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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2008

Michael J Gibney, Hester H. Vorster and Frans J. Kok

Abstract

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Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

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Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Book part
Publication date: 12 September 2014

Teressa L. Elliott and Catherine Neal

With the large majority of colleges and schools of business integrating ethics into their curricula, business ethics educators must work to improve the quality of…

Abstract

With the large majority of colleges and schools of business integrating ethics into their curricula, business ethics educators must work to improve the quality of instruction and find methods that enhance student learning. Because many films now address business ethics issues, the content of these films may be used to enhance the teaching of business ethics to undergraduate and graduate business students. This chapter suggests films that may be presented in business ethics classes to illustrate the four ethical categories set forth by the accrediting body for schools of business, The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB International), in their 2004 report on ethics education in business schools: ethical decision-making, ethical leadership, responsibility of business in society, and corporate governance.

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The Contribution of Fiction to Organizational Ethics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-949-2

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Martin Quinn

To examine the governance network in Northamptonshire, an area awarded the status of the most enterprising place in Britain in 2012.

Abstract

Purpose

To examine the governance network in Northamptonshire, an area awarded the status of the most enterprising place in Britain in 2012.

Methodology

A combination of original interviews and documentary analysis to track the development of governance across two place-based initiatives.

Findings

Governance and leadership efforts were hindered by three factors prior to 2010; geographical, issues of legitimacy and a lack of stimulus for action in a successful economy. Changes since the General Election have enabled the Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP) to overcome the first of these but work on the other two is ongoing.

Research limitations

The research has been conducted in the early stages of the LEP’s work and more time is needed to see if the progress made to date translates into a meaningful role.

Social implications

Place-based strategies need to be based around pre-agreed territorial boundaries. In addition development agencies need to be able to demonstrate competency in order to be seen as legitimate actors.

Originality/value of chapter

The chapter offers an insight into establishing governance and leadership in an already successful economy. Most papers in this area either examine deprived areas or areas where governance is key to the success.

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Enterprising Places: Leadership and Governance Networks
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-641-5

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Breaking the Zero-Sum Game
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-186-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1997

John Lie

From 1953 to 1961, the South Korean economy grew slowly; the average per capita GNP growth was a mere percent, amounting to less than $100 in 1961. Few people, therefore…

Abstract

From 1953 to 1961, the South Korean economy grew slowly; the average per capita GNP growth was a mere percent, amounting to less than $100 in 1961. Few people, therefore, look for the sources of later dynamism in this period. As Kyung Cho Chung (1956:225) wrote in the mid‐1950s: “[South Korea] faces grave economic difficulties. The limitations imposed by the Japanese have been succeeded by the division of the country, the general destruction incurred by the Korean War, and the attendant dislocation of the population, which has further disorganized the economy” (see also McCune 1956:191–192). T.R. Fehrenbach (1963:37), in his widely read book on the Korean War, prognosticated: “By themselves, the two halves [of Korea] might possibly build a viable economy by the year 2000, certainly not sooner.”

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International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 17 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Book part
Publication date: 24 May 2021

Rebbecca Reed-Arthurs, Michael P. Akemann and David J. Teece

Recent US federal court rulings have provided new guidance on the use of economic models of bargaining in estimating reasonable royalty damages in patent cases. After…

Abstract

Recent US federal court rulings have provided new guidance on the use of economic models of bargaining in estimating reasonable royalty damages in patent cases. After reviewing relevant case law and providing an overview of the bargaining range approach, we describe one analytic method (the Rubinstein Bargaining Model) for developing a quantitative starting point with which to divide a bargaining range and explain how it can be tied, at least in part, to the facts and circumstances of the parties around the time of the Hypothetical Negotiation. We also describe how this approach can be used in conjunction with an analysis of other quantitative and qualitative factors related to the bargaining power of the parties, to help estimate reasonable royalty damages.

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The Law and Economics of Patent Damages, Antitrust, and Legal Process
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-024-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

George K. Chako

Briefly reviews previous literature by the author before presenting an original 12 step system integration protocol designed to ensure the success of companies or…

Abstract

Briefly reviews previous literature by the author before presenting an original 12 step system integration protocol designed to ensure the success of companies or countries in their efforts to develop and market new products. Looks at the issues from different strategic levels such as corporate, international, military and economic. Presents 31 case studies, including the success of Japan in microchips to the failure of Xerox to sell its invention of the Alto personal computer 3 years before Apple: from the success in DNA and Superconductor research to the success of Sunbeam in inventing and marketing food processors: and from the daring invention and production of atomic energy for survival to the successes of sewing machine inventor Howe in co‐operating on patents to compete in markets. Includes 306 questions and answers in order to qualify concepts introduced.

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Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 12 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2017

José Luis Larrea, Mari Jose Aranguren and Jesús M. Valdaliso

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the role of leadership in the design and implementation of territorial strategies for competitiveness. It attempts to address two…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the role of leadership in the design and implementation of territorial strategies for competitiveness. It attempts to address two research questions: first, how leadership is influenced by theory and the other way around, how theory is transformed through leadership; and second, what characteristics of leadership are most important to successfully implement territorial strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a case study of the life experience of an individual who has worked in positions of high responsibility in the government, the private sector and at the university. It is based on first-person action research combined with the contrast of two other co-authors.

Findings

Three findings may be highlighted from this case study. First, the importance of having leaders learning from their own process of leadership and co-evolving with the need for transformation which requires territorial strategies at every moment. Second, the necessity of having leaders whose objectives are aligned with those of the territory. Third, that individual leadership must have three characteristics to implement successfully territorial strategies: a balance between the individual and the collective objectives, a systemic vision and a consciousness of one’s own role in the system and a multi-level dimension.

Originality/value

Although territorial strategies are becoming increasingly popular both in the academia and in the policy arena, one of their critical elements, the role of individuals and that of leadership in general have not been addressed neither by scholars nor by practitioners. This paper attempts to explore the role of leadership through a case study based on the life experience of an outstanding individual in one of the regions with the longest tradition on territorial strategies for competitiveness.

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Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2013

Michael Harvey, James B. Shaw, Ruth McPhail and Anthony Erickson

The purpose of the development of the paper was due to the seemingly endless searching for deans to replace the former dean of three to four years.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the development of the paper was due to the seemingly endless searching for deans to replace the former dean of three to four years.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper was developed around the present relevant secondary data.

Findings

The key findings of the paper were that deans were being replaced due to the difference in expectation of the various constituents (e.g. students, faculty, administration, parents) in the performance of the SBA.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of the study were not providing primary data to support the theory based hypotheses of the study.

Practical implications

Deans need to recognize that there will be conflicting expectations relative to the performance of the dean and that deans have a very short time to effectuate change in academic organizations.

Social implications

Not having such high turnover in dean's positions should provide the stability of management to bring about change need in institutions of higher education.

Originality/value

Identification of key mistakes made by deans as well as the mistakes made by faculty undermine the performance of deans.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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