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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Michael H. Shenkman

Succession is a stated priority for many CEOs. Yet, many executives let the time it takes to select and groom a successor slip away. Shenkman shows why this happens…

Abstract

Succession is a stated priority for many CEOs. Yet, many executives let the time it takes to select and groom a successor slip away. Shenkman shows why this happens: mentoring, the best method of developing in‐house talent, take a completely different mindset from the one executives use to drive results and success in an organization. Mentoring requires attentive, slow and subtle listening skills, forgiving (even fostering) mistakes, and bringing bad news. None of these are skills fostered in the production‐oriented drive toward managerial prowess. Adapting observations detailed in his book, The Arch and the Path: The Life of Leading Greatly, Shenkman applies lessons garnered from more than 25 years in executive coaching and mentoring, as well as detailed research on the dynamics of becoming, discovering and cultivating leaders. The only way for executives to shift to a mentoring mindset is to add a new skill: that is, learn mentoring and practice it.

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Handbook of Business Strategy, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1077-5730

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Michael H. Shenkman

Gwen, an executive that I mentor, was in the process of carving out a business of her own. We met in an outdoor café, on a beautiful spring day in Albuquerque. I like to…

Abstract

Gwen, an executive that I mentor, was in the process of carving out a business of her own. We met in an outdoor café, on a beautiful spring day in Albuquerque. I like to meet my clients in settings such as this now and then as these places sometimes relax them and free up the conversation. On this day, Gwen took full advantage of the setting. She brought a sketchbook with her, containing the artwork she had done during a course she had just completed.

Details

Handbook of Business Strategy, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1077-5730

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Article
Publication date: 22 May 2007

Abstract

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

William W. McCartney and Constance R. Campbell

This paper examines the relationship among leadership skills, management skills and individual success and failure in formal organizations.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the relationship among leadership skills, management skills and individual success and failure in formal organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

A model is presented depicting the interactive relationship among the three variables and explaining why some high potential employees suffer derailment while other individuals with similar skills continue to develop and achieve organizational success.

Findings

The model indicates that there is not one combination of management and leadership skills related to individual success.

Practical implications

Developmental activities should be ongoing regardless of the individual's level in the organization.

Originality/value

This paper synthesizes several streams of research into a coherent model that can be used as a guide for leadership development activities.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Book part
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Minsun Ji

This chapter examines the labor-empowerment potential of emerging taxi driver cooperative-union partnerships. Cooperative-union partnerships can adopt differing stances…

Abstract

This chapter examines the labor-empowerment potential of emerging taxi driver cooperative-union partnerships. Cooperative-union partnerships can adopt differing stances toward the virtue of waging broad-based, class-conscious conflict against economic elites to win economic change, as opposed to the virtue of small-scale and practical steps to improve the immediate conditions of individual “job-conscious” workers. This case study utilizes a “class consciousness” versus “job consciousness” framework to examine a recent immigrant taxi driver union-cooperative partnership.

Case study of taxi driver organizing in Denver (CO), utilizing narrative inquiry, and survey and interviews with 69 drivers.

The US tradition of accommodational job consciousness continues to influence union and cooperative leaders. Among Denver’s taxi cooperatives, an emphasis on accommodational job consciousness, bereft of class perspectives, has undermined a narrative promoting worker solidarity or encouraging workers to engage in social justice campaigns for immigrant workers. The consequence has been to weaken the transformational potential of taxi driver activism.

Findings based on a single case study need to be confirmed through additional research.

Cooperative-union partnerships that adopt a class-conscious political approach, including leadership development opportunities, a “labor empowerment curriculum, and partnerships with broader social movements, are a promising alternative to narrowly tailored “job conscious” organizing strategies.

Immigrants are increasingly forming worker cooperatives, and the recent Denver taxi driver union-cooperative is one of the largest taxi cooperatives in the country. Current research on the labor empowerment consequences of these emerging immigrant cooperatives is sparse.

Details

Employee Ownership and Employee Involvement at Work: Case Studies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-520-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

David Walters

The respective roles of marketing and operations management in contributing to effective strategy are considered. This article considers both the technological…

Abstract

The respective roles of marketing and operations management in contributing to effective strategy are considered. This article considers both the technological developments and the changes in management perspectives. Technology has presented management with increased flexibility in the strategic positions available. Some argue (Porter, 1996) that technological developments have been viewed as opportunities to increase productivity rather than to shift the organisations strategic direction. An increasing application of value as a customer requirement has resulted in a corporate value proposition: a statement of how superior value is to be created and delivered. Operations strategy has typically been described as being supportive (to the overall organisational strategy) or exceptionally as a major element of an organisations competitive advantage. A number of authors have identified operations strategies which link manufacturing operations and strategic management. A missing link is an exploration of the marketing/operations interface and how this may lead to an effective value based strategy.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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