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Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-726-1

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Article
Publication date: 31 October 2018

Verena Sabine Thaler, Uta Herbst and Michael A. Merz

While product scandals generate many negative headlines, the extent of their impact on the scandalized brands’ equity remains unclear. Research findings are mixed. This…

Abstract

Purpose

While product scandals generate many negative headlines, the extent of their impact on the scandalized brands’ equity remains unclear. Research findings are mixed. This might be because of the limitations of existing measurement approaches when investigating the effects of real crises after they occurred. This study aims to propose a new approach for measuring the impact of a real scandal on a high-equity brand using only post-crisis measures.

Design/methodology/approach

To overcome the challenge of comparing a priori and ex post outcome measures, this study draws on the brand management literature to evaluate a real scandal’s impact. Volkswagen’s emission scandal serves as a failure context. Two consumer experiments are conducted to examine its impact.

Findings

The results provide (longitudinal) support for the proposed evaluative approach. They reveal new evidence that building brand equity is a means to mitigate negative effects, and indicate that negative spillover effects within a high-equity brand portfolio are unlikely. Finally, this research identifies situations in which developing a new brand might be more beneficial than leveraging an existing brand.

Practical implications

This research has significant implications for firms with high-equity brands that might be affected by a scandal. The findings support managers to navigate their brands through a crisis.

Originality/value

This research adds to the discussion concerning the role of a brand’s equity in a crisis. Existing research findings are contradictory. This research provides new empirical evidence and another view on how to measure “impact”.

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Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 25 April 2008

Michael A. Merz, Yi He and Dana L. Alden

Given the ongoing globalization debate and lack of agreement about whether consumer cultures are predominantly globalizing, glocalizing, or localizing, the purpose of this…

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Abstract

Purpose

Given the ongoing globalization debate and lack of agreement about whether consumer cultures are predominantly globalizing, glocalizing, or localizing, the purpose of this paper is to propose a conceptual framework designed to help clarify discussion and facilitate theoretical progress.

Design/methodology/approach

By integrating Rosch's categorization theory into the discussion of whether consumer cultures globalize, glocalize, or localize, several propositions can be formulated that help structure this discussion systematically.

Findings

It is demonstrated that arguments for global consumer culture (GCC) are most easily made at the superordinate level. However, their strength (versus glocal and local consumer culture) at the basic and subordinate levels is moderated by whether meanings associated with the consumption factor are primarily functional or symbolic.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should empirically validate this initial effort. In addition, scholars should examine from a non‐western centric perspective whether GCC is emerging across the different category levels and meaning systems. Furthermore, emic research is needed to examine the emic meanings of the categories herein.

Practical implications

This proposed framework is also designed for marketing managers as a new tool to facilitate their global strategic planning.

Originality/value

This paper moves the GCC culture debate forward by integrating, for the first time, categorization theory into the discussion. This is of value for both academics and practitioners.

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International Marketing Review, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Book part
Publication date: 1 August 2017

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Qualitative Consumer Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-491-0

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Book part
Publication date: 2 September 2014

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Shopper Marketing and the Role of In-Store Marketing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-001-8

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Book part
Publication date: 3 July 2018

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Innovation and Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-828-2

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Book part
Publication date: 13 June 2013

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Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-761-0

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Book part
Publication date: 27 June 2016

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Marketing in and for a Sustainable Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-282-8

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Book part
Publication date: 2 May 2015

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Brand Meaning Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-932-5

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Book part
Publication date: 25 June 2012

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Special Issue – Toward a Better Understanding of the Role of Value in Markets and Marketing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-913-4

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