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Book part
Publication date: 20 June 2008

Masaaki Kotabe, Janet Y. Murray and Michael J. Mol

Increased global sourcing of manufacturing and service activities has been a prominent part of the restructuring of firms’ supply chains in the 1990s and beyond. Academics…

Abstract

Increased global sourcing of manufacturing and service activities has been a prominent part of the restructuring of firms’ supply chains in the 1990s and beyond. Academics and consultancy firms have largely supported the view of global sourcing as one of the key drivers of superior performance. As we are now increasingly discovering, the drawbacks of offshore outsourcing – or, put differently, the advantages of vertical integration – have been underestimated or even neglected. In this chapter, we first discuss the need to balance sourcing levels and then how global sourcing levels must achieve a strategic fit with the environment. Finally, we synthesize these balance and fit perspectives to suggest how, over time, changes in the fit alter the required balance in global sourcing. From this synthesis, we develop a number of future research questions related to important conceptual perspectives on sourcing. For managers we provide indications of how they can achieve a balance and a fit of their sourcing strategies.

Details

International Business Scholarship: AIB Fellows on the First 50 Years and Beyond
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1470-6

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Kristin Brandl, Michael J. Mol and Bent Petersen

A service production system has a structure composed of task execution, agents performing tasks and a resulting service output. The purpose of this paper is to understand…

Abstract

Purpose

A service production system has a structure composed of task execution, agents performing tasks and a resulting service output. The purpose of this paper is to understand how such a service production system changes as a consequence of offshoring.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on practice theory, the paper investigates how offshoring leads to reconfiguration of the service production system. Through a multiple case methodology, the authors demonstrate how agents and structures interact during reconfiguration.

Findings

The paper analyses the reconfiguration of components of a service production system in response to change ignited by offshoring. The authors find recurring effects between structures that enable and constrain agents and agents who shape the structure of the production system.

Research limitations/implications

The paper offers a novel contribution to the service operations management literature by applying practice theory. Moreover, the authors propose a detailed, activity-driven view of service production systems and service offshoring. The authors contribute to practice theory by extending its domain to operations management.

Practical implications

Service production systems have the ability to self-correct any changes inflicted through offshoring of the systems, which helps firms that offshore.

Originality/value

The paper is aimed at service professionals and offshoring managers and proposes a novel presentation of the service production system with a description of how it responds to offshoring. The authors contribute to theory by applying practice theory to the fields of service operations management and offshoring.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 37 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Book part
Publication date: 2 September 2010

Michael J. Mol and Julian Birkinshaw

This paper relates management innovation to multinational corporations (MNCs). We argue that MNCs play two key roles in implementing management innovations. First, they…

Abstract

This paper relates management innovation to multinational corporations (MNCs). We argue that MNCs play two key roles in implementing management innovations. First, they can engage in management innovating by inventing and implementing new management practices. We show that while MNCs have been involved in management innovating, few of their management innovations are specifically international in nature. Second, they can be involved in the diffusion of management innovations, including the transfer of new management practices to other countries. There is more evidence for this role. We propose that international business research should attempt to incorporate management innovation into its body of research themes.

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The Past, Present and Future of International Business & Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-085-9

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Book part
Publication date: 20 June 2008

Abstract

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International Business Scholarship: AIB Fellows on the First 50 Years and Beyond
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1470-6

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Article
Publication date: 9 September 2019

Anders Örtenblad

Abstract

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Book part
Publication date: 2 September 2010

Abstract

Details

The Past, Present and Future of International Business & Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-085-9

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Book part
Publication date: 2 September 2010

Abstract

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The Past, Present and Future of International Business & Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-085-9

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Abstract

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The Environmental State Under Pressure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-854-5

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Book part
Publication date: 12 January 2021

Roger Friedland

In this paper, I compare Theodore Schatzki’s practice theory, the existential phenomenology of Martin Heidegger upon whom Schatzki drew in its formation, and my own theory…

Abstract

In this paper, I compare Theodore Schatzki’s practice theory, the existential phenomenology of Martin Heidegger upon whom Schatzki drew in its formation, and my own theory of institutional logics which I have sought to develop as a religious sociology of institution. I examine how Schatzki and I both differently locate our thinking at the level of practice. In this essay I also explore the possibility of appropriating Heidegger’s religious ontology of worldhood, which Schatzki rejects, in that project. My institutional logical position is an atheological religious one, poly-onto-teleological. Institutional logics are grounded in ultimate goods which are praiseworthy “objects” of striving and practice, signifieds to which elements of an institutional logic have a non-arbitrary relation, sources of and references for practical norms about how one should have, make, do or be that good, and a basis of knowing the world of practice as ordered around such goods. Institutional logics are constellations co-constituted by substances, not fields animated by values, interests or powers.

Because we are speaking against “values,” people are horrified at a philosophy that ostensibly dares to despise humanity’s best qualities. For what is more “logical” than that a thinking that denies values must necessarily pronounce everything valueless? Martin Heidegger, “Letter on Humanism” (2008a, p. 249).

Details

On Practice and Institution: Theorizing the Interface
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-413-4

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Oskar Finnerman, Narges Razmjoo, Ning Guo, Michael Strand and Henrik Ström

This work aims to investigate the effects of neglecting, modelling or partly resolving turbulent fluctuations of velocity, temperature and concentrations on the predicted…

Abstract

Purpose

This work aims to investigate the effects of neglecting, modelling or partly resolving turbulent fluctuations of velocity, temperature and concentrations on the predicted turbulence-chemistry interaction in urea-selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) systems.

Design/methodology/approach

Numerical predictions of the NO conversion efficiency in an industrial urea-SNCR system are compared to experimental data. Reactor models of varying complexity are assessed, ranging from one-dimensional ideal reactor models to state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics simulations based on the detached-eddy simulation (DES) approach. The models use the same reaction mechanism but differ in the degree to which they resolve the turbulent fluctuations of the gas phase. A methodology for handling of unknown experimental data with regard to providing adequate boundary conditions is also proposed.

Findings

One-dimensional reactor models may be useful for a first quick assessment of urea-SNCR system performance. It is critical to account for heat losses, if present, due to the significant sensitivity of the overall process to temperature. The most comprehensive DES setup evaluated is associated with approximately two orders of magnitude higher computational cost than the conventional Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes-based simulations. For studies that require a large number of simulations (e.g. optimizations or handling of incomplete experimental data), the less costly approaches may be favored with a tolerable loss of accuracy.

Originality/value

Novel numerical and experimental results are presented to elucidate the role of turbulent fluctuations on the performance of a complex, turbulent, reacting multiphase flow.

Details

International Journal of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0961-5539

Keywords

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