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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2016

Anna Corbo Crehan and Michael Absalom

The purpose of this paper is to enhance the understanding of the situational vulnerabilities faced by police qua police, with a view to identifying the best ways of addressing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to enhance the understanding of the situational vulnerabilities faced by police qua police, with a view to identifying the best ways of addressing those vulnerabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

The “theoretical vocabulary for analysing vulnerability” developed by Mackenzie et al. (2014) provides the framework for most of the discussion. Discussions of self-care as developed for other professions have informed the discussion on self-care for police officers.

Findings

The paper draws two key conclusions: that a fuller understanding of police officers’ vulnerability qua police needs to extend to a consideration of officers’ off-duty time, and that police officers need to be better apprised of the situational vulnerabilities they will face qua police officers so that subjective experiences of those vulnerabilities are not unnecessarily traumatic. Finally the paper identifies the need for the professional obligation to engage in efficacious self-care practices to be applied to police officers to ensure responsibility for their situational vulnerabilities is fairly distributed between themselves and their organisation.

Practical implications

The insights identified in the paper have implications for better addressing the ways in which police officers cope, and are assisted to cope, with the distressing and disturbing aspects of their work.

Originality/value

A clear need for better understanding of, and responses to, the vulnerabilities to which police work gives rise is required, given current rates of suicide, and mental and psychological injury amongst police officers.

Details

Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3841

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1972

Harry C. Bauer

LET'S VARY LITERACEE with a little bibliographic burglaree. If you suddenly feel like humming The Pirates of Penzance or recollecting Gilbert and Sullivan, you are closely attuned…

Abstract

LET'S VARY LITERACEE with a little bibliographic burglaree. If you suddenly feel like humming The Pirates of Penzance or recollecting Gilbert and Sullivan, you are closely attuned to the bibliographic thoughts in my mind. Literary allusions are the rich overtones that make reading and writing a grand collaboration and a happy pursuit. An author may conscientiously write to convey ideas, but if a cut above the average, he always strives as did H. L. Mencken to express his ideas ‘in suave and ingratiating terms, and to discharge them with a flourish, and maybe with a phrase of pretty song’. His creative efforts will be mostly wasted, however, if his readers lack the requisite literary background and sophistication that would enable them to join in his game and share his earnest effusions. Literacy is never enough; a young child can read and understand the six one‐syllable words ‘who steals my purse, steals trash’, but that same child can grow to be a mighty old man without ever fully comprehending the sentence unless he reads Othello and studies Iago's presumptuous remarks on ‘Good name in man and woman’.

Details

Library Review, vol. 23 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1939

Stanley Snaith

No one concerned for the dignity of letters can have failed to notice the increasing voracity and audibility of publishers' advertising of recent years. With this in mind I have…

Abstract

No one concerned for the dignity of letters can have failed to notice the increasing voracity and audibility of publishers' advertising of recent years. With this in mind I have been studying the literary section of an issue of the Observer. The results are disquieting. The “Books of the Day” feature runs from page 4 to page 9. On page 4 the text proper occupies three centre columns (not quite full columns, for Michael Joseph butts in with an advertisement across the foot). It is flanked on the left by Hodder and Stoughton, a two‐column spread from top to bottom; on the right is another two‐column spread of which Victor Gollancz has the lion's share. Hodder's display is a series of drab shaded panels, Gollancz's is a characteristically resonant proclamation in heavy type: the two in opposition strike discords in the midst of which the actual matter of the book reviews twitters faintly like a virginal trying to be heard in a mass‐meeting of trombones and bugles. Page 5 is split clean in half, three columns being devoted to text and the remainder—a massive four‐column spread—being again dedicated to Mr. Gollancz's commercial purposes. Page 6 repeats the tale—three columns of text to four of advertisements. On pages 7 and 8 the proportion of advertisement to text is equally heavy. On page 9 (the last of the literary section) the comparatively “decent pomp” of Harrap and Cassell is to the forefront—but by some oversight a dividend of two half‐columns of text above the average quota has been allowed to creep in. In all, the six book pages of one of our leading Sunday journals are carved up, roughly, as: text, nineteen columns; advertisements, twenty‐three columns.

Details

Library Review, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1963

THE serious and intractable housing problem persists to plague governments and embitter citizens. Why this is so can be gleaned from a few statistics.

Abstract

THE serious and intractable housing problem persists to plague governments and embitter citizens. Why this is so can be gleaned from a few statistics.

Details

Work Study, vol. 12 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

Abstract

Researcher Highlight: Dr. Carter G. Woodson (1875–1950)

Details

Black American Males in Higher Education: Diminishing Proportions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-899-1

Article
Publication date: 22 February 2008

David Bamford and Michael Griffin

This paper aims to report on research into human resource management within an operations management environment; specifically, operational team‐work amongst health care workers…

5357

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report on research into human resource management within an operations management environment; specifically, operational team‐work amongst health care workers in a hospital.

Design/methodology/approach

Eight operational teams within a UK National Health Service hospital took part and the research used a combination of survey and group discussions.

Findings

The results show the construct of the team had little operational definition. Key factors identified as contributing to effective team‐working include: leadership; frequency of team meetings; a climate of trust and openness. There was limited evidence of truly multi‐disciplinary teams and of organisational support for team‐working.

Research limitations/implications

The methodology applied was appropriate, generating data to facilitate discussion and draw specific conclusions therefrom. A perceived limitation is the single case approach; however, Remenyi et al. argue this can be enough to add to the body of knowledge. In terms of implications this paper demonstrates that team‐working is no panacea; as part of a bundle of good operations management practices it is associated with efficiency, effectiveness, and in this case improved patient care.

Practical implications

The paper suggests a new input, process, output model of effective team‐working and identifies issues to be faced in adopting a strategy of developing an operational team‐based organisation.

Originality/value

The value of this paper is the conclusion that the importance of operational team‐working is as a paradigm for assessing how effectively individuals and groups work together, rather than as a specific organisational form with an optimal size.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Sarojni Choy, Minglin Li and Parlo Singh

The purpose of this paper is to present a case for appraisal of the current curriculum provisions for international students. In this paper, the authors summarise the key…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a case for appraisal of the current curriculum provisions for international students. In this paper, the authors summarise the key challenges of Asian international research graduate students pursuing doctorate studies in Australian universities to become researchers for the global communities. The intention is to advocate further research on current higher degree research curriculum with a view to enriching the developmental experiences of international research graduate students in preparation for global practice.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an analytical paper that adopts a conceptual and rhetorical approach.

Findings

The authors review a growing body of research on higher degree research studies and establish a need for appraisal of current curriculum provisions.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to concentrate on an emerging need to appraise current higher degree research curriculum provisions to enhance the development international research graduate students for global practices.

Details

International Journal for Researcher Development, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2048-8696

Keywords

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