Search results

1 – 10 of 29
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Tim Knowles and Michael J. Howley

Whilst the traditional English public house still represents the largest part of the market, its share is falling with the introduction of themed branded establishments…

Abstract

Whilst the traditional English public house still represents the largest part of the market, its share is falling with the introduction of themed branded establishments. The UK's pub retailers have over the past five years reacted to a developing society whereby attitudes towards leisure time, drinking, eating out, health and entertainment have changed. Through diversification, they have moved away from the traditional British public house towards branded outlets that are able to appeal to diverse consumer demands. The reasons for this diversification will be explored along with the brewers' response. Within this process of diversification is the matter of promotion and branding. The emphasis seems to be slowly moving away from the beer product of a particular brewer to a focus on the service providers' corporate image, name and reputation. In cases such as Whitbread and Bass, companies are introducing a hierarchy of brands that revolve around five issues: physical evidence, service delivery, process, people and quality. It is the customer's perception of these five attributes that will determine establishments' success. This paper critically analyses the reasons for success of pub branding with a link made between the nature of the “product” and customers' perception.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 2000

Tim Knowles and Michael J. Howley

While the traditional English public house still represents the largest part of the market, its share is falling with the introduction of themed branded establishments…

Downloads
3143

Abstract

While the traditional English public house still represents the largest part of the market, its share is falling with the introduction of themed branded establishments. The UK’s pub retailers have over the past five years reacted to a developing society whereby attitudes towards leisure time, drinking, eating out, health and entertainment have changed. Through diversification, they have moved away from the traditional British public house towards branded outlets that are able to appeal to diverse consumer demands. The reasons for this diversification will be explored along with the brewers’ response. Within this process of diversification lies the matter of promotion and branding. The emphasis seems to be slowly moving away from the beer product of a particular brewer to a focus on the service providers’ corporate image, name and reputation. In cases such as Whitbread and Bass, companies are introducing a hierarchy of brands that revolve around five issues: physical evidence, service delivery, process, people, and quality. It is the customer’s perception of these five attributes that will determine establishments’ success. One such brand has been the Irish themed pub. This paper will critically analyse the reasons for the success of this Irish phenomenon with a link made between the nature of this particular “product” and customers’ perception of it.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1998

Michael Howley and Hayley Myers

This article describes a study which is being undertaken by the authors of the adoption processes used by UK retailers in the case of new wine and spirit products…

Abstract

This article describes a study which is being undertaken by the authors of the adoption processes used by UK retailers in the case of new wine and spirit products. Following a literature review they outline the work of earlier researchers in deducing the factors which retailers, in general, consider in deciding whether or not to stock a new product. The principal factors are found to be consumer demand, compatibility with existing merchandise, financial criteria and manufacturer's support for the product The article also highlights the increasing concentration of buyer power in the UK grocery market.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 June 2019

Ben Dyson, Donal Howley and Yanhua Shen

The purpose of this paper is to study teachers’ perspectives of social and emotional learning (SEL) in Aotearoa New Zealand (NZ) primary schools.

Downloads
3023

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study teachers’ perspectives of social and emotional learning (SEL) in Aotearoa New Zealand (NZ) primary schools.

Design/methodology/approach

This research was a case study design investigating the phenomenon of SEL in primary schools (elementary school level) in Aotearoa NZ (Stake, 2005).

Findings

The SEL themes that were drawn from the data were: positive interdependence, empowerment, self-management, self-awareness restorative conversations and circle time.

Research limitations/implications

The research challenges the field to work with teachers and community workers to create more in-depth qualitative research knowledge that is contextually relevant to SEL for researchers, educational policymakers and our children.

Originality/value

Based in Aotearoa NZ primary schools, this qualitative research provides a unique perspective of SEL from school-based practicing teachers.

Details

Journal of Research in Innovative Teaching & Learning, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2397-7604

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Michael Howley and Nicola Young

Attempts to quantify the impact of de‐alcoholized, low and reduced‐alcohol wines on the UK wine market, from their appearance in the late 1980s, to the present day. Also…

Abstract

Attempts to quantify the impact of de‐alcoholized, low and reduced‐alcohol wines on the UK wine market, from their appearance in the late 1980s, to the present day. Also assesses whether makers have been successful with the wines under discussion in their aim to capture a substantial percentage of the total wine market, examining the roles which the consumer and the marketing industry have played in the product and market development, and subsequently the wine's success or failure in attaining its goals. Particularly examines the role marketing may have to play in the future, if these products are to sustain market growth and finally gain acceptability as a purchase in their own right.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Protest Technologies and Media Revolutions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-647-4

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Michael Howley

In the new product development (NPD) literature, little attention has been paid to the use of external marketing consultancies in the process. This work describes a study…

Downloads
2550

Abstract

In the new product development (NPD) literature, little attention has been paid to the use of external marketing consultancies in the process. This work describes a study, using both personal and telephone interviewing, of 50 British‐based consumer goods companies with a view to identifying the organisational structures they used for NPD. The study focused on the use of specialist NPD marketing consultancies in order to try and establish why successful companies regularly used such consultancies even though they already had their own marketing departments. It was found that the most common reason given for the use of consultancies was to bring in an objective view, from outside the company engaged in development, to work on NPD decisions. Even sophisticated companies found it valuable to employ consultants who could operate with detachment from day‐to‐day business issues and company politics.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 11 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Acácia Gonçalves Ferreira Leal, Rodrigo Luiz Vancini, Paulo Gentil, Ana Amélia Benedito-Silva, Antonio Carlos da Silva, Mário Hebling Campos, Marilia Santos Andrade and Claudio Andre Barbosa de Lira

The purpose of this paper was to assess the knowledge on sport and exercise science held by a sample of Brazilian physiotherapists, nutritionists and physical educators.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to assess the knowledge on sport and exercise science held by a sample of Brazilian physiotherapists, nutritionists and physical educators.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional research design was used. The answers given by 1,147 professionals (300 physiotherapists, 705 physical educators and 142 nutritionists) who participated in a qualifying process for a specialization course on exercise physiology were analyzed. Questions were analyzed on maximal oxygen uptake (four questions), physical fitness assessment (three questions), physical training (two questions), bioenergetics (one question) and exercise in extreme environments (one question).

Findings

The results revealed misconceptions held by Brazilian health professionals on a number of concepts related to sport and exercise science, such as maximal oxygen uptake.

Practical implications

These results reinforce the need for continuing education programs to maximize the quality of the service provided by sport and exercise science professionals in Brazil. Improvements in the undergraduate courses curriculum are also recommended.

Originality/value

This is the first study to assess misconceptions about sport and exercise science among Brazilian health professionals.

Details

Health Education, vol. 118 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1994

François d'Hauteville

The wine industry is facing a continuous decrease in wine consumption on the part of the more frequent users of the product, particularly in the counties where wine…

Downloads
1545

Abstract

The wine industry is facing a continuous decrease in wine consumption on the part of the more frequent users of the product, particularly in the counties where wine drinking is traditional. The surveys show that alcohol is one important reason for not (or no longer) drinking. Several firms or research institutes are then turning to low alcohol wine as a solution to this problem, so far with limited success. Is the consumer ready to accept such a product in the first place? This paper is an attempt to identify those factors associated with the acceptance of a new product, taking low alcohol wine as an example. Acceptability of low alcohol wine is presented as an attitudinal model in which perception of product attributes, involvement in wine, consumption habits for wine and light products in general, personal innovativeness and consumption situations are determinant factors. This research suggests that low alcohol wine could get acceptance if the problem of the taste can be solved. In this case, low alcohol wine should be positioned as a wine rather than a diet drink.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 18 January 2008

Beau Breslin, John J.P. Howley and Molly Appel

This chapter explores how the principles of retribution and deterrence were framed and thus used to justify capital punishment in the early years of the Republic, and how…

Abstract

This chapter explores how the principles of retribution and deterrence were framed and thus used to justify capital punishment in the early years of the Republic, and how the purposes for capital punishment have changed in the past two centuries. We ask several related questions: (1) Has our understanding of the morality and utility of retributive justice changed so dramatically that the historical argument tying justification for capital punishment to the past now ought to carry less weight? (2) Have our perspectives on the purposes for capital punishment changed in ways that now might call the entire experiment into question? and (3) What, in short, can we say about the historical similarities between arguments concerning retribution and deterrence at the Founding and those same arguments today?As is often true of common law principles, the reasons for the rule are less sure and less uniform than the rule itself. (Justice Marshall's majority opinion in Ford v. Wainwright, 477 U.S. 399 (1986))

Details

Special Issue: Is the Death Penalty Dying?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1467-6

1 – 10 of 29