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Article
Publication date: 19 January 2015

Angeli Santos, Michael J. Mustafa and Terk Chern Gwi

This study aims to examine the concepts of trait emotional intelligence (EI), emotional labour strategies and burnout among internal human resources (HR) service…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the concepts of trait emotional intelligence (EI), emotional labour strategies and burnout among internal human resources (HR) service providers. It proposes a model to deepen our understanding of the processes explaining the protective effects of trait EI on employee burnout.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study comprises a sample of 143 HR professionals from a large Malaysian financial institution.

Findings

Results suggest that trait EI predicted personal- and work-related burnout but not client-related burnout. Trait EI was also found to be partly related to emotional labour (EL), exhibiting a negative relationship with surface acting but not with deep acting. While surface acting exhibited a significant relationship on all three forms of burnout, deep acting was only significantly related to client burnout. Moreover, mediation analyses revealed that surface acting partly mediated the relationship between EI and burnout.

Originality/value

This study examines the relationship between EI, EL and burnout in HR professionals. This study is the first in the literature to examine these relationships in the context of internal service providers and in a non-Western context. Our study enhances our understanding of the processes explaining the protective effects of trait EI on employee burnout in a non-Western context.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2020

Michael Mustafa, Hazel Melanie Ramos and Siti Khadijah Zainal Badri

The purpose of this study seeks to examine how nonfamily employees' job autonomy and work passion can influence their job satisfaction and intention to quit in family…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study seeks to examine how nonfamily employees' job autonomy and work passion can influence their job satisfaction and intention to quit in family small-to-medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Current, research regarding the determinants of nonfamily employees' job satisfaction and turnover intentions has largely focused on the effects of family influence and family firm characteristics. Accordingly, not much is known of how the job characteristics and emotions of nonfamily employees influence their job satisfaction and intention to quit.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 160 nonfamily employees across 28 family-SMEs. Process macro was used to analyze the mediating role of nonfamily employees' work passion in the relationship between their job autonomy and job satisfaction and intention to quit.

Findings

Findings showed that nonfamily employees' job autonomy only had a significant direct effects on their job satisfaction and not their intention to quit. Subsequently, nonfamily employees' work passion was found to only partially mediate the relationship between their job autonomy and job satisfaction.

Originality/value

By focusing on the concepts of job autonomy and work passion, the study adds additional insights about the drivers of nonfamily employees' pro-organizational attitudes in family-SMEs. Also the study represents one of the first efforts in the literature to establish a link between job autonomy and the work passion of nonfamily employees with respect to their job satisfaction.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

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Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2018

Abstract

Details

Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Michael Mustafa, Alan Coetzer, Hazel Melanie Ramos and Jorg Fuhrer

The purpose is to contribute to the debate on how job satisfaction might influence small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) employees' propensity to engage in innovative…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose is to contribute to the debate on how job satisfaction might influence small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) employees' propensity to engage in innovative work behaviours. The authors examine the relations between job satisfaction and innovative work behaviour and each of its sub-dimensions: idea generation, promotion and realisation. Additionally, the authors explore the potential moderating effects of openness to experience and conscientiousness on the relations between job satisfaction and innovative work behaviour and each of the sub-dimensions of innovative work behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

Paper-based questionnaires were used to collect data from employees in 28 SMEs located in the Aargau region of Switzerland. All the SMEs were part of the high-tech manufacturing industry. The authors’ hypothesized model was tested using hierarchal regression analysis on a sample of 125 employees.

Findings

Job satisfaction was positively related to innovative work behaviour and to each of its sub-dimensions: idea generation, promotion and realisation. Openness to experience moderated the relationships between job satisfaction and innovative work behaviour and job satisfaction and the sub-dimensions idea generation, idea promotion and idea realisation. However, conscientiousness did not moderate the relationship between job satisfaction and innovative work behaviour, nor between job satisfaction and each of the sub-dimensions of innovative work behaviour.

Practical implications

Findings demonstrate that supportive work environments in SMEs which help develop job satisfaction among employees can have positive effects on the discretionary performances of employees.

Originality/value

Studies that examine relationships between job satisfaction and innovative work behaviours in SMEs are extremely sparse. This study makes novel contributions to this line of inquiry by examining how job satisfaction relates to each of the three sub-dimensions of innovative work behaviour and by exploring the potential moderating roles of two important personality traits in these relationships.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Stephen A. Woods, Michael James Mustafa, Neil Anderson and Benjamin Sayer

The literature on individual differences in innovative work behavior (IWB) reveals inconsistencies in the relations of personality traits and tenure on innovation at work…

Abstract

Purpose

The literature on individual differences in innovative work behavior (IWB) reveals inconsistencies in the relations of personality traits and tenure on innovation at work. To provide greater clarity about the effects of these antecedents, the purpose of this paper is to report a study of the moderating effects of tenure on the associations of traits and IWB, and apply a theoretical lens based on the trait-activation theory.

Design/methodology/approach

In all, 146 employees of a UK-based financial institution completed measures of conscientiousness and openness, and had three aspects of IWB (idea generation, promotion, and realization) rated by their line-supervisor. All participants were on graduate training programs. Hierarchical regression analyses were used to test the moderating effects of tenure on the associations of the self-reported traits with the supervisor-rated IWB outcomes.

Findings

Tenure moderated the effects of conscientiousness on IWB, with highly conscientious employees being less innovative with longer tenure. Tenure moderated the effect of openness with idea generation with highly open employees generating more ideas if they were longer tenured.

Practical implications

Management of innovation requires differentiated strategies based on the personality traits and tenure of individual employees. Implications for recruitment, socialization and development are discussed.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine empirically the interactions of traits and contextual factors (i.e. organizational tenure) on IWB, framed around a strong theoretical foundation (i.e. trait activation theory). The study also makes notable contributions by measuring innovative behavior using a supervisor-rated and multidimensional approach.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2020

Wen Li Chan and Michael James Mustafa

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of studies published in the Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies (JEEE) between 2014 and 2019. The review…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of studies published in the Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies (JEEE) between 2014 and 2019. The review also provides suggestions for future research in JEEE.

Design/methodology/approach

Integrative literature of 90 empirical and conceptual articles published in JEEE between 2014 and 2019. The selected articles were analyzed using content analysis.

Findings

Analysis of the 90 published articles shows that JEEE has covered a number of relevant topics related to entrepreneurship and innovation in emerging economies. In particular, scholars have adopted a variety of methods to describe such activities in emerging economies. The review also highlights the lack of comparative studies in JEEE and studies, which significantly take into account or focus on the emerging economy context.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that future scholars wishing to submit to JEEE should consider taking a more detailed account of the emerging context.

Originality/value

Since its first publication in 2014, this study represents the first review of articles found in JEEE. Specifically, the study provides a platform for future scholars wishing to submit to JEEE to take stock of the studies in the journal, thus giving them a better understanding of the field. The study also provides directions regarding areas of possible future research, which might be of interest to scholars wishing to submit to JEEE.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

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Book part
Publication date: 20 May 2019

Abstract

Details

Race, Organizations, and the Organizing Process
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-492-3

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Michael James Mustafa, Ernesto Hernandez, Christopher Mahon and Lai Kei Chee

This paper aims to develop an empirical model that examines whether a student’s proactive personality or the university support environment (education support, concept…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to develop an empirical model that examines whether a student’s proactive personality or the university support environment (education support, concept development support and business development support) affects their entrepreneurial intentions. Additionally, the relative strengths of a student’s proactive personality and the university environment influences are compared.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 141 students attending a well-established and internationally renowned Malaysian higher education institution completed a questionnaire survey. Results were based on correlation and regression analysis.

Findings

Results indicate that a proactive personality and concept development support have significant impact on students’ entrepreneurial intentions. Additionally, the results showed that a student’s proactive personality had a greater effect on their entrepreneurial intentions than that of the university support environment.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates one of the few attempts to examine the effects of both a proactive personality and university support environment on entrepreneurial intentions in an emerging economy context. Specifically, we reconfirm students’ personality traits as a more important predictor of their entrepreneurial intentions than environmental factors in the Malaysian context. Additionally, by also demonstrating concept development support as a significant predictor of entrepreneurial intentions, we provide new insights into how universities in emerging economies can foster the entrepreneurial intentions of their students. This result adds to the academic literature on entrepreneurial intentions in emerging economies.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

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Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2020

Ramnath Dixit and Vinita Sinha

This chapter discusses key training challenges that organizations need to confront with the objective of building a robust human resource management system. Given the…

Abstract

This chapter discusses key training challenges that organizations need to confront with the objective of building a robust human resource management system. Given the dynamics of the current business environment, training and development has become an indispensable function in global organizations. Building an effective human capital that contributes to continual organizational growth has become the established norm to survive in a competitive business landscape. However, the training and development function is often rendered ineffective, on account of various bottlenecks existing in the organization. Addressing these bottlenecks is quintessential in ensuring the creation of a performance-driven human capital. The goal of this chapter is to draw attention to the training impediments that hinder organizational growth and to diagnose the underlying causes for the same. This chapter concludes with recommendations that organizational decision-makers can leverage in their quest to strengthen the human capital, by utilizing their training and development infrastructure optimally.

Details

Contemporary Global Issues in Human Resource Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-393-9

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Article
Publication date: 28 February 2019

Ataollah Taghipour Anvari, Mustafa Mahamid, Michael McNallan and Mohammadreza Eslami

The purpose of this paper is to present the effect of damaged fireproofing on structural steel members. This study will show that a minor damage in fireproofing will…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the effect of damaged fireproofing on structural steel members. This study will show that a minor damage in fireproofing will reduce the fire rating of members significantly. Damaged fireproofing happens in structures due to various reasons, and the question is always how effective is this fireproofing? This paper presents the results of one type of fireproofing and presents a parametric study on the size of damage and its effect on fire resistance of structural steel members.

Design/methodology/approach

The study has been performed using numerical methods, thermal and structural finite element analysis. The analysis method has been verified by experimental results.

Findings

Small fire protection damage or loss leads to significant rise of temperature at the damaged parts and causes severe fire resistance reduction of beams. The higher fire protection damage’s extension at the bottom flange of the steel beams does not have any major influence on the rate of reduction of fire resistance of the beams. Steel beams experience greater fire resistance reduction at higher load levels because of the existing of higher stresses and loads within the steel beam section.

Research limitations/implications

The study has been performed using finite element analysis, and it covers a wide range of practical sizes. However, experimental work will be performed by the researchers when funding is granted.

Practical implications

The study provides researchers and practitioners with an estimate on the effect of damaged fireproofing on fire resistance of structural steel beams.

Social implications

Understanding the effect of the effect of damaged fireproofing helps in estimating the fire resistance of structural steel members, which may protect collapses and disasters.

Originality/value

The research is original; extensive literature review has been performed, and this research is original.

Details

Journal of Structural Fire Engineering, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-2317

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