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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Michael Jones, Andrea Melis, Silvia Gaia and Simone Aresu

The purpose of this paper is to examine the voluntary disclosure of risk-related issues, with a focus on credit risk, in graphical reporting for listed banks in the major…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the voluntary disclosure of risk-related issues, with a focus on credit risk, in graphical reporting for listed banks in the major European economies. It aims to understand if banks portray credit risk-related information in graphs accurately and whether these graphs provide incremental, rather than replicative, information. It also investigates whether credit risk-related graphs provide a fair representation of risk performance or a more favourable impression than is warranted.

Design/methodology/approach

A graphical accuracy index was constructed. Incremental information was measured. A multi-level linear model investigated whether credit risk affects the quantity and quality of graphical credit risk disclosure.

Findings

Banks used credit risk graphs to provide incremental information. They were also selective, with riskier banks less likely to use risk graphs. Banks were accurate in their graphical reporting, particularly those with high levels of credit risk. These findings can be explained within an impression management perspective taking human cognitive biases into account. Preparers of risk graphs seem to prefer selective omission over obfuscation via inaccuracy. This probably reflects the fact that individuals, and by implication annual report’s users, generally judge the provision of inaccurate information more harshly than the omission of unfavourable information.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides theoretical insights by pointing out the limitations of a purely economics-based agency theory approach to impression management.

Practical implications

The study suggests annual reports’ readers need to be careful about subtle forms of impression management, such as those exploiting their cognitive bias. Regulatory and professional bodies should develop guidelines to ensure neutral and comparable graphical disclosure.

Originality/value

This study provides a substantive alternative to the predominant economic perspective on impression management in corporate reporting, by incorporating a psychological perspective taking human cognitive biases into account.

Details

Journal of Applied Accounting Research, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-5426

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

David C. Wyld, Michael A. Jones and Jeffrey W. Totten

Examines the adoption of radio frequency identification (RFID) technology in the commercial aviation industry, focusing on its role in baggage handling and security.

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9184

Abstract

Purpose

Examines the adoption of radio frequency identification (RFID) technology in the commercial aviation industry, focusing on its role in baggage handling and security.

Design/methodology/approach

Draws upon academic and trade literature to provide a current overview of developments in the implementation of RFID technology in commercial aviation, particularly focusing on Delta Airlines, an industry leader in the USA in the testing and development of RFID systems for improved operations in baggage handling.

Findings

Though RFID technology is experiencing widespread adoption across many industries, commercial aviation seems poised to be a leader in its full‐scale adoption in practice. RFID technology demonstrates distinct advantages over the currently used barcode system for baggage handling.

Practical implications

This paper shows how RFID technology can improve customer service though better operational efficiency in baggage handling, which has been demonstrated to be an integral component of an airline's customer service equation. Academicians and marketing professionals should both be aware of developments with RFID technology. It is of particular importance in the airline sector, as improved accuracy of baggage handling can enable air carriers to close an important service‐delivery gap in an increasingly turbulent operating environment.

Originality/value

Little is published in the academic literature about this timely topic. Most of the published information available is from corporate or commercial sources, and is presented in such formats as white papers. This paper is a companion piece to the review of RFID in UK retailing by Jones et al. in this issue.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

S.J. Giles, Gary A. Cook, Michael A. Jones, Brian Todd, Margaret Mason, B.N. Muddu and Kieran Walshe

The first phase of this study developed a multi‐professionally agreed list of adverse events for clinical incident reporting in Trauma and Orthopaedics. This follow‐up…

Abstract

Purpose

The first phase of this study developed a multi‐professionally agreed list of adverse events for clinical incident reporting in Trauma and Orthopaedics. This follow‐up study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of the adverse event list.

Design/methodology/approach

Two follow‐up questionnaires were sent to healthcare professionals working in Trauma and Orthopaedics in two of the participating National Health Service (NHS) Trusts (n=247 for the first questionnaire and n=240 for the second questionnaire). Trends in routine incident reporting data were also monitored over a two‐year period to determine the impact of the adverse event list on levels of adverse event reporting.

Findings

The questionnaires indicated that awareness about the adverse event list was good and improved between questionnaires. However usage of the adverse event list appeared to be poor. Multiple regression analysis with the dependent variable count of orthopaedic incidents suggested that the adverse event list had little, if any impact on levels of reporting in Trauma and Orthopaedics.

Originality/value

The results of this study suggest that a practical tool, such as the adverse event list has little impact on incident reporting levels.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Seungoog Weun, Sharon E. Beatty and Michael A. Jones

Previous research has found that interactional justice and distributive justice are critical factors influencing customer satisfaction after a service recovery. In…

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14158

Abstract

Previous research has found that interactional justice and distributive justice are critical factors influencing customer satisfaction after a service recovery. In addition, previous service recovery research has found that satisfaction is an important determinant of key outcome variables such as trust, commitment, and negative word‐of‐mouth. The current study extends previous research by investigating the role of service failure severity within the existing framework of service recovery research. The results indicate that service failure severity has a significant influence on satisfaction, trust, commitment, and negative word‐of‐mouth. The results also provide partial support for a moderating influence of service failure severity. Implications and areas for future research are discussed.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Michael A. Jones and Jaebeom Suh

The distinction between transaction‐specific satisfaction and overall satisfaction has received little empirical attention in the satisfaction and services literature…

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8556

Abstract

The distinction between transaction‐specific satisfaction and overall satisfaction has received little empirical attention in the satisfaction and services literature. Furthermore, a review of the extant literature provides mixed conceptual evidence concerning the relationships among transaction‐specific satisfaction, overall satisfaction, and repurchase intentions. This study empirically investigates transaction‐specific satisfaction, overall satisfaction and repurchase intentions, and finds that the two types of satisfaction can be distinguished from one another. Furthermore, the findings from this study suggest that overall satisfaction has a direct influence on repurchase intentions as well as a moderating influence on the transaction‐specific satisfaction/repurchase intentions relationship. When overall satisfaction is high, transaction‐specific satisfaction has little impact on repurchase intentions, but when overall satisfaction is low, transaction‐specific satisfaction has a positive influence on repurchase intentions.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2017

Stuart Hannabuss

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162

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Michael A Jones, Kristy E Reynolds, Mark J Arnold, Colin B Gabler, Stephanie T Gillison and Vincent Myles Landers

The purpose of this study is to explore consumers’ overall attitude toward relationship marketing and to determine the influence of consumers’ overall attitude on…

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10696

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore consumers’ overall attitude toward relationship marketing and to determine the influence of consumers’ overall attitude on consumers’ intentions and behaviors. Many services companies practice relationship marketing and customer relationship management. Although the benefits and drawbacks of relationship marketing for consumers have been established, little is known about whether consumers have a relatively positive or negative attitude toward relationship marketing practices.

Design/methodology/approach

This research investigates consumers’ attitudes toward relationship marketing using a national survey of 245 consumers and a survey of 417 consumers living in the southern region of the USA.

Findings

Although approximately 70 per cent of our national consumer sample had a somewhat positive attitude toward relationship marketing, about 30 per cent had a somewhat negative or neutral attitude. Furthermore, approximately 39 per cent of consumers in the study would choose a company that does not engage in relationship marketing over a company that does. The results also indicate that consumers’ overall attitude toward relationship marketing impacts their likelihood to respond favorably to specific relationship marketing tactics.

Research limitations/implications

Some limitations should be noted. First and not uncommon to most survey research in marketing, the relationships between constructs in this study may be inflated because of common methods bias. Second, this research reports the results from two studies. Although one of the studies represents a national sample, additional research using the scales developed in this research is needed.

Practical implications

This research indicates that consumers’ attitudes toward relationship marketing impacts their willingness to engage in relationships with service companies and their response to specific relationship marketing tactics. Because consumer attitudes toward relationship marketing vary, companies should consider segmenting their customer base using this information.

Originality/value

This study extends previous research by using quantitative techniques to measure consumers’ overall attitudes toward relationship marketing and assessing the influence of those attitudes on intentions and behaviors.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Michael A. Jones, David L. Mothersbaugh and Sharon E. Beatty

Location has long been touted as an important competitive factor in retailing and services. However, since convenient, high‐traffic locations are costly, an examination of…

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7311

Abstract

Location has long been touted as an important competitive factor in retailing and services. However, since convenient, high‐traffic locations are costly, an examination of conditions under which locational convenience is more important and those in which it is less important is critical. Supplements the logic of prior research to examine the importance of location as a function of both customer satisfaction with the core service and service type. Finds that a convenient location is critical in more standardized, less personalized services when satisfaction falters, but is not important for less standardized, more personalized services regardless of satisfaction levels. Thus, a convenient location can act as a barrier to defection in more standardized, less personal services such as banks, making it an important strategic factor in minimizing defection when satisfaction with the core service drops. However, contrary to conventional wisdom, locational convenience appears less important to repurchase intentions for less standardized, more personal services such as hairstylists, thus negating its potential as a switching barrier for such services.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 17 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Book part
Publication date: 31 October 2017

Brian McKenna

This chapter will examine ideological debates currently taking place in academics. Anthropologists – and all academic workers – are at a crossroads. They must determine…

Abstract

This chapter will examine ideological debates currently taking place in academics. Anthropologists – and all academic workers – are at a crossroads. They must determine what it means to “green the academy” in an era of permanent war, “green capitalism,” and the neoliberal university (Sullivan, 2010). As Victor Wallis makes clear, “no serious observer now denies the severity of the environmental crisis, but it is still not widely recognized as a capitalist crisis, that is, as a crisis arising from and perpetuated by the rule of capital, and hence incapable of resolution within the capitalist framework.”

Details

Environmental Criminology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-377-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

Specialist surface treatment subcontractor, Impact Finishers Limited, has been awarded BS 5750 Part II, and is believed to be the first company of its kind to receive this…

Abstract

Specialist surface treatment subcontractor, Impact Finishers Limited, has been awarded BS 5750 Part II, and is believed to be the first company of its kind to receive this coveted British Standard qualification.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 64 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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