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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2012

Weiguo Sheng, Gareth Howells, Michael Fairhurst, Farzin Deravi and Shengyong Chen

Biometric authentication, which requires storage of biometric templates and/or encryption keys, raises a matter of serious concern, since the compromise of templates or…

Abstract

Purpose

Biometric authentication, which requires storage of biometric templates and/or encryption keys, raises a matter of serious concern, since the compromise of templates or keys necessarily compromises the information secured by those keys. To address such concerns, efforts based on dynamic key generation directly from the biometrics have recently emerged. However, previous methods often have quite unacceptable authentication performance and/or small key spaces and therefore are not viable in practice. The purpose of this paper is to propose a novel method which can reliably generate long keys while requires storage of neither biometric templates nor encryption keys.

Design/methodology/approach

This proposition is achieved by devising the use of fingerprint orientation fields for key generation. Additionally, the keys produced are not permanently linked to the orientation fields, hence, allowing them to be replaced in the event of key compromise.

Findings

The evaluation demonstrates that the proposed method for dynamic key generation can offer both good reliability and security in practice, and outperforms other related methods.

Originality/value

In this paper, the authors propose a novel method which can reliably generate long keys while requires storage of neither biometric templates nor encryption keys. This is achieved by devising the use of fingerprint orientation fields for key generation. Additionally, the keys produced are not permanently linked to the orientation fields, hence, allowing them to be replaced in the event of key compromise.

Details

Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 July 1999

B.H. Rudall

Abstract

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 June 2011

R. Michael Bokeno

Abstract

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2019

Ofelia Brown, Carmen Paz-Aparicio and Antonio J. Revilla

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the impact of a leader’s communication style (LCS) on the quality of interpersonal exchanges between leaders and followers (LMX)…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the impact of a leader’s communication style (LCS) on the quality of interpersonal exchanges between leaders and followers (LMX), and how this translates into the employee’s affective organizational commitment (AOC), in the context of Peru.

Design/methodology/approach

An integrated model of six dimensions is used to measure LCS. Using multiple hierarchical regressions and the Preacher and Hayes mediation model, the study focuses on determining the direct and indirect effect of each of the dimensions on LMX and organizational commitment.

Findings

The dimension preciseness shows a significant direct association to AOC. Four dimensions are significantly related with LMX: expressiveness, preciseness and questioningness with a positive sign, while verbal aggressiveness records an important negative one. The same four dimensions show an indirect effect on AOC through LMX. Emotionality and impression manipulativeness do not record significant results.

Research limitations/implications

The research was carried out with a sample of 253 white-collar Peruvian professionals with high-level studies and managerial experience, which are not necessarily representative of the labor population. This research provides comprehensive evidence on how leaders’ communicative behavior may contribute to desirable outcomes such as employee commitment in a Latin American cultural context, although the findings may apply to other cultures.

Practical implications

This study contributes to clarify that each dimension of the LCS impacts differently on subordinate perceptions; leaders should understand this model and be able to make the necessary adjustments to their communication in order to obtain the desired results of leadership. The leader’s ability to communicate with a style characterized by expressiveness, precision, and questioning makes it easy to build high-quality LMX relationships for Peruvian employees. On the contrary, a communication style characterized by high levels of verbal aggressiveness may negatively affect subordinates, limiting the possibility of building high-quality LMX relationships. This, in turn, affects AOC of employees.

Social implications

This study is a contribution to clarify that each feature of the LCS has a different impact on the perception of the subordinate, for which the leaders should be trained to understand this model and be able to make the necessary adjustments to obtain the desired results of leadership. The leader’s ability to communicate with a style characterized by expressiveness, precision and questioning makes it easy to build high-quality LMX relationships for Peruvian employees. On the contrary, a communication style characterized by high levels of verbal aggressiveness will negatively impact subordinates, limiting the possibility of building high-quality LMX relationships.

Originality/value

The value lies in revisiting the construct “leader’s communication style” to turn it into an instrument for the exercise of leadership. It is a contribution in favor of leaders becoming aware that their own communication style constitutes an instrument of effective leadership and a lever to optimize the commitment of their collaborators toward the organization.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 13 April 2021

Michael J. Urick

Abstract

Details

A Manager's Guide to Using the Force: Leadership Lessons from a Galaxy Far Far Away
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-233-1

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Brad Jackson, Matthew Nicoll and Michael J. Roy

The purpose of this study is to present a systematic assessment of the distinctive challenges and opportunities associated with creating leadership within the realm of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to present a systematic assessment of the distinctive challenges and opportunities associated with creating leadership within the realm of social enterprise. A modified and expanded form of Grint’s leadership lenses heuristic framework (i.e. person, position, process, performance, purpose and place) is used to examine and highlight what is particular about creating leadership in social enterprises by virtue of their distinctive missions, strategic contexts, legal forms and organisational structures and cultures. Based on this initial exploration, five research priorities are identified to better understand and then develop leadership practice in the social enterprise realm.

Design/methodology/approach

An enhanced heuristic framework for systematically examining leadership within the social enterprise research literature has been applied, drawing on the leadership practice literature. The application is illustrated through six instrumental case studies.

Findings

While there are a number of similarities between leading in the social enterprise realm and leading within the private, public and not-for-profit sectors, the levels of complexity, ambiguity and the lack of an established theoretical and practical knowledge base makes creating leadership in the social enterprise sector that much more challenging. On the positive side of the ledger, the fact that the purpose is at the core of social enterprise means that it is relatively easier to use the purpose to create a basis for common meaningful action, compared to leadership within the private and public sectors. Related to this, given the strongly local or “glocal” nature of social enterprise, a ready opportunity exists for leaders to draw upon a place as a strategic resource in mobilising followers and other stakeholders. The novel, uncertain and pioneering nature of a social enterprise is also arguably more tolerant and accommodating of a leadership mindset that focuses on posing questions regarding “wicked” problems compared to public, private for-profit and, indeed, traditional not-for-profit sector organisations.

Originality/value

As far as we can ascertain, this is the first systematic attempt to examine the distinctive challenges and opportunities associated with creating leadership within the social enterprise realm. The application of the heuristic framework leads to the identification of five key inter-related lines of empirical research into leadership practices within social enterprises.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 25 May 2021

Michael J. Urick

Abstract

Details

Leadership in Middle-Earth: Theories and Applications for Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-528-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Michael Kaye and Anne Gilpin

In the past few years, many Australian organisations have either undergone or been planning a change from a hierarchical bureaucratic culture to a team‐based one. Much…

Abstract

In the past few years, many Australian organisations have either undergone or been planning a change from a hierarchical bureaucratic culture to a team‐based one. Much faith in the potential success of this kind of change appears to have been based on stories of transformations which worked well in overseas organisations, notably Japanese and American companies. One important issue for Australian organisational leaders was to come to terms with how the cultures of local and overseas companies were similar to or different from each other. For example, if the value systems of both local and overseas organisations tended to converge rather than diverge, the probability of developing a team‐based culture in Australian companies was relatively high. This paper critically examines stories of Australian organisations which are moving to a team‐based culture, from an adult communication management perspective. In particular, the paper aims to identify communication management variables which contribute to the successful implementation of teams in those organisations. Finally, conclusions and implications are drawn for maintaining high performance in team‐based organisations through effective communication management practices. ‘The art of progress is to preserve order amid change and to preserve change amid order’ — Alfred North Whitehead.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

K.G.B. Bakewell

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes…

Abstract

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property Management Volumes 8‐18; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐18.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property…

Abstract

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property Management Volumes 8‐18; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐18.

Details

Facilities, vol. 19 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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