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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2009

F. William Brown and Michael D. Reilly

This paper aims to study the possible relationship between elements of personality as measured by the Myers‐Briggs type indicator (MBTI) and transformational leadership…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the possible relationship between elements of personality as measured by the Myers‐Briggs type indicator (MBTI) and transformational leadership (TL) as measured by the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ).

Design/methodology/approach

The study was done at the North American manufacturing facility of an international technology company. Utilizing the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire to measure transformational leadership, over 2,000 followers provided assessments of transformational leadership for 148 managers who had done self‐assessments and had completed Form K of the MBTI.

Findings

No relationship was found between follower assessments of transformational leadership and leader personality as measured by the MBTI. Leaders did, however, perceive themselves to be significantly more transformational than did those who reported to them. Leader preference for extraversion over introversion and intuition over perception were both significantly associated with self‐reports of transformational leadership.

Research limitations/implications

Studies utilizing large samples across a variety of organizational settings are needed to confirm the results of this study.

Practical implications

This study calls into question the existence of a relationship between the MBTI and transformational leadership. The study does not provide any support for the possible utility of the MBTI for the prediction or explanation of transformational leadership behaviors. Assuming that followers' perceptions of TL are the more valid, the findings suggest that previous results linking MBTI and TL may be measurement artifacts.

Originality/value

Utilizing a large sample, the MLQ and continuous measures of MBTI preferences the results of this study contradict previous reports of a relationship between personality as measured by the MBTI and transformational leadership.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 28 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2009

Myleen M. Leary, Michael D. Reilly and F. William Brown

For over three decades the Myers‐Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), a typology of personality preferences based on Jungian psychology, has been one of the most frequently used…

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13081

Abstract

Purpose

For over three decades the Myers‐Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), a typology of personality preferences based on Jungian psychology, has been one of the most frequently used assessments in personal and managerial development. Over the last decade attention to the possibility of non‐cognitive intelligence based on emotions has attracted considerable attention in both the academic and practitioner communities. This paper aims to report on an empirical study examining the possible relationships between the dispositional factors measured by the MBTI and elements of emotional intelligence (EI) as measured by the Bar‐On's emotional quotient inventory (EQI).

Design/methodology/approach

MBTI, Form G, and EQI data are collected in a population of over 500 managers and professional workers in an international manufacturing facility. Both categorical and continuous analysis of variance is utilized to test ten hypothesized relationships between personality preferences and EI constructs.

Findings

Results support the relationship between extroversion and the components of EI. Somewhat counter intuitively stress management, the measure of EI that captures an individual's internal focus, is related to extroversion. A positive and significant relationship between a preference for the use of feeling in decision making and an individual's EI is also found.

Originality/value

Despite the fact that the MBTI and the EQI are two of the most widely used instruments in organizational development very few studies have been done on their possible relationship. This is the first relatively large sample study of that relationship. Implications of the interaction of personality preferences and EI in organizational development are described.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

F. William Brown, Scott E. Bryant and Michael D. Reilly

This study aims to examine the possibility of relationships between and among emotional intelligence (EI), leadership, and desirable outcomes in organizations.

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8676

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the possibility of relationships between and among emotional intelligence (EI), leadership, and desirable outcomes in organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of 2,411 manufacturing workers, engineers, and professional staff, the study empirically examined the impact of EI, as measured by Bar‐On's Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQI), on organizational outcomes; the well documented ability of transformational leadership to predict those outcomes, and the relationship between EI and transformational leadership.

Findings

The results confirm previous studies of the extraordinary effectiveness power of transformational leadership in predicting organizational outcomes. However, in this study no support was found for hypothesized relationships between EI and desirable outcomes or a significant relationship between EI and transformational leadership.

Originality/value

EI may be a useful concept in understanding leadership and social influence; however, unlike previous studies no indication was found that EI as operationalized and measured by the EQI is of particular value in that exploration.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

Carol J. Kaufman

Considers the mixed results of studies linking between wives′employment and time‐saving behaviours. Argues that a possibleexplanation is found in limited conceptual…

Abstract

Considers the mixed results of studies linking between wives′ employment and time‐saving behaviours. Argues that a possible explanation is found in limited conceptual frameworks, inconsistent use of concepts, and insufficiently sensitive research measures. Concludes that both studies, and product development and promotion, should utilize a broadened conceptual framework of consumer time restraints, rather than just wives′ employment.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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Book part
Publication date: 12 January 2021

Milo Shaoqing Wang and Michael Lounsbury

Narrow, managerially centered notions of organizational culture remain hegemonic, marginalizing richer, anthropological approaches as well as efforts to understand how the…

Abstract

Narrow, managerially centered notions of organizational culture remain hegemonic, marginalizing richer, anthropological approaches as well as efforts to understand how the beliefs and practices of organizations are fundamentally shaped by the wider societal dynamics within which they are embedded. In this paper, the authors draw upon recent efforts to explore the interface of scholarship on practice and the institutional logics perspective to highlight the utility of a practice-driven institutional approach to the study of organizational culture that brings society back in. Empirically, the authors present a longitudinal case study of a Chinese private enterprise, and analyze how the unfolding dynamics of a strong community logic increasingly affected by a rising market logic, shaped the formation of political coalitions internally and externally as organizational members aimed to maintain truces between the push and pull of logics over a period of 22 years. Through an analysis of seven episodes that we conceptualize as “cultural encounters,” the authors find that a combination of compartmentalization and overall integration of logics contributes to provisional truces, and that people in the same cohort who share common geographic socialization are more likely to form allies. Our aim is to encourage future scholars to study how societal beliefs and practices work their way into organizations in a variety of explicit as well as more mundane, hidden ways.

Details

On Practice and Institution: New Empirical Directions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-416-5

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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2018

Norm O’Reilly, Tim Stroebel, Michael Pfahl and Jim Kahler

Sponsorship sales in professional sport is an area of increasing attention and growing investment, but the sport management literature offers only limited research about…

Abstract

Purpose

Sponsorship sales in professional sport is an area of increasing attention and growing investment, but the sport management literature offers only limited research about sales strategies and tactics. As a result, practitioners and academics alike have called for investigation in the area. In response to this need, the purpose of this paper is to empirically explore sponsorship sales in professional sport.

Design/methodology/approach

Sponsorship sales professionals working for sport properties in the four major North American sport leagues were surveyed on a variety of sponsorship sales-related variables and factors.

Findings

A total of 92 sponsorship sales professionals responded to the study, for an estimated 15.3 percent response rate. At the time of the data collection, the 92 respondents worked in the National Football League (NFL) (37), Major League Baseball (MLB) (16), National Basketball Association (NBA) (18), and National Hockey League (NHL) (21). A series of practical, conceptual, and comparative results are presented, highlighted by turnover as a problem, the importance of activation/servicing in sponsorship sales, and the high level of investment clubs are making in sponsorship sales.

Research limitations/implications

First, on “coverage,” the authors acknowledge that variations in the data can be linked, to a large extent, to reporting issues due to the nature of the study, the data, and the sample. Variations in sponsor number or training, for example, are not necessarily indicative of weaknesses in the industry, but occur because of strategic differences among properties. Second, it is important to note that not all properties had personnel respond to the study. Consequently, the figures presented in this study might be a function of the individual personnel who responded rather than a true average figure for a particular league. Third, in terms of the sample, this study deals with a very specific context in the four North American major sport leagues (NFL, MLB, NBA, and NHL). Thus, one should be careful in generalizing to minor professional, collegiate, Olympic, or other sport contexts.

Practical implications

The finding of this paper states that the turnover of sponsors may be a structural issue and is certainly related to the demand for the particular property (Seaver Marketing Group, 2010). Driven by a number of factors, including technology shifts to digital channels and increased sophistication by the sponsorship sales departments of professional sport properties, a shift in the activation and service paradigm is reported and extended to the specific context of sponsorship sales.

Social implications

Results show that sport properties in the North American major sport leagues have a strong commitment to sponsorship sales by the organization (commitment of resources), by sport personnel (who support the business side), and by their sponsorship sales professionals who report satisfaction, motivation, and support from their property.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first empirical research study specific on sponsorship sales in professional sport, thus providing direction for practice and future research on an issue of high importance to the sport industry.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2018

Ciara Mary Close, Tania Bosqui, Dermot O’Reilly, Michael Donnelly and Anne Kouvonen

There has been an increase in the use of registers and record linkages to study migrant mental health. However, the accuracy of these registers and the degree to which…

Abstract

Purpose

There has been an increase in the use of registers and record linkages to study migrant mental health. However, the accuracy of these registers and the degree to which they are representative of the migrant population in Northern Ireland (NI) are unclear. The purpose of this paper is to explore: the coverage of the NI migrant population in general practitioner (GP) data and Census records; the issues faced by migrants in terms of registering and accessing the local health system; and the reporting of racial hate crimes against migrants to police.

Design/methodology/approach

Two focus groups of professionals (n=17) who worked with migrants were conducted. Group discussions were guided by a research-informed topic guide, and the data were analysed using thematic analysis.

Findings

Three main themes emerged: issues with the use of GP registration, Census and hate crime data for researching migrant mental health; barriers to health service use (e.g. low cultural awareness among health staff and access to interpreters); and risk factor exposure and mental health status in migrant communities (e.g. poverty, isolation and poor working conditions).

Originality/value

Record linkage and registry studies of migrant health and well-being using Census and health service sources need to be mindful of the likelihood that some migrants may be missed. The possible underrepresentation of migrants in health registers may be explained by reduced use of such services which may be caused my encountering staff with limited cultural competency and the inability to access an interpreter promptly.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

Michael L. Tushman

This article is based on Professor Tushman's well‐received presentation at the 1997 international trategic leadership conference in Washington, D.C., in April

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7124

Abstract

This article is based on Professor Tushman's well‐received presentation at the 1997 international trategic leadership conference in Washington, D.C., in April

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1977

JEAN R. BRASSARD and ROBERT R. O'REILLY

Is there a relationship between the nature and intensity of the action orientations of the members of a team and group effectiveness? This problem was explored with a…

Abstract

Is there a relationship between the nature and intensity of the action orientations of the members of a team and group effectiveness? This problem was explored with a sample of 21 educational workshop groups taken from a population of 138 such groups associated with elementary schools in Quebec (Canada), categorized according to their rated effectiveness. Four other Measures, test V (values), N (Norms), R (roles) and F (facilities), were administered to parents, teachers and administrators who formed each educational workshop group. Effective groups differed from less effective groups in the areas of shared values, adherence to norms related to participation, methods of participating in the work and in the area of satisfaction with the human and material resources which affected their group behavior.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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