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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1993

Michael Bromley

When the dispute between Rupert Murdoch's News International (NI), publisher of the Times, Sunday Times, News of the World and Sun newspapers, and the major print unions…

Abstract

When the dispute between Rupert Murdoch's News International (NI), publisher of the Times, Sunday Times, News of the World and Sun newspapers, and the major print unions erupted into what was almost universally known as ‘the battle’ of Wapping during the opening weeks of 1986, there was widespread concern not only at what appeared to be more evidence of the parlous state of British industrial relations, but that central to the confrontation were apparently wholesale abuses of power which allegedly subverted the concept of the ‘liberty of the Press’. The immediate reactions triggered by events at Wapping, and the ideological references used to try to contextualise those events, were for the most part superficial. Long‐run concerns about the trend of industrial relations, or more meaningful reflections on wider questions of ‘the freedom of the media’, rarely, if ever, entered the agenda. While since 1986–7 these issues have been addressed, they have usually been considered either in isolation from one another or crudely juxtaposed in terms of the effects on the economics of publishing. Moreover, industrial relations in the newspaper industry have not commonly attracted the attention of specialists in the field, and have traditionally been considered too peculiar to have much broader relevance. Yet events at Wapping have been seen as heralding a ‘revolution’ in Fleet Street, invested with far more substantial and broader material and symbolic meaning; for example, Andrew Neil, editor of the Sunday Times, recently projected Wapping as marking a decisive break with the discredited past of ‘this failed nation’.

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Management Research News, vol. 16 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Abstract

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Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-239-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Nicola Cowen

Traditional media, such as newspapers, are having to reassess their role in the Internet age. Not only are newspapers having to compete with each other, but also with…

Abstract

Traditional media, such as newspapers, are having to reassess their role in the Internet age. Not only are newspapers having to compete with each other, but also with foreign newspapers from all over the globe and their information providers choosing to deliver news on their websites. The aim of this paper is to determine the present state and the future of the British newspaper on the World Wide Web. An evaluation of the five British broadsheet websites was carried out between 11th August and 11th September 2000. Three broad categories were selected to evaluate the websites information content, interactivity and business and marketing features. Interviews were also carried out in order to gauge the opinion of journalists, information specialists and New Media professionals as to the future path for newspapers. The results showed that newspapers, to a certain extent, are still repurposing their hard copy content for the Web. However, online newspapers are making some advances by maximising their content and by developing discussion forums and feedback mechanisms. FT.com has made the greatest effort to reassess its purpose on the Internet. The interview results showed that there is no clear strategy for the future of newspapers on the WWW. However, what became clear was the opinion that newspapers should concentrate on targeting a local audience, facilitating community publishing and investing in research. All stress that whatever move they make, newspapers must make one and fast.

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Aslib Proceedings, vol. 53 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2015

Nicholas Michael Perez and Max Bromley

The purpose of this paper is to compare the nature of campus police and city police in the areas of human resource and select community policing practices and policies…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the nature of campus police and city police in the areas of human resource and select community policing practices and policies. This comparison serves as an update to the work of Bromley and Reaves (1998a, b) and Bromley (2003).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper utilizes the Bureau of Justice Statistics Campus Police Reports from 2012 and the Law Enforcement Management and Administrative Statistics Reports from 2007 and 2013 to provide a comparison between campus and city departments in matters of human resource and community outreach policies and practices, paying special attention to demographics, salary, education, training, pre-employment screening, collective bargaining, community-policing, and special programs utilized.

Findings

The data suggest that, while differences do exist between campus and city practices, there are a substantial number of similarities between the two. In some areas, such as workforce diversity, campus police are somewhat ahead of their city counterparts. These findings indicate that campus departments are a primary piece of the larger law enforcement community.

Originality/value

Overall, the comparisons continue to reinforce the notion that campus departments are part of the larger law enforcement community. This information may provide insights for both campus and city police executives, as well as to top-level executives at institutions of higher education.

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Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Nicholas Michael Perez, Max Bromley and John Cochran

The purpose of this paper is to suggest that the environment in which law enforcement officers operate is a main source of their job satisfaction, which is related to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to suggest that the environment in which law enforcement officers operate is a main source of their job satisfaction, which is related to their overall work performance. In this line of research, a recent study by Johnson (2015) examined the organizational, job, and officer characteristics that may predict a police officer’s organizational commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

The current study replicates and extends the analyses performed in that study using an alternative data source to understand the influence of these measures on sheriff deputies’ organizational commitment during their organization’s shift to community-oriented policing.

Findings

Our results, while similar to those of Johnson (2015), revealed some unique findings. For example, in the current analyses, several organizational- and job- factors were significantly associated with deputies’ commitment to the sheriffs’ office. Specifically, deputies who report receiving higher supervisor feedback, higher peer cohesion, higher job variety and autonomy, and lower job-related stress were more highly committed to their law enforcement agency.

Practical implications

Key implications emerge for police administrators aspiring to influence employee organizational commitment during major agency shifts.

Originality/value

Overall, the present paper largely supports and progresses the findings of Johnson (2015) by extending them to sheriffs’ deputies, who are still largely underrepresented in policing research, and to an agency undergoing a dramatic organizational change. As such, the present study represents an important next step in understanding the factors that influence organizational commitment in law enforcement organizations.

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Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1995

C. Musès

The greatest mistakes and delusions of human history have come about through logically drawing conclusions from an omissive set of premisses. Cybernetics, being the…

Abstract

The greatest mistakes and delusions of human history have come about through logically drawing conclusions from an omissive set of premisses. Cybernetics, being the science of the study and redirection of feedback, is the science of consequences; its essential task is to recognize and deal with all feedback effects, including the consequences of such omissive conceptions – the so‐called blind spot. Gives some examples of the blind spot as it has manifested itself throughout history in the world of science. Concludes that cybernetics can defuse this blind spot which has perennially plagued human development, individually and societally.

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Kybernetes, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1966

“OH, that socialist fellow” would have been the rejoinder of older members of the Bromley establishment up to 1950 to any mention of H. G. Wells. It was not held to be an…

Abstract

“OH, that socialist fellow” would have been the rejoinder of older members of the Bromley establishment up to 1950 to any mention of H. G. Wells. It was not held to be an honour for the town to have been the birthplace of H. G. Wells nor was it felt that he should be honoured by the town. No plaque marked the site of his birthplace and there was no greater stock of his books in the Bromley Library than in any other.

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New Library World, vol. 68 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Ray Bromley

Provide a general contemporary overview of street vending around the world, focusing on the major issues underlying its permanence as a phenomenon, and the ambivalent…

Abstract

Provide a general contemporary overview of street vending around the world, focusing on the major issues underlying its permanence as a phenomenon, and the ambivalent attitudes displayed towards it by governments and off‐street business communities. Focuses on street vendors as an occupational group ad includes arguments for and against their existence, the impact of their geographical and economic location, and role of the government.

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International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 20 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

C. Musès

The greatest mistakes and delusions of human history have come about through logically drawing conclusion from an omissive set of premises. Cybernetics, being the science…

Abstract

The greatest mistakes and delusions of human history have come about through logically drawing conclusion from an omissive set of premises. Cybernetics, being the science of the study and redirection of feedback, is the science of consequences; its essential task is to recognize and deal with all feedback effects, including the consequences of such omissive conceptions – the so‐called blind spot. Gives some examples of the blind spot as it has manifested itself throughout history in the world of science. Concludes that cybernetics can defuse this blind spot which has perennially plagued human development, individually and societally.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 31 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Afzal Sheikh, Sunil Vadera, Michael Ravey, Gary Lovatt and Grace Kelly

Over 200,000 young people in the UK embark on a smoking career annually, thus continued effort is required to understand the types of interventions that are most effective…

Abstract

Purpose

Over 200,000 young people in the UK embark on a smoking career annually, thus continued effort is required to understand the types of interventions that are most effective in changing perceptions about smoking amongst teenagers. Several authors have proposed the use of social norms programmes, where correcting misconceptions of what is considered normal behaviour lead to improved behaviours. There are a limited number of studies showing the effectiveness of such programmes for changing teenagers’ perception of smoking habits, and hence this paper reports on the results from one of the largest social norms programmes that used a variety of interventions aimed at improving teenagers’ perceptions of smoking. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

A range of interventions were adopted for 57 programmes in year nine students, ranging from passive interventions such as posters and banners to active interventions such as student apps and enterprise days. Each programme consisted of a baseline survey followed by interventions and a repeat survey to calculate the change in perception. A clustering algorithm was also used to reveal the impact of combinations of interventions.

Findings

The study reveals three main findings: the use of social norms is an effective means of changing perceptions, the level of interventions and change in perceptions are positively correlated, and that the most effective combinations of interventions include the use of interactive feedback assemblies, enterprise days, parent and student apps and newsletters to parents.

Originality/value

The paper presents results from one of the largest social norm programmes aimed at improving young people’s perceptions and the first to use clustering methods to reveal the impact of combinations of intervention.

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