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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

Todd E. Rockoff and Michael Groves

Outlines the principle of the Dutch auction, whereby the price begins at a high level and decreases by steps until a bid is made. Describes an integrated hardware and…

Abstract

Outlines the principle of the Dutch auction, whereby the price begins at a high level and decreases by steps until a bid is made. Describes an integrated hardware and software system which uses Internet communications to enable remotely created bidders to participate in real‐time Dutch auctions and which meets the stringent requirement that synchrony be maintained among bidders’ terminals to ensure that each bidder has a fair chance to bid at the current offer price. Defines the principal functions of the system and characterizes its available resources. Illustrates implementation using a prototype design. Pays particular attention to bidder terminal synchronization, bidder authentication, and auction client security. Includes the possibility of a system variant using ISDN interconnect and PC‐based bidders’ terminals.

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Internet Research, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2013

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Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 42 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1981

Michael Afolabi, Mike Cornford, Lorna Roberts, Joe Hendry, David Radmore, Michael Greenhalgh and Wilfred Ashworth

THE Department of Library Science at Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria was founded in 1968. Its foundation is regarded as an offspring of the Sharr report of 1963…

Abstract

THE Department of Library Science at Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria was founded in 1968. Its foundation is regarded as an offspring of the Sharr report of 1963. The department was formerly known as the Department of Librarianship until the 1971/72 session when the name was changed to the present one. Its objective is the training of professional librarians at all levels.

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New Library World, vol. 82 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2008

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Kybernetes, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1966

AFTER some unsuccessful negotiations during the period when the first full‐time schools of librarianship were being established, the Birmingham School was founded in the…

Abstract

AFTER some unsuccessful negotiations during the period when the first full‐time schools of librarianship were being established, the Birmingham School was founded in the autumn of 1950. Circumstances were not entirely favourable—the immediate post‐war generation of enthusiastic ex‐service students had already passed through other schools; the accommodation available was indifferent; the administrative support was bad; resources were weak, both in books and in equipment. There was, more importantly, a strong local tradition of part‐time classes in librarianship and little or no conviction that full‐time study was necessary or desirable.

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New Library World, vol. 67 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2003

Edward Finch

Abstract

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Facilities, vol. 21 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2018

Bart Penders

The purpose of this paper is to critically engage with societal origins of public (dis)trust and public credibility of nutrition science and offer suggestions for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critically engage with societal origins of public (dis)trust and public credibility of nutrition science and offer suggestions for addressing its public dismissal.

Design/methodology/approach

This viewpoint presents a conceptual analysis of public dismissal of nutrition science, drawing together perspectives on the relationships between science and society from the history, sociology and philosophy of science.

Findings

The origin of trust amongst scientists relies is actively tied to their social and moral status and science as a cultural activity is inextricably linked to institutions of power. Accordingly, trust in science relies heavily on public perceptions of those institutions, the ways in which citizens feel represented by them, and to what extent citizens consider these institutions to be held accountable. Ignoring this origin leads to expectations of science and scientists they cannot live up to and inevitable disappointment in those holding such expectations.

Social implications

Managing responsible expectations asks that we first dismiss dominant portrayals of science as pure, neutral, value-free and fuelled by curiosity. Second, we should pursue a reorganisation of science, favouring social inclusiveness over scientific exceptionalism.

Originality/value

Post-truth dynamics are a source of concern in the dissemination of nutrition science. Rather than dismissing it as a consequence of public ignorance, a comprehensive engagement with post-truth arguments allows a constructive repositioning of nutrition science organisation and communication. It asks that we design research programmes and studies differently, incorporate different voices. Above all else, it asks humility of researchers and tolerant approaches to other perspectives.

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British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2008

Malcolm Brady and Aidan Walsh

The paper examines the process by which the strategic direction of an organization is set. The paper asks if strategic direction is defined and set at the top of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper examines the process by which the strategic direction of an organization is set. The paper asks if strategic direction is defined and set at the top of the organization and then trickled down or is it set by members making their own decisions based on well‐known rules and the organization's strategic direction is the aggregation of these decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

Individual in‐depth semi‐structured interviews were carried out with members of a professional services organization.

Findings

The research suggests that an agent‐based approach may more closely represent the process of strategic direction setting for certain kinds of firm than does the traditional text‐book trickle down approach.

Research limitations/implications

The research was carried out on a legal services firm. Future extensions of the research could be to other kinds of large professional services firms, for example accountancy practices.

Practical implications

While this research was carried out on a professional services firm the findings could be appropriate to other kinds of organization in the knowledge economy where individual agents carried out non‐routine tasks or tasks that require substantial individual judgment, for example: universities or research centers.

Originality/value

The usual text book model of strategy formulation and implementation suggests that strategy is defined by top management with objectives cascaded down through the organization. This research suggests an alternative approach where individual agents in the organization make decisions according to given rules and that the strategic direction of the organization is determined by the aggregation of these decisions. This suggests a new role for top managers as rule‐makers rather than objective‐setters.

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Business Strategy Series, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2017

Sayan Chatterjee

This case study of the strategy of the U.S. grocery chain, ALDI, shows how businesses can use a systematic process to develop and iteratively refine the core strategy…

Abstract

Purpose

This case study of the strategy of the U.S. grocery chain, ALDI, shows how businesses can use a systematic process to develop and iteratively refine the core strategy powering their business model.”

Design/methodology/approach

The case describes how ALDI, the upstart entrant established a foothold, a strategy stumble by Walmart, the market leader, provided the newcomer with an attractive opportunity to expand its competitive reach into more upscale neighborhoods.

Findings

Aldi is continuing to build a business model that allowes it to price its products at an order of magnitude below other grocers and also develop a reputation for private label quality that has ultimately enabled it to challenge leading discount grocers.

Social implications

Some analysts expect a significant number of supermarket war casualties–more grocery store bankruptcies and liquidations over the next few years.

Originality/value

ALDI has begun a campaign to offer its customers more value at even lower prices. Other foreign entrants sense their moment has arrived to leap into the fray now that giant Walmart finally seems open to attack. Amazon is experimenting with grocery selling. Recent chain store news headlines tell the breaking story: “Supermarket Wars!”

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 45 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

George K. Chako

Briefly reviews previous literature by the author before presenting an original 12 step system integration protocol designed to ensure the success of companies or…

Abstract

Briefly reviews previous literature by the author before presenting an original 12 step system integration protocol designed to ensure the success of companies or countries in their efforts to develop and market new products. Looks at the issues from different strategic levels such as corporate, international, military and economic. Presents 31 case studies, including the success of Japan in microchips to the failure of Xerox to sell its invention of the Alto personal computer 3 years before Apple: from the success in DNA and Superconductor research to the success of Sunbeam in inventing and marketing food processors: and from the daring invention and production of atomic energy for survival to the successes of sewing machine inventor Howe in co‐operating on patents to compete in markets. Includes 306 questions and answers in order to qualify concepts introduced.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 12 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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