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Library Hi Tech News, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

Michael Bowman

In this time of rapidly increasing journal subscription costs and shrinking (or stable) acquisition budgets, it is imperative to acquire materials as effectively as…

Abstract

In this time of rapidly increasing journal subscription costs and shrinking (or stable) acquisition budgets, it is imperative to acquire materials as effectively as possible. One method of doing this is to use citation analysis of the scholarly literature as a guideline. Citation analysis is the analysis of the references from a set of documents (such as an analysis of all of the citations from five years of College & Research Libraries or of all citations from geology dissertations at a university). Information received from the analysis includes: languages of items cited, age of items cited (to calculate a half‐life for the field), and rate of self‐citations. Broadus reviewed citation analysis, its use, validity, and reliability. In the past, citation analysis has been used in collection development to decide on the suitability of specific items (both journals and monographs), such as mentioned in Buzzard and Whaley. The method introduced here is to use the percentage of publication formats cited in the research literature to serve as a guideline for acquisitions budget breakdowns, i.e., percentages allocated to monographs versus that allocated to other formats, for each discipline. The reasoning behind this is that an effective method of acquiring materials is to purchase the materials that the library's clients will use in the formats in which they will use them. The key assumption is that the citations in a scholar's paper reflect the literature the scholar used.

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Collection Building, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1986

MELINDA RILEY, BRIAN LANTZ, MIKE CORNFORD, TONY WARSHAW, JANE LITTLE, EDWIN FLEMING, ALLAN BUNCH and WILFRED ASHWORTH

The idea for this hugely successful event at the Crucible Theatre on 7 June, came first from the pages of New Library World, believe it or not. Reading one of Jane…

Abstract

The idea for this hugely successful event at the Crucible Theatre on 7 June, came first from the pages of New Library World, believe it or not. Reading one of Jane Little's articles advertising Feminist Book Fortnight, I noticed that there was not going to be a feminist book fair in this country this year, and that the main fair was to be in Oslo. It seemed an ideal opportunity to alter Sheffield's image as the macho snooker playing capital of the North and the idea for the First Sheffield Women's Book Fair was born.

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New Library World, vol. 87 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1964

SOCIAL scientists have not yet been able to formulate any general laws about behaviour in industry that are capable of broad application. In recent years, however, they…

Abstract

SOCIAL scientists have not yet been able to formulate any general laws about behaviour in industry that are capable of broad application. In recent years, however, they have made many useful case studies of which the one just published by the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research is typical. It is an approach to the problem which can do much to increase the understanding of the way in which people react to common industrial situations.

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Work Study, vol. 13 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1995

Jackie Mardikian and Martin Kesselman

The changing reference environment and reference staffing have been the topic of several articles in the library literature, discussions at the American Library…

Abstract

The changing reference environment and reference staffing have been the topic of several articles in the library literature, discussions at the American Library Association conferences and a recent conference offered twice by Library Solutions Inc. of Berkeley, California, entitled Rethinking Reference. Libraries are looking closely at the model at Brandeis University of eliminating the reference desk and replacing it with an information desk with research consultations with librarians taking place in an office. Larry Oberg urges librarians to stop thinking of the reference desk as a key reason for being a librarian. He contends that paraprofessionals can and do perform well at a reference desk, freeing librarians to concentrate on higher‐level tasks. These discussions and examples demonstrate a variety of solutions academic libraries have taken regarding the changing face of reference, and the evolving roles of reference librarians in moving towards the electronic library. The electronic library brings us new options and new opportunities and as a result librarians need to develop new ways of thinking and organizing reference services.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

Warigia Bowman and Arifa Khandwalla

This essay surveys and synthesizes the academic literature, archival sources and interviews with key policy makers regarding the emergence of community technology centers…

Abstract

This essay surveys and synthesizes the academic literature, archival sources and interviews with key policy makers regarding the emergence of community technology centers in the US. Community Technology Centers (CTCs) came to the fore in the late 1990s through an activist nonprofit sector combined with federal government and private sector funding. Federal data indicates that CTCs now represent the most important access points to information communications technology for the poor in the US. This essay reviews the latest arguments for and against continued investment in CTCs and public access in general. In addition to providing access, which is often used beneficially for employment and education related purposes, CTCs appear to contribute to social capital as they become social gathering points. This paper concludes, that both government and nonprofits play a vital role in ensuring public access for the poor and that continued investment in CTCs is warranted.

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Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2018

Viktoria Gallova, Marek Palasinski, Neil Shortland, Michael Humann and Lorraine Bowman Grieve

The purpose of this paper is to determine the potential predictors of anxiety about digital security, terrorist threats and support for high-tech counter measures.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the potential predictors of anxiety about digital security, terrorist threats and support for high-tech counter measures.

Design/methodology/approach

In Study 1, 195 participants indicated their anxiety about digital security systems, data protection and social networking sites. In Study 2, 107 participants indicated their anxiety about domestic terrorism, international terrorism and extremist groups. In Study 3, 261 participants indicated their support for high-tech counter-terrorism measures.

Findings

Study 1 suggests that whereas anxiety about digital security systems, data protection and social networking sites was positively predicted by right-wing authoritarianism, anxiety about social networking was also negatively predicted by time spent online. Study 2 shows that time spent online was a negative predictor of anxiety about domestic terrorism. Study 3 indicates that the strongest positive predictor of support for all the measures was right-wing authoritarianism, followed by national identity.

Research limitations/implications

The findings show the relevance of terror management theory to digital security and counter-terrorism.

Practical implications

It appears that right-wing authoritarianism and national identity may serve as mechanisms for people to subjectively counter the presented threats. This notion may inform relevant policy and practice aimed at making communities safer and potentially helps introduce counter-terror measures with less public backlash.

Social implications

When designing counter-terror measures, policy makers should consider compound national identities (e.g. Catalan or Basque people).

Originality/value

The paper makes contribution to under-explored areas of terrorism anxiety and support for counter-terror measures.

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Safer Communities, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

New teams can take a long time to get going. With critical and complex projects, this can cost vital time and resources. Some projects sink without trace as a result. So…

Abstract

New teams can take a long time to get going. With critical and complex projects, this can cost vital time and resources. Some projects sink without trace as a result. So how can one get a group of people to perform as a unit immediately? Westland Helicopters faced this challenge when the company created a team to deliver the Bowman sub‐contract for General Dynamics UK. The team of ten will control the four main areas of the Westland’s Bowman program – training, integrated logistics, aircraft‐installation activity and land‐site conversions. The team will have to direct cross‐functional groups of up to 50 people.

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Training Strategies for Tomorrow, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1369-7234

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Book part
Publication date: 10 February 2015

Andrew Bowman, Julie Froud, Sukhdev Johal, Michael Moran and Karel Williams

This exploratory paper discusses the undemocratic agenda setting of elites in Britain and how it has changed politics within a form of capitalism where much is left…

Abstract

This exploratory paper discusses the undemocratic agenda setting of elites in Britain and how it has changed politics within a form of capitalism where much is left undisclosed in terms of mechanism and methods. It argues for a more radical exploratory strategy using C. Wright Mills’ understanding that what is left undisclosed is crucially important to elite existence and power, while recognising the limits on democratic accountability when debate, decision and action in complex capitalist societies can be frustrated or hijacked by small groups. Have British business elites, through their relation with political elites, used their power to constrain democratic citizenship? Our hypothesis is that the power of business elites is most likely conjuncturally specific and geographically bounded with distinct national differences. In the United Kingdom, the outcomes are often contingent and unstable as business elites try to manage democracy; moreover, the composition and organisation of business elites have changed through successive conjunctures.

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Elites on Trial
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-680-5

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Article
Publication date: 19 November 2005

Gabriele Suder and Michael R. Czinkota

Based on a literature review of terrorism and global business literature, this paper addresses those conditions that may lead to new considerations about risk and its…

Abstract

Based on a literature review of terrorism and global business literature, this paper addresses those conditions that may lead to new considerations about risk and its management at policy and the MNE (multinational enterprise) level. How do MNEs adapt to the 09/11 ‐ type risk in strategic management that shapes choices made for internationalization and for international business operations? It is observed that MNEs increasingly enlarge the notion of political risk. We suggest the development of a strategic risk assessment that incorporates terrorism which in its threat, event and aftermath does not remain local or national, but influences investment, location, logistics, supply‐chain and other performance‐ linked decisions of the international value chain through an enlarged risk‐return evaluation. Using the OLI‐paradigm as a typology, we extend Dunning’s work by incorporating the terrorism dimension. We do so mainly through the analysis and distinction of the most vulnerable links in firms’ value chain in which adjustments need to be made in the face of terrorism threat, act and aftermath. This paper attempts to improve the understanding of international management in an era of global risk and uncertainty.

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Multinational Business Review, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

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