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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2017

Cindy L. Pressley and Michael E. Noel

Metaphors are used a great deal in theory but are not always fully explained. This paper expands on the carnival metaphor used by Boje (2001) by clarifying the type of…

Abstract

Metaphors are used a great deal in theory but are not always fully explained. This paper expands on the carnival metaphor used by Boje (2001) by clarifying the type of carnival the metaphor describes, in this case the sideshow carnival. The sideshow carnival metaphor helps to explain how emotional labor can be used to avoid situations of administrative evil that have been partially caused by the separation of mind/body of public servants operating in public space. The authors of this article illustrate the application of the sideshow carnival metaphor by showing how emergency professionals in the area of natural disaster management have become more professionalized over the last several decades. This professionalization has led to a focus on the rational mind over the emotional body. By engaging in emotional labor, emergency professionals are engaging in carnivalesque behavior that helps to repair the mind/body connection. If the connection is not repaired, the rational mind will take over and the public space wherein the emergency professional exists can co-opt the professional leading them to be unable to see the potential evil acts they might commit.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2020

Michael Browne, Peter Balan and Noel Lindsay

The business model plays a key role in the survival and success of any business. In the family business context, the business model includes more than purely economic…

Abstract

Purpose

The business model plays a key role in the survival and success of any business. In the family business context, the business model includes more than purely economic variables, and it is vital to recognise and identify these for sound business decision-making. This empirical and grounded research clarifies the nature of the business model for small family wineries and, for the first time, specifies four key non-economic or socio-emotional wealth dimensions of the business models for these enterprises.

Design/methodology/approach

The nature of business models is identified by analysing qualitative data from in-depth interviews with decision-makers in small family wineries in Australia. This was done using an abductive approach that produces maps identifying the key dimensions of their business models.

Findings

This research supports the construct of socio-emotional wealth by clarifying the non-economic sources of value in these businesses, while not ignoring economic sources of value. In particular, this grounded study identifies “being special”, “tradition”, “relationships” and “control” as key dimensions of socio-emotional value.

Research limitations/implications

This research provides empirical support for the emerging view that non-economic value should be incorporated into the business model construct. In particular, it specifies four key dimensions of socio-emotional wealth in the firm that are incorporated in a proposed empirical model of the business model of family wine businesses that is appropriate for further study. This research was carried out with cases in one industry that were as similar as possible to obtain robust findings and provides the basis for generalisation through replication in other industries and in other categories of family businesses.

Practical implications

This research has significant practical implications associated with the concept of value. The particular dimensions of value as perceived by business owners need to be considered explicitly by business owners and advisors in their strategic and operational decision-making.

Originality/value

Small family wineries represent most enterprises operating in the global wine industry. This research study provides empirical support for the role of socio-emotional wealth, or the non-economic components, in their business models. In particular, this study specifies key dimensions for socio-emotional wealth, and the findings have conceptual as well as practical value.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1963

THE high standards of examination and qualifications for membership set by the Institute of Incorporated Work Study Technologists can be seen in the new Prospectus just…

Abstract

THE high standards of examination and qualifications for membership set by the Institute of Incorporated Work Study Technologists can be seen in the new Prospectus just issued by the Institute.

Details

Work Study, vol. 12 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Michael Stevens, Allan Bird, Mark E. Mendenhall and Gary Oddou

Based on a review of multiple literatures, a comprehensive content domain of essential intercultural competencies for effective global leaders is presented. This domain is…

Abstract

Based on a review of multiple literatures, a comprehensive content domain of essential intercultural competencies for effective global leaders is presented. This domain is then used to guide the development of the Global Competencies Inventory (GCI), a 160-item self-report measure that assesses the degree to which individuals possess the intercultural competencies that are associated with global leader effectiveness. Using sample sizes ranging from several hundred to nearly 9,000 subjects, evidence from several studies is presented showing the GCI to have convergent validity, predictive validity, and freedom from demographic and ethnic subgroup biases. Implications for theory and future research are also discussed.

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2018

Vladlena Benson, Jean-Noel Ezingeard and Chris Hand

Social media users’ purchasing behaviour is yet to be fully understood by research. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how purchase intention is affected by…

Abstract

Purpose

Social media users’ purchasing behaviour is yet to be fully understood by research. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how purchase intention is affected by social media user traits, cognitive factors (such as perceived control and trust) and individual beliefs, such as risk propensity and trustworthiness.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors propose and empirically test a model of purchase intention on social platforms. The study of over 500 active social media users finds the links between risk propensity, trust, technical efficacy and perceived control and explores the moderating effect of age and gender.

Findings

Purchase intention on social platforms is influenced by demographic factors, cognitive factors and beliefs. Both age and gender moderate the effects of beliefs and cognitive factors: age is a determinant of purchase intention for men, while beliefs are significant for younger women and cognitive factors are significant for older women.

Research limitations/implications

This study involved a cross-sectional design via online survey of social networking users. Gender differences in purchase intentions are found which are, in turn, influenced by age. Further empirical testing of social purchase intention could include less experienced users or non-users.

Practical implications

The results of this study provide guidance for SNS providers and technology developers in social networking commerce in terms of the different drivers of purchase intention.

Originality/value

Social media users’ purchasing behaviour is yet to be fully understood. The study shows that purchase intention antecedents vary between genders and age groups of users. The identified connection between users’ perceptions of social networking sites (SNS) usage of personal information and purchase behaviour has an impact on the likelihood of user engagement in social transactions.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 February 2007

Dwight R. Merunka and Robert A. Peterson

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1306-6

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Abstract

Details

The Sustainability of Restorative Justice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-754-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1963

BOOKS on Work Study and its related techniques written by British authors are a mere runnel when contrasted with the literary Mississippi which flows from the American…

Abstract

BOOKS on Work Study and its related techniques written by British authors are a mere runnel when contrasted with the literary Mississippi which flows from the American presses. A new one is an event, so we are glad to welcome Michael Avery's volume on Methods Engineering which embodies some material previously contributed to this journal.

Details

Work Study, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1937

DULLNESS can be the aftermath of conferences, but Scarborough may be an exception. Some of the heat engendered at the Annual Business Meeting has indeed already…

Abstract

DULLNESS can be the aftermath of conferences, but Scarborough may be an exception. Some of the heat engendered at the Annual Business Meeting has indeed already evaporated, but its implications remain. They are these: that, while the examination system of the L.A. is to remain as it is for another two years, some revision is imperative; and the relations of the L.A. with the Association of Assistant Librarians must be so arranged that the latter can continue a distinctive existence. As for the examinations, resentment was felt not so much at the age‐limits, although these were the gravamen of the criticism against them, but against the undue severity of the Intermediate Examination, which, we are told, has delayed and impaired the careers of many quite capable young people. The severity, great as it seems in the two subjects, is increased by the requirement that both must be passed together. Only students exceptionally possessed of the examination faculty can do this, and we have the spectacle of several who have passed in each subject two or more times and yet have never been able to pass them together. The sanity of the requirement that they be passed together lies in the fact that it prevents cramming. Will anyone tell us the remedy?

Details

New Library World, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Michael Morrell and Jean‐Noël Ezingeard

For over a decade large companies have turned to supply‐chain management and inter‐organisational system‐development techniques to increase their efficiency and…

Abstract

For over a decade large companies have turned to supply‐chain management and inter‐organisational system‐development techniques to increase their efficiency and effectiveness. Smaller companies, however, have struggled to adopt and benefit from such systems, traditionally citing reasons such as a lack of financial resources and technical capability. This paper seeks to identify a framework of key variables which influence the adoption of inter‐organisational and supply‐chain systems with particular reference to smaller companies. This framework is then applied to a supply‐chain case study in the chemicals sector to consider the reality of system adoption for a small‐ to medium‐sized enterprise (SME) in the chain. The paper concludes that significant benefits are indeed attainable for the SME; however, a culturally‐rooted lack of vision and awareness are restricting adoption and the realisation of benefits associated with such systems.

Details

Logistics Information Management, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

Keywords

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