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Advanced Modeling for Transit Operations and Service Planning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-585-47522-6

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Article
Publication date: 9 September 2014

Michael Winkler, Kai Michael Höver and Max Mühlhäuser

The purpose of this study is to present a depth information-based solution for automatic camera control, depending on the presenter’s moving positions. Talks…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to present a depth information-based solution for automatic camera control, depending on the presenter’s moving positions. Talks, presentations and lectures are often captured on video to give a broad audience the possibility to (re-)access the content. As presenters are often moving around during a talk, it is necessary to steer recording cameras.

Design/methodology/approach

We use depth information from Kinect to implement a prototypical application to automatically steer multiple cameras for recording a talk.

Findings

We present our experiences with the system during actual lectures at a university. We found out that Kinect is applicable for tracking a presenter during a talk robustly. Nevertheless, our prototypical solution reveals potential for improvements, which we discuss in our future work section.

Originality/value

Tracking a presenter is based on a skeleton model extracted from depth information instead of using two-dimensional (2D) motion- or brightness-based image processing techniques. The solution uses a scalable networking architecture based on publish/subscribe messaging for controlling multiple video cameras.

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Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Duong Trong Hue, Linda Brennan, Lukas Parker and Michael Florian

– This paper aims to elucidate perceptions of safe driving and social norms in relation to driving motorbikes in the Vietnamese context.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to elucidate perceptions of safe driving and social norms in relation to driving motorbikes in the Vietnamese context.

Design/methodology/approach

A series of focus groups was undertaken in relation to driving practices from a number of groups: adolescents, families and adult males and females. The discussion centred on how driving behaviours were socialised within the various groups.

Findings

The research highlighted some very interesting social dynamics in relation to how safe driving habits are established and supported within the social context. In particular, the separation of descriptive and injunctive norms and the role such norms play in socialising driving behaviours, safe or otherwise.

Practical implications

The implications for social marketing practice are considerable, especially in the Vietnamese context where injunctive norms are difficult to portray, given the dynamics of the media landscape. Social marketing campaigns will need to have a broader consideration of how to establish descriptive norms, bearing in mind the social milieu in which the behaviours occur.

Originality/value

This research is the first of its kind in the Vietnamese context. While much practice-led innovation is occurring in the region, there is little extant research on the topic of social norms and the socialisation of behaviours within the Southeast Asian region.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2020

El murabet Amina, Abtoy Anouar, Touhafi Abdellah and Tahiri Abderahim

AAL (Ambient Assisted Living) is lacking a RM (Reference Model) to serve as an abstraction of the domain. Therefore, to help implement new architectures established on the…

Abstract

AAL (Ambient Assisted Living) is lacking a RM (Reference Model) to serve as an abstraction of the domain. Therefore, to help implement new architectures established on the prior experiences of the designer’s expertise and former competences, in this paper, we propose a novel approach of an AAL RM. Our objective is to handle the resolution of conflicts that appear between the developers, and give an overview of the basis for implementing concrete software architectures for different families of AAL applications. Our proposed RM is a standardized clarification for developers to apply in the process of the design and implementation. We illuminate the AAL domain fundamental dimensions and we established a formal RM with an infrastructure that could survive the domain’s progression. To achieve integrated system-of-systems composed of systems, subsystems and components, our RM describes a standard and regulated structure to be established. High-level elements, essential properties and characteristics that must appear in the application’s design are described and illustrated in this work.

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Applied Computing and Informatics, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2634-1964

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Luciano Morganti, Andrea Renda and Kristina Irion

Abstract

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info, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Abstract

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Economic Complexity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44451-433-2

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Carlo Alberto Avizzano

Abstract

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Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 38 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 19 December 2016

Florian Feldwieser, Michael Marchollek, Markus Meis, Matthias Gietzelt and Elisabeth Steinhagen-Thiessen

Senior citizen falls are one of the highest-cost factors of healthcare within this population group. Various approaches for automatic fall detection exist. However, little…

Abstract

Purpose

Senior citizen falls are one of the highest-cost factors of healthcare within this population group. Various approaches for automatic fall detection exist. However, little is known about the seniors’ acceptance of these systems. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the acceptance of automatic fall detection devices as well as the technological commitment and the health status in community-dwelling adults with a predefined risk of falling.

Design/methodology/approach

Seniors with a risk of falling were equipped with either an accelerometer or an accelerometer with an additional visual and optical fall detection system in a sub-group of the study population for a period of eight weeks. Pre- and post-study questionnaires were used to assess attitudes and acceptance toward technology.

Findings

In total, 14 subjects with a mean age of 75.1 years completed the study. Acceptance toward all sensors was high and subjects were confident in their ability to handle technology. Medical assessments showed only very mild physical and no mental impairments. Measures that assured subjects privacy protection were welcomed. Sensor technology should be as unobtrusive as possible.

Originality/value

Privacy protection and uncomplicated use of the fall detection equipment led to high acceptance in seniors with high-technical commitment and good health status. Issues to further improve acceptance could be identified. Future research on different populations is necessary.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

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Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2015

Michael Phillips and Stephen Cranby

In contrast to the ‘bell-curve thinking’ which can shape many teachers’ assumptions of student ability (Fendler, L., & Muzaffar, I. (2008). The history of the bell curve…

Abstract

In contrast to the ‘bell-curve thinking’ which can shape many teachers’ assumptions of student ability (Fendler, L., & Muzaffar, I. (2008). The history of the bell curve: Sorting and the idea of normal. Educational Theory, 58(1), 63–82.; Florian & Black-Hawkins, 2011; Thomas, G., & Loxley, A. (2007). Deconstructing special education and constructing inclusion. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill International.), some researchers have been examining the ways in which teachers can shift their deterministic understandings of student capacities (see, Graham, A. (2014). Embodiment of knowledge and inclusive pedagogy.; Spratt, J., & Florian, L. (2014). Developing and using a framework for gauging the use of inclusive pedagogy by new and experienced teachers. In C. Forlin, T. Loreman (Eds.), Measuring inclusive education (Vol. 3, pp. 263–278). International Perspectives on Inclusive Education. Bingley, UK: Emerald Group Publishing Limited.). Despite the adverse effects on student self-efficacy and performance (Fraser, S. (1995). The bell curve wars: Race, intelligence, and the future of America. New York, NY: Basic Books.) that can result from teachers’ assumptions about students’ ability, evidence of teachers’ inclusive education practices can be difficult to find (Forlin, C. (2010). Teacher education for inclusion: Changing paradigms and innovative approaches. London: Routledge.; Jones, P. (2013). Bringing insider perspectives into inclusive teacher learning: Potentials and challenges for educational professionals. London: Routledge.). This chapter begins to address the lack of evidence of inclusive educational practices in some Geography classrooms. The chapter begins by providing an overview of literature which outlines how the development and sharing of pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) can enhance effective inclusive practices in Geography classrooms. In contrast to many previous considerations of PCK as a teacher-focussed, individual attribute, this chapter presents an argument that the development of communal or distributed PCK in Geography classrooms can not only enhance creative ways for all students to participate in classroom life but also creates a sense of interdependence between teachers and students to create new knowledge, which in turn links to notions of identity development and inclusive practices. Finally, this chapter presents examples of ways in which Geography teachers can enact inclusive pedagogical approaches in both primary and secondary school contexts.

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