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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/EUM0000000000607. When citing the…

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Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/EUM0000000000607. When citing the article, please cite: Michael Howley, (1990), “Criteria for Success in New Product Development for Consumer Goods: A Comparative Study”, European Journal of Marketing, Vol. 24 Iss: 4, pp. 55 - 60.

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1998

Michael Howley and Hayley Myers

This article describes a study which is being undertaken by the authors of the adoption processes used by UK retailers in the case of new wine and spirit products…

Abstract

This article describes a study which is being undertaken by the authors of the adoption processes used by UK retailers in the case of new wine and spirit products. Following a literature review they outline the work of earlier researchers in deducing the factors which retailers, in general, consider in deciding whether or not to stock a new product. The principal factors are found to be consumer demand, compatibility with existing merchandise, financial criteria and manufacturer's support for the product The article also highlights the increasing concentration of buyer power in the UK grocery market.

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Tim Knowles and David Egan

This article charts the major structural changes that have occurred in both UK brewing and pub retailing during the period 1989–2000. A key theme has been the rapid…

Abstract

This article charts the major structural changes that have occurred in both UK brewing and pub retailing during the period 1989–2000. A key theme has been the rapid consolidation of the brewing sector in an attempt to achieve economies of scale in production, distribution and marketing. The dominance of the national brewers has allowed them to place increased product emphasis on marketing and me power of brands — particularly lager, me national breweries control all me major lager brands. In tandem with these brewers, me growth and dominance of me national pub chains has garnered apace over the past ten years and in order to maximise profit margins they have established supply arrangements with me national brewers; it has been in the interests of these chains to limit choice thereby maximising the discounts received from their suppliers. The article therefore shows that regional and local brewers cannot compete on price. Competition between pubs is also highlighted. Because beer prices are relatively inelastic, emphasis is placed on the level of amenities provided in pubs, and in particular the branding of pub outlets. Key among these amenities is the provision of food, which now accounts for a substantial percentage of total pub sales.

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Michael Howley

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364

Abstract

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Michael Howley

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609

Abstract

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1991

Michael Howley

The increase in the number of MBAs in the UK and therationalisation and restructuring of British companies mean that an MBAalone is not enough to guarantee a successful…

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587

Abstract

The increase in the number of MBAs in the UK and the rationalisation and restructuring of British companies mean that an MBA alone is not enough to guarantee a successful career, particularly in one company. The evidence indicates that MBAs must be prepared to find new employment when necessary. A review is given of the bodies which can provide help in this respect: recruitment agencies; executive search firms; outplacement consultancies; the business schools; and career management consultants. It is suggested that the most obvious source of advice is career management consultants; the cost of their services is relatively low compared with the total cost of obtaining the MBA itself.

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International Journal of Career Management, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6214

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1990

Michael Howley

A very high proportion of new consumer products fail to reach theirsales targets and are withdrawn. This is despite apparently rigorous andexpensive testing procedures…

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1276

Abstract

A very high proportion of new consumer products fail to reach their sales targets and are withdrawn. This is despite apparently rigorous and expensive testing procedures prior to launch. In this article the launch of two alcoholic beverage products in the UK is studied. One was a success while the other was a failure and the reasons for both cases are examined. What emerges is that it is dangerous to cut corners in the accepted testing techniques for new products.

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European Journal of Marketing, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Michael Howley

In the new product development (NPD) literature, little attention has been paid to the use of external marketing consultancies in the process. This work describes a study…

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2550

Abstract

In the new product development (NPD) literature, little attention has been paid to the use of external marketing consultancies in the process. This work describes a study, using both personal and telephone interviewing, of 50 British‐based consumer goods companies with a view to identifying the organisational structures they used for NPD. The study focused on the use of specialist NPD marketing consultancies in order to try and establish why successful companies regularly used such consultancies even though they already had their own marketing departments. It was found that the most common reason given for the use of consultancies was to bring in an objective view, from outside the company engaged in development, to work on NPD decisions. Even sophisticated companies found it valuable to employ consultants who could operate with detachment from day‐to‐day business issues and company politics.

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Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 11 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

Matthew Beale and Michael Howley

Studies the development in the UK of the market for no‐and low‐alcohol beers and lagers (NAB/LABs) since the late 1970s. Shows from annual sales figures for the total…

Abstract

Studies the development in the UK of the market for no‐and low‐alcohol beers and lagers (NAB/LABs) since the late 1970s. Shows from annual sales figures for the total market and of advertising expenditures how the growth of the market has been related to levels of promotional investment. Also shows the extent to which British brewers have tried to climb on board the NAB/LAB bandwagon and as a result have introduced a profusion of products, most of them without serious promotional support, and many of them of dubious quality. Takes the view that if the NAB/LAB sector is to grow into a sizeable part of the UK beer market then a rationalization of products should occur and products that continue should be well‐supported and of high quality.

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Michael Howley and Nicola Young

Attempts to quantify the impact of de‐alcoholized, low and reduced‐alcohol wines on the UK wine market, from their appearance in the late 1980s, to the present day. Also…

Abstract

Attempts to quantify the impact of de‐alcoholized, low and reduced‐alcohol wines on the UK wine market, from their appearance in the late 1980s, to the present day. Also assesses whether makers have been successful with the wines under discussion in their aim to capture a substantial percentage of the total wine market, examining the roles which the consumer and the marketing industry have played in the product and market development, and subsequently the wine's success or failure in attaining its goals. Particularly examines the role marketing may have to play in the future, if these products are to sustain market growth and finally gain acceptability as a purchase in their own right.

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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