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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

Michael K. Buckland, Mark H. Butler, Barbara A. Norgard and Christian Plaunt

There has been a massive investment in the installation of online catalogs: in selection, in the supporting infrastructure of terminals and networks, in catalog record…

Abstract

There has been a massive investment in the installation of online catalogs: in selection, in the supporting infrastructure of terminals and networks, in catalog record conversion, in training, and, lately, in linking online catalogs with other online systems. In contrast, the state‐of‐the‐art of the functionality of online library catalogs has advanced little in the past few years. Rather it has been a matter of existing systems being upgraded towards the functionality of the better systems and of refinements being added. It is time for a further advance in online catalog design. We believe that the next generation of online catalogs should and will have features such as those discussed and illustrated in this article.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Article
Publication date: 29 January 2020

Michael James Buckland and Anthea Tinker

The purpose of this paper is to explore and compare the motivations and expectations that older people have when choosing to move into either a private or housing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore and compare the motivations and expectations that older people have when choosing to move into either a private or housing association (HA) extra care housing (ECH) scheme, and any effects this had on its residents.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study is based on findings from four HA schemes in Tower Hamlets, London, and one private scheme in Warwickshire. Eight semi-structured interviews were conducted with five women and three men of varying backgrounds, from schemes managed by different associations and companies. Interview transcripts were coded and analysed thematically.

Findings

All residents moved into ECH in response to deteriorating health. However, almost all residents had felt obliged to move by others, generally their children. Few residents had any expectations of ECH on arrival, but many developed high expectations of an increased sense of independence and security and of an improved social life. ECH appeared to be beneficial for residents’ health and well-being.

Research limitations/implications

The inability to recruit an equal number of people from HA and private scheme, alongside the small sample size, may compromise the external validity of any conclusions drawn from any comparisons.

Practical implications

This research identifies a lack of knowledge about ECH among the general population and offers insight into areas of poor management within ECH schemes which could be improved.

Social implications

Inadequacies in the ECH model could be attributed to failures in the current health and social care system. Differences between expectations and perceptions of HA vs private schemes should be acknowledged and responded to.

Originality/value

This is a rare example of research exploring the relationships between ECH residents’ motivations and expectations (Hillcoat-Nallétamby and Sardani, 2019), and between those in HA vs private schemes.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Michael Keeble Buckland

The purpose of this paper is to examine the agenda for library technology for the next 20 years.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the agenda for library technology for the next 20 years.

Design/methodology/approach

A long-term historically based analysis of the evolving roles of librarians and library technology, especially the catalog.

Findings

The rise of standardized cataloging codes, communications formats, bibliographical utilities, and software for online searching constitutes a great triumph in universal bibliographical access for everybody. But each reader is unique and no-one is “everybody” so a uniform service is not ideal for all. The ideal librarian knows both the collection and the readers. The catalog is a guide to the collection and a surrogate for the librarian. The librarian understands the readers. The development of library technology will remain significantly incomplete until the uniqueness of each reader is accommodated. Some ways to do that are noted.

Research limitations/implications

Research and development should focus on relating the uniqueness of individuals to the uniformity of services provided.

Practical implications

Strategic directions are indicated.

Originality/value

Provides a perspective on the development of library service in terms of changing relationships between technology and librarians.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 March 2009

Bernd Frohmann

The purpose of this paper is to provide a reconsideration of Michael Buckland's important question, “What is a document?”, analysing the point and purpose of definitions…

3252

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a reconsideration of Michael Buckland's important question, “What is a document?”, analysing the point and purpose of definitions of “document” and “documentation”.

Design/methodology/approach

Two philosophical notions of the point of definitions are contrasted: John Stuart Mill's concept of a “real” definition, purporting to specify the nature of the definiendum; and a concept of definition based upon a foundationalist philosophy of language. Both conceptions assume that a general, philosophical justification for using words as we do is always in order. This assumption is criticized by deploying Hilary Putnam's arguments against the orthodox Wittgensteinian interpretation of criteria governing the use of language. The example of the cabinets of curiosities of the sixteenth‐century English and European virtuosi is developed to show how one might productively think about what documents might be, but without a definition of a document.

Findings

Other than for specific, instrumentalist purposes (often appropriate for specific case studies), there is no general philosophical reason for asking, what is a document? There are good reasons for pursuing studies of documentation without the impediments of definitions of “document” or “documentation”.

Originality/value

The paper makes an original contribution to the new interest in documentation studies by providing conceptual resources for multiplying, rather than restricting, the areas of application of the concepts of documents and documentation.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 65 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Anthea Tinker, Victoria Berdugo, Michael Buckland, Lois Crabtree, Anistta Maheswaran, Andrea Ong, Jasmine Patel, Emilia Pusey and Chandini Sureshkumar

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence that volunteering before medical school with older people in a care home has on the perceptions of older people.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence that volunteering before medical school with older people in a care home has on the perceptions of older people.

Design/methodology/approach

Eight medical students answered an anonymous questionnaire relating to their experiences of volunteering in a care home before medical school. This was combined with an analysis of the relevant literature.

Findings

All the students had initially volunteered to enhance their CV for medical school. After volunteering, they had a greater realisation of the variety of older people. They also gained a number of transferable skills related to communicating with older people, especially those with cognitive impairment. The greatest learning experience was around the issues to do with dementia.

Research limitations/implications

The research is based on eight students although they were from different areas.

Practical implications

It would be beneficial if care homes could be more proactive in encouraging prospective medical students to volunteer. Medical schools could also provide clearer advice or take a more active stance such as encouraging prospective students to volunteer with older people. Further research should be with a larger sample to gain insight into varying perspectives. It would also be useful to conduct research into older adults’ attitudes towards the contribution of potential medical students to their own lives and to the home.

Social implications

Volunteering before medical school should be encouraged as it will enhance the chances of getting a place as well as being an eye opening experience and equip them with lifelong skills.

Originality/value

Original.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1984

Mickey Moskowitz

Collection development literature has burgeoned over the past decade, yet the complaint is still heard that college libraries are not engaged in meaningful collection…

Abstract

Collection development literature has burgeoned over the past decade, yet the complaint is still heard that college libraries are not engaged in meaningful collection development activities. College librarians often consider methods described in published research as too time‐consuming, technologically dependent, or statistically complex to apply to their own situations. How relevant is the literature to the practical needs of the collection developer? In addressing this question, a theoretical overview of collection development is presented, and recent publications reviewed, in terms of their relevance to collection planning, implementation, and evaluation in the small college library.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

W. David Penniman

Penniman describes a mission and vision for the library of the twenty‐first century that go far beyond document delivery. He proposes that the real mission of the library…

Abstract

Penniman describes a mission and vision for the library of the twenty‐first century that go far beyond document delivery. He proposes that the real mission of the library is to help present and future generations of citizens become independent problem solvers—who have available, and know how to use, information tools to address the challenges that face them. To help fulfill this mission, he proposes that libraries seek a vision that can be realized with the help of technology: to create a universal window to the vast array of information held by our libraries and to offer this window to the widest possible audience.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Book part
Publication date: 24 September 2001

Robert M. Hayes

Abstract

Details

Models for Library Management, Decision Making and Planning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-792-9

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

Clifford A. Lynch

This article reviews the present and expected future environments for network‐based electronic publishing and network access to bibliographic and journal databases…

Abstract

This article reviews the present and expected future environments for network‐based electronic publishing and network access to bibliographic and journal databases. Emerging visions of “electronic libraries” are considered. The difficulties inherent in the development of full text and images as networked information are outlined. The growth and diversification of library collections in electronic form and the requisite network access systems are discussed, as are the prospect of increased resource sharing among libraries and the subsequent explosion of document delivery requests (and costs!). The issues of storage and format of electronic publishing are developed, and perspectives on electronic publishing are presented for all those involved: the author, the library, the reader, and the publisher. A change in the scope, and thereby in the definition, of the library is anticipated.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Article
Publication date: 13 January 2012

Kiersten F. Latham

The purpose of this article is to understand the meaning of museum objects from an information perspective. Links are made from Buckland's conceptual information framework…

5295

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to understand the meaning of museum objects from an information perspective. Links are made from Buckland's conceptual information framework as a semiotic to museum object as “document” and finally to user experience of these museum “documents”. The aim is to provide a new lens through which museum studies researchers can understand museum objects and for LIS researchers to accept museum objects as another form of document to be studied.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual and comparative analysis of Buckland's information typology as a semiotic. Outcome of analysis forms a model of understanding the museum object as a “document” that is accessed by users on a continuum of experience.

Findings

Michael Buckland's information typology is insightful and useful for a broad understanding of what all heritage institutions have in common: the physical object. Buckland helps us see the museum as an information system, the museum object as a document, and the multidimensional use of the concept information and its semiotic ramifications.

Originality/value

Buckland's typology is important to an understanding of the museum system and museum object in both LIS and museum studies. The concept of “document” opens up a broader perspective, which creates, rather than limits understandings of the human relationship with information. This expanded concept of “document” as sign/semiotic helps us understand user experience in ways not previously explored in the convergence of museums and information studies, from the practical to the theoretical. In this inclusive sense, Buckland's concept of document is a unifying theoretical concept for museums, libraries, and archives.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 68 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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