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Article

Margarietha Johanna de Villiers Scheepers, Renee Barnes, Michael Clements and Alix Jayne Stubbs

The purpose of this paper is to propose an experiential entrepreneurship work-integrated learning (EE WIL) model recognising that the development of an entrepreneurial…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose an experiential entrepreneurship work-integrated learning (EE WIL) model recognising that the development of an entrepreneurial mindset enables graduates to manage their careers in uncertain labour markets. The model shows how students develop relationships with their professional community, and not only a few employers.

Design/methodology/approach

The pedagogical underpinning of the conceptual model, attributes associated with the entrepreneurial mindset and relationships between the student, professional community and university are explained, and illustrated through a case study at the University of the Sunshine Coast.

Findings

The EE WIL model enables students to develop agency through structured engagement with a professional community, facilitating the development of bridging social capital. Bonding social capital can be developed through intense, sustained interaction between students and their professional community.

Practical implications

WIL curricula should be scaffolded and directed towards developing sustained interaction and information sharing, underpinned by professional community norms. This approach enables students to develop an aligned professional identity and emotional attachment to the professional community. The experiential development of an entrepreneurial mindset enables students to solve career challenges, by viewing these as opportunities. Professional communities and universities both share the responsibilities of preparing the future graduate workforce.

Originality/value

The conceptual model draws on effectual entrepreneurship pedagogy and contributes to the WIL literature, showing that an entrepreneurial mindset can be cultivated experientially through an intensive, emotional and authentic learning experience.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 60 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Nonlinear Time Series Analysis of Business Cycles
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44451-838-5

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Book part

Michael P. Clements and David F. Hendry

In recent work, we have developed a theory of economic forecasting for empirical econometric models when there are structural breaks. This research shows that…

Abstract

In recent work, we have developed a theory of economic forecasting for empirical econometric models when there are structural breaks. This research shows that well-specified models may forecast poorly, whereas it is possible to design forecasting devices more immune to the effects of breaks. In this chapter, we summarise key aspects of that theory, describe the models and data, then provide an empirical illustration of some of these developments when the goal is to generate sequences of inflation forecasts over a long historical period, starting with the model of annual inflation in the UK over 1875–1991 in Hendry (2001a).

Details

Forecasting in the Presence of Structural Breaks and Model Uncertainty
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-540-6

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Article

Michael A Clements

Since the 1960s there have been over twenty attempts at changing the ambiguous and confusing 1950 Shops Act; the most spectacular failure was the most recent attempt, the…

Abstract

Since the 1960s there have been over twenty attempts at changing the ambiguous and confusing 1950 Shops Act; the most spectacular failure was the most recent attempt, the Shops Bill in April 1986. This piece of legislation foundered although it carried the support of the Prime Minister, her Cabinet, and a sizeable number in the House of Commons. In all cases attempts to change the legislation has been successfully blocked by a coalition of churchmen, trades unions, some retailers and other committed sections of the general public. The latest attempt, in the form of a (Tory) Private Member's Bill, is currently under way. Its thrust is a much more watered‐down set of proposals than those suggested in the Auld Report (and subsequent 1986 Shops Bill), calling for only DIY stores and garden centres to be allowed to open on a Sunday. Dr Clements takes a look at the implications these proposals might have on enforcement of the law, and reports the findings of two consumer studies that suggest that the proposals are not going far enough for many consumers. Empirical data referred to in the paper is drawn from two studies, each of over 1,000 households randomly selected in North Staffordshire, in November 1983 and again in November 1985.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

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Article

Michael Bichard and Graham Towl

Michael Bichard has worked in the public sector throughout his career ‐ 20 years in local Government and nearly ten in central Government. He was Chief Executive of Brent…

Abstract

Michael Bichard has worked in the public sector throughout his career ‐ 20 years in local Government and nearly ten in central Government. He was Chief Executive of Brent and Gloucestershire local authorities and in 1990 became Chief Executive of the Government's Benefits Agency. In 1995 he was appointed Permanent Secretary of the Employment Department and then the Department for Education and Employment. Michael received a Knighthood in the Queen's Birthday Honours 1999. In May 2001 he left the Civil Service and in September 2001 was appointed Rector of The London Institute, the largest Art and Design Institute in Europe, which in May 2004 became University of the Arts London. In January 2004 he was appointed by the Home Office to chair the Soham/Bichard Inquiry and on 1 April 2005 he became Chair of the Legal Services Commission.

Details

International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

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Article

Bonnie Cord, Chris Sykes and Michael Clements

Higher education is seeking ways to close the perceived gap between employer's expectations of graduates and the current preparation these graduates receive. Experiential…

Abstract

Purpose

Higher education is seeking ways to close the perceived gap between employer's expectations of graduates and the current preparation these graduates receive. Experiential learning programs offer students one such opportunity to develop professionally and acquire generic workplace skills. This transition however, from the classroom to the workplace, can be a challenging process for students, and is the focus of this paper.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discusses the importance of programs and their supervisors integrating “caring” into work placements. Several stages of the transition process are discussed before seven principles of a successful student transition are outlined.

Findings

This paper demonstrates how a beyond duty of care approach can be adopted in experiential learning programs through seven key principles.

Practical implications

It is anticipated that prioritizing a transition that enlarges the notion of student “care” and adoption of the seven key principles will narrow the perceived gap between employers and higher education's expectations of graduates.

Originality/value

While experiential learning programs involve three stakeholders, the literature has not yet recognised the importance of each of these roles in the students' progressional development in the workplace. This paper outlines these roles and identifies seven ways the approach can be incorportaed into the pratices of an expereintial learning program.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

New Directions in Macromodelling
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-830-8

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Article

Michael D. Clements

The purpose of this paper is to provide a viewpoint on the importance of building learning capability through enhancing the learning talent chain.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a viewpoint on the importance of building learning capability through enhancing the learning talent chain.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper identifies approaches to building learning capacity in an organization through contributing to the learning talent chain. It offers a perspective on how organizations and education providers could collaborate to provide opportunities for students to apply their knowledge through work experience, benefiting both the student and organization.

Findings

The initial feedback from organizations support the framework as a mechanism to connect industry, the student body and the education provider.

Practical implications

Understanding how industry and education providers can better collaborate will enhance organizations ability to develop talent in tough economic times. This viewpoint challenges learning talent chain members to contribute jointly to providing an environment to thrive on change

Originality/value

The value of this paper is to provide the reader an approach to building learning capacity through work related learning opportunities with students.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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Article

Matthew P. Pepper and Michael D. Clements

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the concept of a staged cumulative learning mechanism as part of a role‐play model for the teaching of supply chain concepts.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the concept of a staged cumulative learning mechanism as part of a role‐play model for the teaching of supply chain concepts.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents the preliminary testing of an alternative model for the facilitation of supply chain learning within organizations. Following on from this, initial feedback is discussed before future stages of development are considered.

Findings

Through the structured implementation of complex supply chain interactions, practitioners can provide effective training that leads to deeper understanding of the interactions and communication skills necessary to balance an organizations successful operation in a modern supply chain.

Originality/value

The value of this paper is to invite the reader to consider the use of extended role‐playing as a mechanism to facilitate the development of cumulative learning outcomes which provide employees with a toolbox of understanding to better approach interaction activities within and between supply chain partners.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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Article

Bonnie Cord and Michael D. Clements

This purpose of this paper is to present EOI as an mechanism for higher education to better prepare students for the ever changing workforce, a collaborative effort from…

Abstract

Purpose

This purpose of this paper is to present EOI as an mechanism for higher education to better prepare students for the ever changing workforce, a collaborative effort from higher education and organizations is needed to support the transition of students from the classroom into industry.

Design/methodology/approach

This viewpoint provides a mechanism to enhance the student outcomes from work related learning (WRL) programs, supported by student reflection. This paper presents one such WRL program that provides a vehicle for EOI to enhance student learning outcomes.

Findings

The positive learning outcomes through student reflection on their experience in the program endorses EOI as a mechanism for students' early professional development.

Practical implications

Involving organizations earlier in higher education transition programs enables both students and perspective employers to maximize opportunities for learning and development. Engaging organizations through EOI will ensure WRL programs better prepare students and manage their expectations for the workplace, leading to greater retention and outcomes of graduates entering the workplace, benefiting the student, higher education and employer.

Originality/value

This paper provides an approach to support students transitioning from higher education into the workforce by engaging with organizations early on in the students' professional education.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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