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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2021

Jennifer A. Harrison, Marie-Hélène Budworth and Michael Halinski

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of trait gratitude on job search behaviour (preparatory and active) for job seekers approaching graduation. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of trait gratitude on job search behaviour (preparatory and active) for job seekers approaching graduation. The mediating role of perceived employability is examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from job seekers (n = 143) in their final month of study in two waves with a one-month time lag between first and second data collection.

Findings

Structural equation modelling analyses revealed that trait gratitude was significantly and positively associated with perceived employability. Perceived employability mediated the relationship between trait gratitude and preparatory job search, but not active job search.

Research limitations/implications

This study extends research on job search by highlighting the applicability of trait gratitude to the job search process.

Practical implications

Career counsellors should consider trait gratitude as relevant for program development to address the self-regulation of personal resources during job search.

Originality/value

This study is the first step towards connecting trait gratitude to the job search literature. The study identifies trait gratitude as a distal personal resource important for self-regulation of a proximal personal resource (i.e. perceived employability) and subsequent job search behaviour.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 November 2019

Michael Halinski and Linda Duxbury

Drawing from the workplace flexibility and coping literatures, the purpose of this paper is to re-conceptualize the workplace flexibility construct as a coping resource…

1036

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing from the workplace flexibility and coping literatures, the purpose of this paper is to re-conceptualize the workplace flexibility construct as a coping resource that may help prevent work-interferes-with-family (WIF) from arising and/or assist employees manage such interference when it has occurred. A measure capturing this re-conceptualized view of flexibility is developed and tested using two samples of dual-income employees with dependent care demands.

Design/methodology/approach

In Study 1, the authors use LISERL to develop and test a new multi-dimensional measure of workplace flexibility (n1=6,659). In Study 2 (n2=947), the authors use partial least squares, a component-based structural equation modeling technique, to test a model that posits workplace flexibility that helps employees cope with WIF.

Findings

This research provides support for the idea that workplace flexibility helps employees cope with WIF by: preventing interference (i.e. negatively moderating the relationship between work hours and WIF), and managing interference that has occurred (i.e. negatively moderating relationship between WIF and perceived stress).

Originality/value

This study highlights the complexity of the relationship between workplace flexibility and work-to-family interference and offers guidelines on how employers and employees can use the workplace flexibility measure developed in this study.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 August 2020

Michael Halinski and Jennifer A. Harrison

This study investigates the moderating role of employee office location in the relationship between support-related job resources (i.e. organizational support for…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the moderating role of employee office location in the relationship between support-related job resources (i.e. organizational support for development, supervisor support) and work engagement among public sector employees.

Design/methodology/approach

An online questionnaire was completed by 2,206 digital services branch of public service employees in Canada. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to test office location as a moderator of job resources and work engagement.

Findings

The results indicate that office location moderates the relationship between organizational support for development and work engagement, such that this relationship is stronger for head office employees. Conversely, results show office location moderates the relationship between supervisor support and work engagement, such that this relationship is stronger for regional office employees.

Research limitations/implications

The questionnaire was self-report in nature and from a single department. Future research should consider multiple sources of reporting and additional departments.

Practical implications

The current study suggests that to increase work engagement, public sector organizations need to offer head office employees more organizational support for development and regional employees more supervisor support.

Originality/value

The literature on public sector work engagement tends to study job resources as having universal effects on work engagement regardless of employees' place of work. This study suggests that certain resources matter more depending on office location.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 33 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Linda Duxbury and Michael Halinski

The aging of the workforce and the impending labour force shortage at the skilled end of the labour market increases the need for organizations to understand how to…

2262

Abstract

Purpose

The aging of the workforce and the impending labour force shortage at the skilled end of the labour market increases the need for organizations to understand how to “re-engage” older workers with low commitment and reduce the turnover intentions of committed older knowledge workers. The current study addresses this issue by using employee commitment and intent to turnover scores to classify older knowledge workers into four groups: Disengaged-Exiters, Engaged-High-Performers, Retired-on-the-Job and Exiting-Performers. The purpose of this paper is to identify a set of work factors and practices that predispose older knowledge workers to fall into one or another of the four groups and offer suggestions on how organizations can increase commitment and decrease intent to turnover of their older workers.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper used survey data (n=5,588) from a Canadian national study on work, family and caregiving to test the framework. Data analysis was performed using a MANCOVA with one independent variable (Boomer group), four dependent variables (job satisfaction, non-supportive culture, supportive manager, work-role overload) and one covariate (gender).

Findings

The results support the framework. The findings suggest organizations that wish to retain committed Baby Boomers need to address issues with respect to workload. Alternatively, organizations who wish to increase the commitment levels of Boomers who have “Retired-on-the-Job” need to focus on supportive management, organizational culture and career development.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature on organizational commitment and intent to turnover by re-conceptualizing the relationship between these traditional concepts.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 October 2015

Michael Halinski and Linda Duxbury

– The purpose of this paper is to examine how the group decision-making process unfolds over time in a transorganizational system (TS) planning change.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the group decision-making process unfolds over time in a transorganizational system (TS) planning change.

Design/methodology/approach

A longitudinal qualitative case study was designed to enable researchers to identify different stages in the group decision-making process.

Findings

The findings from this case study indicated that the group decision-making process in a TS planning change could be conceptualized to include five distinct steps: working in solitude; starting a dialogue; finding a common goal; suggesting decision alternatives; and deciding among alternatives. The group proceeded through these steps sequentially over time.

Practical implications

The paper offers TS practitioners a framework to follow when making group decisions within TSs.

Originality/value

The study develops a conceptual framework that describes how the group decision-making process unfolds over time in a TS planning change. This framework can be tested in other contexts and advance theory in both the TS and group decision-making areas.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 53 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Carla C.J.M. Millar and Vicki Culpin

The purpose of this paper is to provide an update of the Special Issue's field of research, give the structure of the Special Issue and introduce the papers in the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an update of the Special Issue's field of research, give the structure of the Special Issue and introduce the papers in the collection, including management issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the Call for Papers and further research and a presentation of papers in the Special Issue paying attention to original contribution, research and management recommendations.

Findings

This Special Issue is making a solid contribution to the field in not only addressing ageing and the ageing generation, but focusing strongly on the way both the ageing generation and other generations such as Gen Y and Gen X affect organisational dynamics, structure and career management.

Originality/value

Original research brought together in a multi-faceted way outlining the challenges as well as management agendas for the organisation.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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