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1 – 10 of over 4000
Article
Publication date: 26 February 2021

Hartmut Hoehle, Jia Wei, Sebastian Schuetz and Viswanath Venkatesh

In the aftermath of data breaches, many firms offer compensation to affected customers to recover from damaged customer sentiments. To understand the effectiveness of such…

Abstract

Purpose

In the aftermath of data breaches, many firms offer compensation to affected customers to recover from damaged customer sentiments. To understand the effectiveness of such compensation offerings, Goode et al. (2017) examined the effects of compensation offered by Sony following the PlayStation Network breach in 2011. Although Goode et al. (2017) present key insights on data breach compensation, it is unclear whether their findings generalize beyond the context of subscription-based gaming platforms whose customers are young and experience substantial switching costs. To address this issue, we conducted a methodological replication in a retail context with low switching costs.

Design/methodology/approach

In our replication, we examine the effects of compensation offered by Home Depot in the aftermath of its data breach in 2014. Home Depot is the largest home improvement retailer in the US and presents a substantially different context. Data were collected from 901 participants using surveys.

Findings

Our results were consistent with the original study. We found that in retail breaches, effective compensation needs to meet customers' expectations because overcompensation or undercompensation leads to negative outcomes, such as decreased repurchase intention.

Originality/value

Our study provides insights into the effectiveness of compensation in the retail context and confirms the findings of Goode et al. (2017).

Details

Internet Research, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 February 2021

Abbas Tarhini, Puzant Balozain and F.Jordan Srour

This paper uses a cognitive analytics management approach to analyze, understand and solve the problems facing the implementation of information systems and help…

341

Abstract

Purpose

This paper uses a cognitive analytics management approach to analyze, understand and solve the problems facing the implementation of information systems and help management do the needed changes to enhance such a critical process; the emergency management system in the health industry is analyzed as a case study.

Design/methodology/approach

Cognitive analytics management (CAM) framework (Osman and Anouz, 2014) is used. Cognitive process: The right questions are asked to understand the behavior of every process and the flow of its corresponding data; critical data variables were identified, guidelines for identifying data sources were set. Analytics process: Techniques of data analytics were applied to the selected data sets, problems were identified in user–system interaction and in the system design. The analysis process helped the management in the management process to make right decisions for the right change.

Findings

Using the CAM framework, the analysis to the Lebanese Red Cross case study identified system user-behavior problems and also system design problems. It identified cases where distributed subsystems are vulnerable to time keeping errors and helped the management make knowledgeable decisions to overcome major obstacles by implementing several changes related to hardware design, software implementation, human resource training, operational and human-technology changes. CAM is a novel and feasible software engineering approach for handling system failures.

Originality/value

The paper uses CAM framework as an approach to overcome system failures and help management do the needed changes to enhance such a critical process. This work contributes to the software engineering literature by introducing CAM as a new agile methodology to be used when dealing with system failures. Furthermore, this study is an action research that validated the CAM theoretical framework in a health emergency context in Lebanon.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Irene R.R. Lu, Louise A. Heslop, D. Roland Thomas and Ernest Kwan

Country image (CI) has been one of the most studied topics in international business, marketing, and consumer behaviour of the past five decades. Nevertheless, there has…

1481

Abstract

Purpose

Country image (CI) has been one of the most studied topics in international business, marketing, and consumer behaviour of the past five decades. Nevertheless, there has been no critical assessment of this field of research. The purpose of this paper is to understand the status and evolution of CI research.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors review 554 articles published in academic journals over 35 years. The authors examine publication, authorship, and research procedure trends in these articles as an empirical and quantitative assessment of the field. The authors identify weaknesses and strengths, and the authors address disconcerting and encouraging trends.

Findings

The authors find a number of laudatory trends: CI research is becoming less US-centric, more theory driven, more sophisticated in methodology, evaluating more diverse product categories, and making use of multiple cue studies. There are, however, two major methodological concerns: poor replication and questionable generalizability of findings. The authors also noted the influence of CI articles has been decreasing, as well as their rate of publication in top tier journals.

Originality/value

Since the authors present data that reflect actual practices in the field and how such practices have changed across time, the authors believe the study is of substantial value to CI researchers, journal editors, and instructors whose curriculum includes CI. The critical assessment and subsequent recommendations are accordingly empirically justified.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 May 2019

Charlotte Blanche and Patrick Cohendet

In this chapter, the authors enter the world of ballet to be inspired by artistic teams. This original point of view proposes a complementary understanding of the dynamics…

Abstract

In this chapter, the authors enter the world of ballet to be inspired by artistic teams. This original point of view proposes a complementary understanding of the dynamics of routines replication where preserving the authenticity of the project’s intent is emphasized over economic efficiency considerations.

The authors propose that analyzing the remounting of a ballet as an in-depth extreme case study provides an opportunity to learn more about other aspects that can be relevant in transfer stories: the importance accorded to the intent of the routine to be transferred; the existence of a dialogical dynamic that engages artifacts and memories of this intent; the existence of a meta-routine that structures and enables the transfer of sub-routines across geographical distance in another context. The authors will see that, in this case, routines replication is also made possible through sharing of a routine’s ostensive aspect which is embedded in a professional culture.

The overarching priority in remounting a show is strict respect for the choreographer’s original intent. As replicator and imitator teams encounter the consequences of a new location and its characteristics, the authors will examine how they face the replication dilemma, coordinate themselves, and use innovation to achieve replication.

Details

Routine Dynamics in Action: Replication and Transformation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-585-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 May 2019

Igor Budak, Aleksandar Kiralj, Mario Sokac, Zeljko Santosi, Dominic Eggbeer and Sean Peel

Computer-aided design and additive manufacture (CAD/AM) technologies are sufficiently refined and meet the necessary regulatory requirements for routine incorporation into…

Abstract

Purpose

Computer-aided design and additive manufacture (CAD/AM) technologies are sufficiently refined and meet the necessary regulatory requirements for routine incorporation into the medical field, with long-standing application in surgeries of the maxillofacial and craniofacial regions. They have resulted in better medical care for patients and faster, more accurate procedures. Despite ever-growing evidence about the advantages of computer-aided planning, CAD and AM in surgery, detailed reporting on critical design decisions that enable methodological replication and the development and establishment of guidelines to ensure safety are limited. This paper aims to present a novel application of CAD and AM to a single-stage resection and reconstruction of fibrous dysplasia in the zygoma and orbit.

Design/methodology/approach

It is reported in sufficient fidelity to permit methods replication and design guideline developments in future cases, wherever they occur in the world. The collaborative approach included engineers, designers, surgeons and prosthetists to design patient-specific cutting guides and a custom implant. An iterative design process was used, until the desired shape and function were achieved, for both of the devices. The surgery followed the CAD plan precisely and without problems. Immediate post-operative subjective clinical judgements were of an excellent result.

Findings

At 19 months post-op, a CT scan was undertaken to verify the clinical and technical outcomes. Dimensional analysis showed maximum deviation of 4.73 mm from the plan to the result, while CAD-Inspection showed that the deviations ranged between −0.1 and −0.8 mm and that the majority of deviations were located around −0.3 mm.

Originality/value

Improvements are suggested and conclusions drawn regarding the design decisions considered critical to a successful outcome for this type of procedure in the future.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 March 2020

Alolote I. Amadi

This study investigates the level of variance in the real time demand for bagged cement, induced in response to the climatic sequence of the humid tropics, to support best…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the level of variance in the real time demand for bagged cement, induced in response to the climatic sequence of the humid tropics, to support best practice calls for a weather-responsive supply chain strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

Data on the consumption of cement and site works for 100 ongoing building construction sites were gathered for a period of 12 months. The variance partitioning capabilities of the Ordinary Least Squares and Hierarchical Linear Modelling forms of regression analysis are comparatively used to evaluate the sensitivity of cement demand to the meteorological profile of wet-humid climate

Findings

The study outcome provides statistical evidence demonstrating that the meteorological profile of wet-humid climate induces a significantly high percentage of the variance in the real-time demand for bagged cement on construction sites. However, nested within this variance, are the fixed effects of the cement footprint of the building architecture inherent in the locality. Particularly, positive changes to reduce the wet trade composition of buildings or compensating changes in technological bias, are necessary to combat weather interference in the humid tropics.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are exploratory, and not for the purposes of holistically forecasting cement demand, and can therefore only form part of a more comprehensive decision support system, bespoke to the study area.

Practical implications

The study outcome provides a back-end view to climatic adaptation in wet humid settings, making a compelling case for localized climate-risk adaptive supply chain strategies and policies geared towards sustainability in cement usage.

Originality/value

The study delineates the confounding impact of weather, distinct from local building architecture and technological bias, thus creating a methodological platform for replication and comparative productivity studies in diverse geographical areas.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 22 May 2013

Barbara A. Marinak and Linda B. Gambrell

Purpose – To provide classroom teachers with the rationale and methods necessary to grow the engagement of struggling readers.Design/methodology/approach – The chapter is…

Abstract

Purpose – To provide classroom teachers with the rationale and methods necessary to grow the engagement of struggling readers.Design/methodology/approach – The chapter is organized as a series of mini case studies.Findings – Provides a comprehensive description of the methods/practices used with each student or group of students in order to encourage methodological replication.Research limitations/implications – This is not an exhaustive overview of engaging methods, but the case studies should be familiar to classroom teachers and reading specialists. The authors carefully explain how the methods were differentiated for each student or group of students. In addition, the methods are described in sufficient detail so as to ensure that readers can utilize the methods and/or practices with their struggling readers.Practical implications – The chapter advocates that classroom teachers and/or reading specialists carefully consider motivation when planning intervention. The crafted case studies illuminate how such planning and delivery might be implemented.Originality/value of chapter – In order for struggling readers to engage with text for purpose and pleasure, a responsive approach is necessary. Such an approach considers motivation as a critical competent of effective intervention.

Details

School-Based Interventions for Struggling Readers, K-8
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-696-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Benjamin K. Seltzer, Deniz S. Ones and Arkun Tatar

The relationships between the Big Five personality traits and life and job satisfaction have been examined extensively. Despite this attention, however, most existing…

Abstract

Purpose

The relationships between the Big Five personality traits and life and job satisfaction have been examined extensively. Despite this attention, however, most existing theories focus on a few global dimensions of the Big Five while relying primarily upon a selection of theoretically relevant but unmeasured facets to illuminate their factor-level explanations. The purpose of this paper is to examine personality–satisfaction relationships for job and life domains at the facet level to better identify and explain why certain global Big Five traits consistently relate to satisfaction, taking both factors and facets into account.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from over 20 specific occupational samples were pooled meta-analytically to examine personality facet of job/life satisfaction relationships and their generalizability. Bifactor latent variable modeling using meta-analytic input was used to examine independent contributions of general and unique personality facets.

Findings

The dominance facet of extraversion, low self-esteem facet of neuroticism, and responsibility facet of conscientiousness were most closely related to satisfaction variables. There were independent contributions of general and unique facet level personality–satisfaction relations for the neuroticism and conscientiousness domains, but not for the extraversion domain.

Research limitations/implications

Findings contribute to the literature on the bandwidth–fidelity dilemma in measuring personality and theories involving personality at work.

Originality/value

This study established the generalizability of Big Five traits–satisfaction relations and identified the empirically supported personality paths to understanding job and life satisfaction. This study also demonstrated how meta-analysis can be combined with bifactor models to understand substantive relations.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2011

Janet Hoek, Philip Gendall and Jordan Louviere

The tobacco industry consistently opposes measures that would limit their marketing, but provides little empirical evidence to support its position. This paper aims to…

1388

Abstract

Purpose

The tobacco industry consistently opposes measures that would limit their marketing, but provides little empirical evidence to support its position. This paper aims to test claims that pictorial health warnings on tobacco products would be no more effective than text‐only warnings.

Design/methodology/approach

Three studies used face‐to‐face interviews with smokers and non‐smokers to compare pictorial and text‐only warnings. Two studies used semantic differential scales to estimate cognitive and affective responses to pictorial and text‐only warnings, and the Juster Scale to provide behavioural estimates. The final study used best worst scaling to compare paired pictorial and text‐only warnings.

Findings

Images featuring medical and social images elicited stronger affective, cognitive and behavioural responses than a control, text‐only message. Comparisons of refreshed text and pictorial warnings found the latter elicited stronger reactions while the former produced similar results to the control. Updating text warnings did not render these more effective; however, adding an image to an existing text warning made this more effective than the control.

Research limitations/implications

Arguments advanced by the tobacco industry need empirical analysis to assess their validity.

Social implications

This study provides evidence that pictorial health warnings are more effective than text warnings and suggests that refreshing the text used in warning labels, the alternative promoted by the tobacco industry, would be less effective than introducing pictorial warnings.

Originality/value

This is the first comparison of pictorial and refreshed text warnings; the findings challenge the tobacco industry's position on tobacco warning labels and contradict arguments used to oppose the introduction of pictorial warning labels.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Emma H. Wood and Jonathan Moss

Using techniques developed mainly in subjective well-being and “happiness” studies, the purpose of this paper is to discuss the applicability of these and related methods…

2251

Abstract

Purpose

Using techniques developed mainly in subjective well-being and “happiness” studies, the purpose of this paper is to discuss the applicability of these and related methods for understanding and evaluating the emotional responses experienced within the live music event environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The concept of “experience” is debated and set within the context of music events designed to create a specific type of emotional experience for the attendees. The main tools for researching experiences over a time period are considered focusing on the “experience sampling method” (ESM) (Csikszentmihalyi, 1997) and the “day reconstruction method” (Kahneman et al., 2004). These methods are critiqued in terms of their usefulness and practicality as research tools in the study of audience emotions.

Findings

A revised method was then developed and a small-scale trial undertaken at a live music event, the results of which are presented and discussed. A conceptual model illustrating the interconnectedness of experience is introduced as an example of the application of the data gathered through this method to theory development. The paper concludes by reflecting on both the methodological appropriateness and practicality of ESMs as a way of gathering valuable data on the emotions engendered by events.

Research limitations/implications

An obstacle yet to be overcome is using this data to predict attitudinal and behavioural change related to arts marketing goals. However, studies in other areas have clearly shown that emotional response is a significant indicator of future behaviour suggesting that the potential is there.

Practical implications

The trialled method provides a useful starting point for better understanding the complexity of emotional effects triggered at live music events.

Originality/value

The paper concludes that an adaptation of these methods has the potential to provide much needed rich and credible data on the feelings and emotional reactions triggered by different elements of a live event.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

Keywords

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