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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Hannah R. Marriott, Michael D. Williams and Yogesh K. Dwivedi

The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the mobile shopping (m-shopping) acceptance literature to bring international marketing and consumer research attention…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the mobile shopping (m-shopping) acceptance literature to bring international marketing and consumer research attention to m-shopping acceptance factors and limitations in current understandings to propose recommendations for further academic and retailing attention.

Design/methodology/approach

Keyword searches identified the consumer-focused literature across mobile commerce, m-shopping, mobile browsing and mobile purchasing, published in English language journals. A classification framework is created and a time frame is established to provide a more focused direction for research.

Findings

Despite the growing popularity of consumers adopting m-shopping activities and the increasing academic attention, consumer m-shopping utilisation remains low and research into its causes remains in its infancy. This paper has subsequently identified a variety of recommendations for further research, including further insights into perceived risk, user vs non-user behaviours, the multi-stage shopping process, incorporation of time considerations and theoretical development.

Originality/value

There has yet been a review of the m-shopping literature collaborating literary findings and limitations in the consumer m-shopping environment. Three major themes arise in this paper. First, there are a variety of factors affecting consumer willingness to accept m-shopping which are often incorporated in existing theory in a sporadic manner. Second, factors can create positive and/or negative consumer perceptions, requiring further insight. Finally, research limitations predominantly surround theoretical and methodological constraints, prompting for wider geographical and more longitudinal approaches to research.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 45 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2020

Daniel J. Rees, Victoria Bates, Roderick A. Thomas, Simon B. Brooks, Hamish Laing, Gareth H. Davies, Michael Williams, Leighton Phillips and Yogesh K. Dwivedi

The UK Government-funded National Health Service (NHS) is experiencing significant pressures because of the complexity of challenges to, and demands of, health-care…

Abstract

Purpose

The UK Government-funded National Health Service (NHS) is experiencing significant pressures because of the complexity of challenges to, and demands of, health-care provision. This situation has driven government policy level support for transformational change initiatives, such as value-based health care (VBHC), through closer alignment and collaboration across the health-care system-life science sector nexus. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the necessary antecedents to collaboration in VBHC through a critical exploration of the existing literature, with a view to establishing the foundations for further development of policy, practice and theory in this field.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review was conducted via searches on Scopus and Google Scholar between 2009 and 2019 for peer-reviewed articles containing keywords and phrases “Value-based healthcare industry” and “healthcare industry collaboration”. Refinement of the results led to the identification of “guiding conditions” (GCs) for collaboration in VBHC.

Findings

Five literature-derived GCs were identified as necessary for the successful implementation of initiatives such as VBHC through system-sector collaboration. These are: a multi-disciplinarity; use of appropriate technological infrastructure; capturing meaningful metrics; understanding the total cycle-of-care; and financial flexibility. This paper outlines research opportunities to empirically test the relevance of the five GCs with regard to improving system-sector collaboration on VBHC.

Originality/value

This paper has developed a practical and constructive framework that has the potential to inform both policy and further theoretical development on collaboration in VBHC.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 17 June 2019

Gareth Huw Davies, Sian Roderick, Michael D. Williams and Roderick Thomas

The Technium initiative started in 2001 with an initial Business and Innovation Centre established in the Swansea docklands area. Early success of this first Technium…

Abstract

The Technium initiative started in 2001 with an initial Business and Innovation Centre established in the Swansea docklands area. Early success of this first Technium building led to the concept being rapidly proliferated into a pan-Wales network of primarily sector-focussed centres. Although the Welsh Government withdrew its support for the Technium network initiative in 2010, the individual centres continued under a range of ownerships and the historic initiative of continued interest, particularly with respect to regional policy.

A vibrant policy and practice debate subsequently emerged together with strident media comment. Lack of coherence between Technium Centres and weaknesses in monitoring systems meant this debate has been poorly informed. This case study helps address the evidence deficit within this debate by revisiting the initial Technium Swansea initiative and its subsequent development.

The case study provides an insight into what can realistically be expected of such initiatives in the short, medium and long terms, with realistic time-horizons for ‘success’ and the role of learning for knowledge-based development in similar initiatives and regions.

Details

Creating Entrepreneurial Space: Talking Through Multi-Voices, Reflections on Emerging Debates
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-577-1

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2013

Janet Williams, Michael D. Williams and Arthur Morgan

The literature on enterprise resource planning (ERP) implementation has been dominated by variance theories which have identified numerous lists of critical success…

Abstract

Purpose

The literature on enterprise resource planning (ERP) implementation has been dominated by variance theories which have identified numerous lists of critical success factors (CSFs) for managing implementation but there has been relatively little research adopting a process theory approach which explains how change occurs. One such theory, the teleological process, has been criticised in the IS literature for its capability to evolve and learn due to its convergence towards an end goal. Drawing upon the field of organisational development (OD), the purpose of this paper is to illustrate the usefulness of the theory and contend that, whilst it exhibits planned behaviour, events are adaptive and learned and emerge though social construction of actors in organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

An in‐depth interpretive study of eight public‐sector organisations is used. During the investigation, two primary methods of data collection were analysed: survey questionnaires (2) and in‐depth interviews (38).

Findings

The data were analysed and contrasted with themes and attributes associated with teleological design. The article highlights how the central role of an agent or entity, and its interaction with eight key attributes, is critical to the success of the change process.

Originality/value

The article proposes benefits of applying teleological theory to the context of designing the change, pre and post project implementation. Whilst the data are based in the UK, the framework also provides a useful starting point for further research in ERP implementation in developing and emerging nations of areas likely to be problematic.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2007

Michael D. Williams and Janet Williams

Despite the availability of methods and techniques designed to assist with predictive and retrospective evaluation of ICT initiatives, management continues to struggle to…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the availability of methods and techniques designed to assist with predictive and retrospective evaluation of ICT initiatives, management continues to struggle to perform meaningful evaluations, and the measurement of ICT investment payoff remains a challenge. A recurring problem associated with failed ICT‐based investment is poor change management. This paper aims to focus on the value of understanding the change management aspects of ICT investments.

Design/methodology/approach

A framework was developed from a study of the change management literature. An empirical investigation involving a qualitative case study approach was then conducted in order to assess the efficacy of the framework during the evaluation process.

Findings

Business benefit from ICT is likely only when ICT investment is accompanied by appropriate change management skills. The study highlights the particular importance of communication, championing and change agency, resources, and the project timescale.

Research limitations/implications

Results were generated from a single case study. It is also acknowledged that it is unclear what impact (if any) a parallel project had on the project under investigation.

Practical implications

The paper highlights the value of effective change management, placing particular emphasis on effective communication during all stages of a project.

Originality/value

The paper explicitly employs change management techniques in order to identify potential problem areas. It recommends longitudinal research be conducted in order to employ the framework during both ex ante and ex post evaluation for a single initiative.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Ali Abdallah Alalwan, Yogesh K. Dwivedi, Nripendra P. P. Rana and Michael D. Williams

The purpose of this paper is to propose and examine a conceptual model that best explains the key factors influencing Jordanian customers ' intention to adopt…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose and examine a conceptual model that best explains the key factors influencing Jordanian customers ' intention to adopt mobile banking (MB).

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed conceptual model was based on the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). This was extended by adding perceived risk and self-efficacy as an external factors. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was conducted to analyse the data collected from the field survey questionnaires administered to a convenience sample of Jordanian banking customers.

Findings

The results showed that behavioural intention is significantly influenced by perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, and perceived risk.

Research limitations/implications

Practical and theoretical implications for both Jordanian banks and researchers in the MB context are also discussed in the concluding section.

Originality/value

MB-related issues are yet to be examined empirically in the Jordanian context. This submission has attempted to fill this gap by empirically examining some of the important factors influencing the adoption of MB from the Jordanian customers’ perspective.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2013

Ofir Ben‐Assuli and Moshe Leshno

Although very significant and applicable, there have been no formal justifications for the use of Monte‐Carlo models and Markov chains in evaluating hospital admission…

Abstract

Purpose

Although very significant and applicable, there have been no formal justifications for the use of Monte‐Carlo models and Markov chains in evaluating hospital admission decisions or concrete data supporting their use. For these reasons, this research was designed to provide a deeper understanding of these models. The purpose of this paper is to examine the usefulness of a computerized Monte‐Carlo simulation of admission decisions under the constraints of emergency departments.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors construct a simple decision tree using the expected utility method to represent the complex admission decision process terms of quality adjusted life years (QALY) then show the advantages of using a Monte‐Carlo simulation in evaluating admission decisions in a cohort simulation, using a decision tree and a Markov chain.

Findings

After showing that the Monte‐Carlo simulation outperforms an expected utility method without a simulation, the authors develop a decision tree with such a model. real cohort simulation data are used to demonstrate that the integration of a Monte‐Carlo simulation shows which patients should be admitted.

Research limitations/implications

This paper may encourage researchers to use Monte‐Carlo simulation in evaluating admission decision implications. The authors also propose applying the model when using a computer simulation that deals with various CVD symptoms in clinical cohorts.

Originality/value

Aside from demonstrating the value of a Monte‐Carlo simulation as a powerful analysis tool, the paper's findings may prompt researchers to conduct a decision analysis with a Monte‐Carlo simulation in the healthcare environment.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 26 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2013

Masoud Fakhimi and Jane Probert

The purpose of this paper is to identify the existing literature on the wide range of operations research (OR) studies applied to healthcare, and to classify studies based…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the existing literature on the wide range of operations research (OR) studies applied to healthcare, and to classify studies based on application type and on the OR technique employed. The scope of the review is limited to studies which have been undertaken in the UK, and to papers published since the year 2000.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 142 high‐quality journal and conference papers have been identified from ISI Web of Knowledge data base for review and analysis.

Findings

The findings categorise the OR techniques employed, and analyse the application type, publication trends, funding, and software packages used in the twenty‐first century in UK healthcare. Publication trends indicate an increasing use of OR techniques in UK healthcare. The findings show that, interestingly, the distribution of the OR techniques employed is not uniform; the majority of studies focus on simulation, either as the only technique employed or as one element of a multi‐method approach.

Originality/value

Several studies have focused on the use of simulation in healthcare modelling, but none has methodologically reviewed the use of the full range of OR techniques. This research is likely to benefit healthcare decision makers since it will provide them with an overview of the different studies that have utilised multiple OR techniques for investigating problems in the stated domain.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 26 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2013

Nripendra P. Rana, Yogesh K. Dwivedi and Michael D. Williams

The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine the performance of the alternative IS/IT adoption models used more frequently in the citizen centric adoption of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine the performance of the alternative IS/IT adoption models used more frequently in the citizen centric adoption of e‐government systems. Such analysis will not only provide a trend about the models and subsequent constructs being utilized in this area of research but also guides us toward laying a foundation for the formulation of an alternative integrated model for citizen centric adoption of e‐government services.

Design/methodology/approach

The relevant secondary data from 87 research studies on citizen centric e‐government services were analysed to examine the performance of some of the most frequently used alternative models (e.g. technology acceptance model (TAM), diffusion of innovation|innovation diffusion theory (DOI|IDT), DeLone and McLean IS success model, unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT), and theory of planned behaviour (TPB)) of IS/IT adoption in this area of research.

Findings

The findings of this research indicate that TAM is by far the best suited model for analysing citizen centric adoption of e‐government services. It was also found that although diffusion of innovation|innovation diffusion theory (DOI|IDT) is the second highly used model, only three of its constructs (i.e. compatibility, complexity, and relative advantage) were in use across various studies. Moreover, it was visualised that constructs such as triability and observability were never used in the e‐government context. Similarly, the constructs from TPB have not been used up to the presence of the model across various studies. All the constructs (i.e. performance expectancy, effort expectancy, and social influence) of the UTAUT model, except facilitating conditions, have been used quite regularly.

Research limitations/implications

This research evaluates the various IS/IT adoption research models being used in e‐government adoption only on the basis of their performances across the existing research studies. The evaluation of the performance of such models may not reflect their true picture only through meta‐analysis.

Originality/value

This paper presents a comprehensive meta‐analysis of some of the most frequently used IS/IT adoption models in the context of e‐government adoption research. Such analysis would help us picking up the most appropriate models and/or their constructs for developing an alternative model for our research.

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Michael D Williams, Nripendra P Rana and Yogesh K Dwivedi

– The purpose of this paper is to perform a systematic review of articles that have used the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to perform a systematic review of articles that have used the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT).

Design/methodology/approach

The results produced in this research are based on the literature analysis of 174 existing articles on the UTAUT model. This has been performed by collecting data including demographic details, methodological details, limitations, and significance of relationships between the constructs from the available articles based on the UTAUT.

Findings

The findings indicated that general purpose systems and specialized business systems were examined in the majority of the articles using the UTAUT. The analysis also indicated that cross-sectional approach, survey methods, and structural equation modelling analysis techniques were the most explored research methodologies whereas SPSS was found to be the largely used analysis tools. Moreover, the weight analysis of independent variables indicates that variables such as performance expectancy and behavioural intention qualified for the best predictor category. Moreover, the analysis also suggested that single subject or biased sample as the most explored limitation across all studies.

Research limitations/implications

The search activities were centered on occurrences of keywords to avoid tracing a large number of publications where these keywords might have been used as casual words in the main text. However, we acknowledge that there may be a number of studies, which lack keywords in the title, but still focus upon UTAUT in some form.

Originality/value

This is the first research of its type which has extensively examined the literature on the UTAUT and provided the researchers with the accumulative knowledge about the model.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

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