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Article
Publication date: 23 July 2019

Amrit Mann and Chris Wagstaff

Methamphetamine users commonly experience induced methamphetamine associated mental health symptoms. Currently, psychosocial treatment is implemented to reduce use;…

Abstract

Purpose

Methamphetamine users commonly experience induced methamphetamine associated mental health symptoms. Currently, psychosocial treatment is implemented to reduce use; however, to date, the effectiveness of psychosocial treatment in methamphetamine use and the associated mental health symptoms has not been reviewed. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review was performed by searching databases (PubMed, Embase, Ovid MEDLINE, PsychINFO and CINAHL) and following clear inclusion/exclusion criteria.

Findings

In total, 12 studies met the inclusion/exclusion criteria, measuring a variety of psychosocial interventions and measuring a variety of different mental health outcomes. Decreased methamphetamine use was observed in the five studies which recorded this.

Research limitations/implications

Most studies in this review were preliminary trials and only three were RCTs. Additionally, methamphetamine use is a particular problem in Japan and is becoming more prevalent in Europe, yet neither primary nor secondary searching identified papers from these regions.

Practical implications

While the findings may not provide sufficient supporting evidence to instigate changes in clinical practice, this work should be developed further, as it is clear that psychosocial interventions can be successful in treating this population.

Social implications

This review demonstrates that psychosocial treatments can improve symptoms associated with methamphetamine use. Reduction in mental health symptoms has been shown to attract individuals to drug use treatment and thus indirectly reducing methamphetamine use.

Originality/value

Given the consequences of methamphetamine for individuals and communities treatment options must be explored. A review of psychosocial interventions in the treatment of methamphetamine use and associated mental health symptoms had not been done previously. This review provides a foundation for further research.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 18 June 2019

Jorge Flores-Aranda, Mathieu Goyette, Valérie Aubut, Maxime Blanchette and Frédérick Pronovost

The purpose of this paper is to document the experience of current and former methamphetamine users on their crystal meth use patterns and on their use of services related…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to document the experience of current and former methamphetamine users on their crystal meth use patterns and on their use of services related to their chemsex practice.

Design/methodology/approach

For qualitative component, two focus groups were formed with nine current users of methamphetamine and eight former users. Thematic analysis was performed to know their experiences.

Findings

All participants were already engaging in chemsex with various substances before they first started using methamphetamine. Methamphetamine use led some to slam (methamphetamine or mephedrone injection). Some participants report that their sexual experiences were intensified early in their chemsex practice. They reported feeling more confident with their partners, feeling like they are sexually attractive and overcoming their barriers to sexuality. The intensification of methamphetamine use and, in particular, injection change the positive perception of sexual life. Thus, for some participants, substance use takes more space and their sexual experiences become less satisfactory.

Practical implications

Participants report the services that address the phenomenon of chemsex are still scarce in Quebec province. In addition, the few services available aim to relearn a sober sexuality. However, the mourning of the positive aspects of chemsex on sexual experiences seems still very little discussed. Greater consideration of positive chemsex experiences is needed in services that address this issue.

Originality/value

This project documented the perception of pleasure related to sexual practices among regular methamphetamine users. Their perception of pleasure will help develop services adapted to their reality.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article
Publication date: 17 February 2012

Nicole K. Lee, Angela M. Harney and Amy E. Pennay

The aim of this paper is to examine the temporal sequencing of methamphetamine use and the onset of mental health problems among a sample of dependent methamphetamine users.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to examine the temporal sequencing of methamphetamine use and the onset of mental health problems among a sample of dependent methamphetamine users.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a self‐reported timeline method to examine the sequencing of first use, regular use and problematic use of methamphetamine and mental health issues among 126 users with lifetime dependence.

Findings

The majority of the sample (69 per cent) reported previous mental health diagnosis or treatment. Of this sample, 22 per cent reported mental health problems prior to their first use of methamphetamine and 72 per cent reported mental health problems after first use of methamphetamine (with the rest around the same time or unsure). On the timeline, mental health symptoms were first indicated around a year after first regular use of methamphetamine and around the same time as problematic use. Respondents identified a lag time of five years between first problematic use of methamphetamine and seeking treatment for methamphetamine‐related problems, but those that received mental health treatment engaged in methamphetamine treatment earlier.

Practical implications

Among this sample, mental health problems coincided with problematic methamphetamine use (rather than any use) suggesting prevention efforts may be better directed at preventing transition to heavy use or use of potent forms or injecting, rather than directed at prevention of uptake. On this basis, stepped care might be appropriate for methamphetamine users.

Originality/value

Despite a substantial research literature establishing the link between methamphetamine use and mental health problems, little is known about the order of onset and the implications of this for treatment. This is one of the few studies specifically investigating the temporal sequencing of methamphetamine use, mental health symptoms and treatment seeking among a sample of dependent methamphetamine users.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Book part
Publication date: 31 October 2017

Kevin Bucciero

This chapter will develop a comprehensive review of methamphetamine usage with a concentration on North America. To develop a wider understanding of the use of this drug…

Abstract

This chapter will develop a comprehensive review of methamphetamine usage with a concentration on North America. To develop a wider understanding of the use of this drug, this chapter will examine the history and spatial component of methamphetamine. In order to achieve this, the research will review previous literature, which includes the pattern of its original manufacture in the United States to international locations such as Mexico. The research data will include two interviews with individuals involved in the underworld of meth use in Los Angeles. The chapter will then present outcomes based on the participant survey and secondary sources.

Details

Environmental Criminology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-377-9

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2020

Benjamin Petruzelka

The purpose of this paper is to improve the understanding of the relationship between region-specific regulations of medications used in the manufacture of illegal drugs…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to improve the understanding of the relationship between region-specific regulations of medications used in the manufacture of illegal drugs and illegal drug markets.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines a case study of the relationship between the regulation of medications containing pseudoephedrine in Czechia and neighbouring countries and the illegal drug market for methamphetamine in Czechia between 2006 and 2018. The description of this case is based on a review of the literature and a review of publicly available data sources.

Findings

The tightening of the regulation of medications containing pseudoephedrine in the Czech Republic led, in the years under study, to a gradual decrease in the number of packages sold and simultaneously to the illegal import of such medications from neighbouring countries with less strict regulations. At the same time, shifts in the drug market could be observed: the internationalisation of previously primarily domestic supply chains, the increased involvement of Vietnamese organised crime groups, the emergence of large-scale methamphetamine labs and a shift in production to countries with less strict regulations. The subsequent application of stricter controls in neighbouring countries was accompanied by further shifts in supply chains and increased imports from non-European countries.

Practical implications

The tightening of regulations of medications within a single country or single region might lead to significant and undesirable changes in drug markets and supply chains.

Originality/value

This paper provides a novel case study of the development of region-specific regulations of medications and their influence on illegal drug markets and supply chains in the Czech Republic and in the European context.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 July 2018

Gian Nurmaindah Hendianti and Penpaktr Uthis

This purpose of this paper is to describe methamphetamine relapse risk, examine the relationship between factors in the dynamic model of relapse and methamphetamine relapse risk.

Abstract

Purpose

This purpose of this paper is to describe methamphetamine relapse risk, examine the relationship between factors in the dynamic model of relapse and methamphetamine relapse risk.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 165 clients from the Substance Rehabilitation Center of National Narcotics Board in West Java, Indonesia were recruited. The research instruments included a demographic characteristic questionnaire and eight different tests: Drug Taking Confidence Questionnaire; Stimulant Effect Expectancy Questionnaire; Stage of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale version 8.0 for Drug; Coping Strategies Inventory Short Form; Positive Affect and Negative Affect Schedule; Desire for Speed Questionnaire; Social Support Questionnaire; and the Stimulant Relapse Risk Scale. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Pearson’s product moment correlation was used to test the relationship among variables.

Findings

Clients (63 percent) were at a moderate level of methamphetamine relapse risk (mean=56.33, SD=10.54). Outcome expectancy, positive emotional state, negative emotional state and craving were positive and had a significant correlation with relapse risk (r=0.261, r=0.380, r=0.370, r=0.509, p<0.01, respectively). Self-efficacy was negative and had a significant correlation with relapse risk (r=−0.316, p<0.01). Motivation, coping and social support had no correlation with relapse risk.

Originality/value

Two-thirds of the clients in a rehabilitation center have a tendency to relapse following treatment. Nursing intervention for early detection of methamphetamine relapse risk during treatment by using standardized instruments should be implemented.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2586-940X

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Owen Bowden-Jones, Claire Whitelock, Dima Abdulrahim, Stacey Hemmings, Alexander Margetts and Michael Crawford

The purpose of this paper is to examine patterns of drug use among a cohort of drug treatment-seeking drug-using gay men and other men who have sex with men (MSM), and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine patterns of drug use among a cohort of drug treatment-seeking drug-using gay men and other men who have sex with men (MSM), and whether these activities differ between, or predict, HIV status.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-sectional study was conducted in a specialist club drug clinic in London covering 407 consecutive attendees who identified as MSM. Substance use, including injecting drug use (IDU), associated sexual activity and self-reported HIV status were measured by clinical interview and National Drug Treatment Monitoring System data tool.

Findings

Over a 45-month period, 407 MSM attended the clinic. In total, 62.1 per cent were HIV positive, 48.9 per cent had injected drugs, 14.9 per cent reported needle sharing and 73.3 per cent used drugs to facilitate sex. The most commonly reported problem drugs were GHB/GBL (54.3 per cent) methamphetamine (47.7 per cent) and mephedrone (37.8 per cent). HIV status was associated with methamphetamine, mephedrone, IDU, sharing equipment, using drugs to facilitate sex, older age and older age of drug initiation, as well as Hepatitis C virology (HCV) status. Use of methamphetamine, HCV infection, older age and IDU predicted HIV positive status in a logistic regression model.

Practical implications

The findings describe a constellation of risk factors including high levels of IDU, sharing of equipment and high-risk sexual activity in a population with high rates of HIV positive serology. They also provide further evidence for a link between HIV infection and use of methamphetamine.

Social implications

The authors suggest a need for greater awareness of HIV-related risk activities and promotion of HIV prevention strategies for MSM by both sexual health and drug treatment services.

Originality/value

This paper is amongst the very first studies of its nature.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article
Publication date: 22 August 2010

Zhivan J. Alach

The aim of this paper is to identify a way by which the concepts of effects‐based operations (EBO), an approach to problem solving derived from military thought, might be…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to identify a way by which the concepts of effects‐based operations (EBO), an approach to problem solving derived from military thought, might be applied usefully to a law enforcement problem, namely methamphetamine in New Zealand.

Design/methodology/approach

The study involved analysis of relevant literature in the fields of EBO and systems thinking to identify the core principles for the modelling stage, followed by a series of semi‐structured discussions with subject matter experts to populate the model with relevant and accurate data.

Findings

The methamphetamine ecosystem in New Zealand can be modelled using a system‐of‐systems approach, which is the first stage in a broader EBO approach. The model is complex, involves a broad range of processes, actors, and workflows, and can be constantly enhanced as new information comes to light. Follow‐up stages are required to identify potential targeting opportunities, and will be the subject of later articles.

Originality/value

This study is the first, or one of the first, to attempt to use the concept of EBO to attack police problems. It is thus highly original, and could be extremely useful to other analysts seeking new ways to conceptualise problems.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2020

Emery R. Eaves, Ricky L. Camplain, Monica R. Lininger and Robert T. Trotter II

The purpose of this paper is to characterize the relationship between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and substance use among people incarcerated in a county jail.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to characterize the relationship between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and substance use among people incarcerated in a county jail.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was administered to 199 individuals incarcerated in a Southwest county jail as part of a social-epidemiological exploration of converging comorbidities in incarcerated populations. Among 96 participants with complete ACEs data, the authors determined associations between individual ACEs items and a summative score with methamphetamine (meth), heroin, other opiates and cocaine use and binge drinking in the 30 days prior to incarceration using logistic regression.

Findings

People who self-reported use of methamphetamine, heroin, other opiates or cocaine in the 30 days prior to incarceration had higher average ACEs scores. Methamphetamine use was significantly associated with living with anyone who served time in a correctional facility and with someone trying to make them touch sexually. Opiate use was significantly associated with living with anyone who was depressed, mentally ill or suicidal; living with anyone who used illegal street drugs or misused prescription medications; and if an adult touched them sexually. Binge drinking was significantly associated with having lived with someone who was a problem drinker or alcoholic.

Social implications

The findings point to a need for research to understand differences between methamphetamine use and opiate use in relation to particular adverse experiences during childhood and a need for tailored intervention for people incarcerated in jail.

Originality/value

Significant associations between methamphetamine use and opiate use and specific ACEs suggest important entry points for improving jail and community programming.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2020

Ma. Regina M. Hechanova, Jennel C. Reyes, Avegale C. Acosta and Antover P. Tuliao

The purpose of this study is to evaluate a psychosocial treatment program for prisoners incarcerated because of methamphetamine use. It compared the outcomes of prisoners…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate a psychosocial treatment program for prisoners incarcerated because of methamphetamine use. It compared the outcomes of prisoners who received the program while incarcerated, those who were released and received the treatment as part of community-based drug recovery program and a waitlist-control group (WC) with no treatment.

Design/methodology/approach

A quasi-experimental design was use with pre- and post-test surveys administered to three groups: a WC group, a pre-release treatment-while-incarcerated (TWI) group, and a post-release outpatient treatment group (OP). Surveys measured recovery skills, life skills and substance use disorder (SUD) symptoms were administered before and after the intervention.

Findings

Results revealed that at baseline OP and TWI had significant higher recovery skills compared to WC group. However, in terms of life skills, there was no significant difference observed among the WC, OP and TWI group at baseline. TWI had a significantly lower number of SUD symptoms compared to the WC group at baseline. As hypothesized, findings revealed significant changes in recovery and life skills among the OP and TWI group compared to the WC group. No significant change in SUD scores were observed for all groups.

Research limitations/implications

A major limitation of the study was the use of a quasi-experimental design because legal issues did not allow a randomized control trial. Future research using randomized controlled trial designs would provide more robust conclusions on the impact of the intervention. The study design was also limited to pre- and post-evaluation. Further studies are encouraged to look at longitudinal outcomes of appears on SUD symptoms and possibility of relapse.

Practical implications

Given that there were no significant differences in outcomes between OP and TWI groups, results suggest that the program may serve either as a pre- or post-release program for incarcerated drug users. However, results also suggest that completion is higher when the program is used as a pre-release program. Delivering the program prior to release also reduces challenges related to attrition including conflict in schedules and the lack of resources for transportation.

Social implications

The study suggests the value of psychosocial treatment as opposed to punitive approaches in dealing with drug use. In particular, delivering interventions prior to release can prepare participants for problems they may encounter during reintegration and prevent recidivism. In a country where drug-related killings are on the rise, the study presents an alternate and restorative justice approach.

Originality/value

The study addresses a dearth in the literature on psychosocial intervention for methamphetamine users. It also fills a vacuum in studies from developing countries such as the Philippines.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

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