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1 – 10 of over 2000
Article
Publication date: 4 January 2021

Josephine Vaughan, Kim Maund, Thayaparan Gajendran, Justine Lloyd, Cathy Smith and Michael Cohen

This study aims to address the research gap about value in the holistic discourse of creative placemaking. It identifies and synthesises the often discounted social and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to address the research gap about value in the holistic discourse of creative placemaking. It identifies and synthesises the often discounted social and environmental values of creative placemaking along with typically emphasised economic values.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper builds upon two research phases; first, a review and extraction of creative placemaking value indicators from relevant current urban, cultural and planning literature; and second, the identification of relevant, practice-based, value indicators through interviews with 23 placemaking experts including practitioners, urban planners, developers and place managers from the two largest cities of NSW, Australia; Sydney and Newcastle.

Findings

This study identifies three broad thematics for valuing creative placemaking along with several sub-categories of qualitative and quantitative indicators. These indicators reveal the holistic value of creative placemaking for its key stakeholders, including expert placemakers, designers, building developers, government and community groups. A key conclusion of the research is the need for tools that grasp the interconnected, and at times conflicting, nature of placemaking’s social, economic and environmental outcomes.

Originality/value

While a variety of value indicators exist to understand the need for ongoing resourcing of creative placemaking, stakeholders identified the limitations of current approaches to determine, represent and appraise the value of creative placemaking. The indicators of value proposed in this research consolidate and extend current discourse about the value of creative placemaking specifically. The indicators themselves have profound practical implications for how creative placemaking is conceived, executed and evaluated. Theoretically, the study builds on the deep relationships between values and practice in creative placemaking, as well as critiquing narrow forms of evaluation that entrench economic benefits over other outcomes.

Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 1 May 2019

Anandasivakumar Ekambaram and Andreas Økland

This paper aims to address one of the fundamental issues of gathering existing knowledge/solutions from projects for re-use in other projects, that is, contextual elements…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to address one of the fundamental issues of gathering existing knowledge/solutions from projects for re-use in other projects, that is, contextual elements that are integrated with the knowledge. Contextual elements that are associated/integrated with knowledge do not often taken into consideration adequately during knowledge transfer. Hence, this can lead to undesirable consequences, for example, unnecessary use of time and resources. This paper will increase the awareness of (and lead to finding appropriate ways to) dealing adequately with contextual elements in knowledge transferring processes.

Design/Methodology/Approach

Qualitative method: narrative literature study.

Findings

This paper provides a conceptual understanding of dealing with contextual elements in knowledge transferring processes from the sense making perspective.

Research Limitations/Implications

This paper, which is connected to a research and development (R&D) project that has recently started, uses this paper to emphasize the importance of addressing contextual elements adequately in knowledge transferring processes. This emphasis is important as this R&D project deals with, among other things, collecting lessons learned on energy efficient solutions from building and renovation projects for re-use in other renovation projects.

Practical Implications

This paper will contribute to replicate knowledge / lessons learned effectively and to increase the application of energy efficient solutions in building renovation projects.

Originality/Value

This paper attempts to point out and increase our understanding on how acquisition of knowledge at an earlier point of time can influence transferring of that knowledge at a later point of time. In general, there is inadequate focus and awareness on this issue in construction projects.

Details

10th Nordic Conference on Construction Economics and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-051-1

Keywords

Expert briefing
Publication date: 24 April 2018

This follows Trump taking to social media on April 21 to say that the investigations into his lawyer, Michael Cohen, were a “Witch Hunt”, a phrase he also often uses to…

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB233306

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1982

Malcolm W. Pennington and Steve M. Cohen

Michael Porter, considered by corporate managers and business analysts to be one of strategic planning's leading theorists, is a professor of business policy at the…

2630

Abstract

Michael Porter, considered by corporate managers and business analysts to be one of strategic planning's leading theorists, is a professor of business policy at the Harvard Business School. Author of the recent bestseller Competitive Strategy and guest columnist for The Wall Street Journal, Professor Porter is noted for his heady stock of insightful planning theories. Here, in an interview conducted by Planning Review Senior Editor Malcolm W. Pennington and Managing Editor Steve M. Cohen, Professor Porter candidly discusses his entry into the field of strategic planning and the application of his theories to specific industries.

Details

Planning Review, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0094-064X

Book part
Publication date: 20 July 2000

Paul J. DiMaggio and Walter W. Powell

What makes organizations so similar? We contend that the engine of rationalization and bureaucratization has moved from the competitive marketplace to the state and the…

Abstract

What makes organizations so similar? We contend that the engine of rationalization and bureaucratization has moved from the competitive marketplace to the state and the professions. Once a set of organizations emerges as a field, a paradox arises: rational actors make their organizations increasingly similar as they try to change them. We describe three isomorphic processes-coercive, mimetic, and normative—leading to this outcome. We then specify hypotheses about the impact of resource centralization and dependency, goal ambiguity and technical uncertainty, and professionalization and structuration on isomorphic change. Finally, we suggest implications for theories of organizations and social change.

Details

Economics Meets Sociology in Strategic Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-051-7

Abstract

Details

Advances in Accounting Education Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-052-1

Book part
Publication date: 17 August 2016

M. Diane Burton, Lisa E. Cohen and Michael Lounsbury

In this paper, we call for renewed attention to the structure and structuring of work within and between organizations. We argue that a multi-level approach, with jobs as…

Abstract

In this paper, we call for renewed attention to the structure and structuring of work within and between organizations. We argue that a multi-level approach, with jobs as a core analytic construct, is a way to draw connections among economic sociology, organizational sociology, the sociology of work and occupations, labor studies and stratification and address the important problems of both increasing inequality and declining economic productivity.

Details

The Structuring of Work in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-436-5

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 28 January 2022

Abstract

Details

Transcendent Development: The Ethics of Universal Dignity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-260-7

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Michael Cohen, Sara Guciardo and Joel Schneider

Describes how educational media company Sesame Workshop has applied research to the development and evaluation of children’s TV programming; Sesame Workshop was the…

Abstract

Describes how educational media company Sesame Workshop has applied research to the development and evaluation of children’s TV programming; Sesame Workshop was the creator in 1969 of the “Sesame Street” TV series, which intentionally blended entertainment and education, and it has now teamed up with Applied Research and Consulting LLC (ARC). Explains the historical background to television research, and the development by Sesame Workshop and ARC of New Kid City, a prototype media environment for children, and later of Noggin, an interactive “place to go” with a website and children’s TV channel. Illustrates the application of the Sesame Workshop approach in one of its programmes, “Rechov Sumsum/Shara’a Simsim”, which is aimed at Israeli and Arab/Palestinian children.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2000

Michael Cohen and Edward Cahill

Successful marketing to children not only requires an understanding of how kids are different from each other, but also how those differences are changing. This paper…

Abstract

Successful marketing to children not only requires an understanding of how kids are different from each other, but also how those differences are changing. This paper examines the developmental differences in children and the phenomenon of developmental compression — the recent contraction of age‐specific psychological stages — as well as their implications for conducting market research with children. It offers evidence of developmental compression and discusses such contributing factors as the media, new parenting styles, complex family life, and the changing nature of children's activities, brand awareness, and purchase power. The paper argues that the core challenge of this phenomenon is that, while children may be manifesting more grown‐up behaviour in certain domains, their cognitive, physical and emotional compression may not be happening in sync with one another. Thus, while children may appear to be sophisticated consumers, they are not always able to understand the marketing messages directed at them or the implications of their purchase decisions.

Details

International Journal of Advertising and Marketing to Children, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6676

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 2000