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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Sarah Loor and Michael A. Crumpton

This purpose of this paper is to discuss a collaboration with a non-profit organization conducted as part of the Real Learning Connections project at the University of…

311

Abstract

Purpose

This purpose of this paper is to discuss a collaboration with a non-profit organization conducted as part of the Real Learning Connections project at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. The authors discuss their experiences working with a non-profit partner from outside the university and the benefits gained from collaboration.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a reflection based on the personal experiences of the authors as collaborators in the project.

Findings

Through their experience with the Real Learning Connections project, the authors found that collaborating with a non-profit organization provides a unique opportunity for library school students to learn practical skills while also providing value to the non-profit organization in the form of expertise in information services.

Originality/value

This piece discusses the benefits of collaboration from the perspective of both an Library and Information Studies (LIS) student and a professional librarian, as well as considering the experiences of an external non-profit organization.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 29 April 2019

Michael A. Crumpton and Nora J. Bird

Library and Information Studies (LIS) education is changing to meet the needs of a dynamic, information-seeking public by infusing new skills development into the…

Abstract

Library and Information Studies (LIS) education is changing to meet the needs of a dynamic, information-seeking public by infusing new skills development into the education process. This includes new ways to teach from a theoretical point of view in the classroom, new partnerships and expectations, and learning from practitioners through practicums, internships, and volunteering. Embracing innovation and entrepreneurship within the education framework for library and information science education will ensure a profession that can change and be sustainable into the future.

Examples and active programs from field literature are provided to make the case for the need to include entrepreneurial skill development into the LIS curriculum and program development.

This chapter will discuss the value of applying or including an entrepreneurial education component into LIS programs. Changes to practicum experiences can also help students engage more broadly and redefine how to provide library resources and services in an uncertain future. The value to the student will also be examined. Whether as part of a standard program or as part of a professional development initiative, students or individuals obtaining competencies and skills related to risk-taking, building diverse relationships, and becoming comfortable with ambiguity will increase their chances for a broader range of employment.

The work in this chapter has been developed and shared in pieces at various presentations and venues but never collected and documented as a single work, but for this chapter.

Details

Supporting Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-206-1

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Michael A. Crumpton

This paper aims to explore the concept of providing education and guidance to library staff for the purpose of supporting philanthropic activities made on behalf of the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the concept of providing education and guidance to library staff for the purpose of supporting philanthropic activities made on behalf of the library. The need for this type of activity and basic principles of philanthropy are included.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper includes a through literature review and a case study narrative with examples on activities at the author’s home institution.

Findings

The literature supports that cultivating a broader, more detailed understanding of philanthropic activities within the organization, will improve fundraising results and individual satisfaction for giving and receiving.

Practical implications

The concepts discussed have beginnings in other institutions and recognize a trend of adapting business models to libraries’ needs.

Originality/value

The is the author’s own work, shared with members of the author’s organization.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Michael A. Crumpton

241

Abstract

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Michael A. Crumpton

This paper aims to advocate the consideration of Maslow’s Grumble Theory to advance motivational activities within the organization, as well as matching individual needs…

521

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to advocate the consideration of Maslow’s Grumble Theory to advance motivational activities within the organization, as well as matching individual needs to morale concerns. This includes a view of associated costs as an investment instead of a common expense.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper includes a study of Maslow’s Needs Hierarchy and related literature that supports a modern interpretation. Suggestions are made for administrators to view solving complaints or grumbles proactively by investing in appropriate activities.

Findings

Overall, if complaints are viewed as opportunities to address individual needs, with the top level of grumbles empowered to help support high-level organizational functions, the organization can benefit greatly.

Originality/value

This paper represents the author’s point of view after a study of Grumble Theory and self-application of suggestions.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 24 November 2015

Michael A. Crumpton

The purpose of this chapter is to highlight the importance of including emotional intelligence training with programs related to providing mentorship to others. Formal…

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to highlight the importance of including emotional intelligence training with programs related to providing mentorship to others. Formal mentoring programs, established with specific goals and objectives, need foundation work for context in order to be successful. This chapter pulls from professional literature, important basic components of both emotional intelligence skills and attributes for successful mentoring. By demonstrating the relationship between emotional intelligence and mentors who are successful, future programs and activities within the workplace regarding formal mentorship structures can be influenced positively. There is a relationship between having good emotional intelligence skills by people who mentor and being successful within the mentoring relationship. Mentors who are more self-aware of their own emotions are more likely to manage a mentoring relationship more positively and with better outcomes. Library and information science professionals are undergoing tremendous change within the professional environment, the establishment of mentoring networks can greatly influence professional turnover. The opinions and concepts presented from professional literature has been used and adapted by the author in various workshops and presentations. It is this practitioner’s opinion that any formal mentoring program should start with providing a foundation of emotional intelligence skills for the mentors.

Details

Library Staffing for the Future
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-499-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Michael A. Crumpton

This paper aims to deal with recognizing and reacting to an aging workforce and understanding the value that older workers can still represent to an organization.

747

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to deal with recognizing and reacting to an aging workforce and understanding the value that older workers can still represent to an organization.

Design/methodology/approach

This article references field literature to support the points addressed.

Findings

Librarians and library workers have knowledge and experience that can provide value to both their organizations as they approach retirement and afterwards as retirees in a variety of ways.

Originality/value

This article represents the viewpoint of the author produced from his experiences and understandings.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Michael A. Crumpton and Philip B. White

This case study aims to outline the activities related to a project to create a foundation for the libraries’ social media activities and determine return on investment…

1170

Abstract

Purpose

This case study aims to outline the activities related to a project to create a foundation for the libraries’ social media activities and determine return on investment and value added for the efforts.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study describes the actions taken and the information tracked in establishing social media presence with recommendation for a sustainable program.

Findings

Social media adds value to libraries’ organizational personality, but it also incurs cost and effort that should be strategically managed.

Originality/value

This case study was conducted in the authors’ home institution.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Rebecca A. Croxton, Michael A. Crumpton and Gerald V. Holmes

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the impact the University of North Carolina at Greensboro’s (UNCG) Library and Information Studies Academic and Cultural Enrichment…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the impact the University of North Carolina at Greensboro’s (UNCG) Library and Information Studies Academic and Cultural Enrichment (ACE) Scholars Program has had on promoting diversity and adding value to the library and information studies profession.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is presented as a case study in which three iterations of the ACE Scholars Program are discussed, including program design and suggested impact the program has had on educating and engaging diverse individuals for careers in the library and information studies professions.

Findings

Nearly 50 ACE Scholars program participants, representing ethnically, racially and socioeconomically diverse backgrounds, have graduated from UNCG with their Master of Library and Information Studies degrees since 2011. In the five years since the first ACE cohort graduated, Scholar alums continue to impact the Library and Information Studies (LIS) profession through their professional roles as well as through their community engagement, professional association memberships and leadership roles, professional presentations and numerous publications.

Originality/value

This paper presents a model that has helped to promote diversity in the LIS field in way that can be adapted by other graduate programs that are preparing individuals for successful and engaged careers as library and information studies professionals.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 29 April 2019

Kathryn Crowe, Michael A. Crumpton, David Gwynn, James Harper, Mary Beth Lock and Mary G. Scanlon

To identify change in the understanding of entrepreneurship in libraries through content analysis of presentations that were a part of the Conference for Entrepreneurial…

Abstract

To identify change in the understanding of entrepreneurship in libraries through content analysis of presentations that were a part of the Conference for Entrepreneurial Librarians from 2009 through 2016. This chapter will discuss key topics and findings related to libraries and entrepreneurship.

Presentations delivered at the conference were categorized into topics and were tracked to uncover perceptions of what is entrepreneurial in libraries and how the importance of certain issues has changed over time. This chapter summarizes the results of that evaluation and of a survey of attendees after the conferences ended.

Entrepreneurship in libraries in 2009 was more heavily linked to making money. Over time, however, the term “entrepreneurial” became more conceptually associated with finding value, reaching out to new constituencies, and taking risks. There is a definite distinction as to the definition of “entrepreneurial” between public libraries (who consider community outreach to be a part of their core mission) and academic libraries (who often see this as an entrepreneurial enterprise). The finding that librarians attended the conference to “find change agents” indicates a yearning to identify with others in the field who are likewise seeking ways to be entrepreneurial.

The evaluation of the status of “entrepreneurship in libraries” has never before been undertaken by evaluating the presentations of the practitioners in a conference setting. Since the practitioners are determining what is most valuable to discuss with others in the field, this provides some insight into the status of entrepreneurship in the field.

Details

Supporting Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-206-1

Keywords

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