad cross‐section of journals. This work takes a global “snapshot” of national research performance within marketing.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 August 2008

Michael Jay Polonsky

The purpose of this paper is to propose and examine streams in the literature related to academic publishing, with a focus on works in marketing. The content of the works…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose and examine streams in the literature related to academic publishing, with a focus on works in marketing. The content of the works within each theme are then explored to identify what issues have been examined and their implications.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a literature review, drawing on 30 years of research on academic publishing in marketing. The review is designed to cover the underlying issues examined, but is not designed to be comprehensive in terms of all the works exploring each stream of research.

Findings

There are five main streams in the literature focusing on: rankings; theory and knowledge development; how to publish;, criticisms of publishing; and other issues. Within each stream, a number of sub‐areas are explored. The works tend to be fragmented and there is generally limited in‐depth qualitative research within streams exploring the underlying assumptions on which publishing is based.

Research limitations/implications

The focus of the research is on the streams of works, rather than the findings within each stream and future research could explore each of these streams and sub‐streams in more detail. Generally, the works appear to becoming increasingly sophisticated in terms of their analysis, which is only possible with the new technologies available. New metrics proposed in the literature that can be used to better understand publishing and additional qualitative research exploring some of the basic assumptions could also be explored.

Practical implications

The research suggests that some streams with regard to academic publishing may have reached saturation and future publishing in these areas will need to be innovative in its approach and analysis, if these works are to be published.

Originality/value

This paper is the first attempt to develop streams within the literature on academic publishing in marketing and thus draws together a diverse cross‐section of works. It provides suggestions for directions for future research in the various streams.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

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