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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2019

Sasan T. Khorasani, Jennifer Cross and Omid Maghazei

By applying a systematic literature review, this paper aims to identify the major healthcare problem domains (i.e. target areas) for lean supply chain management (LSCM…

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1628

Abstract

Purpose

By applying a systematic literature review, this paper aims to identify the major healthcare problem domains (i.e. target areas) for lean supply chain management (LSCM) and to provide a list of the most common techniques for implementing LSCM in healthcare. Moreover, this study intends to investigate various contingency factors that may have influenced the selection of LSCM target areas or the application of LSCM techniques by healthcare organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review was carried out following the method presented by Tranfield et al. (2003). Thereby, 280 peer-reviewed journal articles, published between 1995 and 2018, were selected, profiled and reviewed. In total, 75 papers were also selected for a qualitative analysis, known as meta-study, on the basis of high relevancy to the research objectives.

Findings

This work extracts, from previous research, a set of target areas for improving supply chain in healthcare by applying lean approaches. The work also unifies the language of lean thinking and supply chain in healthcare by defining metaphors in circumstances under which healthcare organizations pursue similar objectives from their supply chain management and lean programs (Schmitt, 2005). This paper also outlines a list of applications of lean for supply chain improvement in healthcare. Finally, a set of contingency factors in the field of lean supply chain in healthcare is found via the published literature.

Practical implications

This paper provides insights for decision-makers in the healthcare industry regarding the benefits of implementing LSCM, and it identifies contingency factors affecting the implementation of LSCM principles for healthcare. Implementing LSCM can help healthcare organizations improve the following domains: internal interaction between employees, supply chain cost management, medication distribution systems, patient safety and instrument utilization.

Social implications

The research shows potential synthesis of LSCM with the healthcare industry’s objectives, and, thus, the outcome of this research is likely to have positive influence on the quality and cost of healthcare services. The objectives of the healthcare industry are cost reduction and providing better service quality, and LSCM implementation could be an effective solution to help healthcare to achieve these objectives.

Originality/value

The prime value of this paper lies in conducting a systematic literature review using a meta-study to identify the major factors of implementing LSCM in healthcare. Only a few other studies have been published in the literature about LSCM in healthcare.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

Keywords

Content available
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1073

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2013

Stephen Mark Rosenbaum, Stephan Billinger and Nils Stieglitz

Corruption has traditionally been associated with an absence of pro-social norms such as trust and altruism. This paper challenges this view by examining market corruption…

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1210

Abstract

Purpose

Corruption has traditionally been associated with an absence of pro-social norms such as trust and altruism. This paper challenges this view by examining market corruption – one-shot exchange transactions between strangers in the shadow of the law. The paper aims to propose that in the absence of repeat interactions and legal remedies to prevent contractual violations, acts of market corruption will require strong norms of generalized trust and altruism. As such, pro-social norms facilitate, rather than mitigate, market corruption.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper utilizes meta-analysis to examine the relationship between pro-social behavior in economic experiments and prevailing corruption levels.

Findings

The results from meta-analyses of both trust- and dictator game experiments show positive, significant relationships between pro-social norms and prevailing corruption levels.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of the paper suggest the need for further research into the relationship between societal norms and different types of corruption.

Practical implications

Policymakers should be wary about attempting to combat corruption through bottom-up policies designed to strengthen pro-social norms. Such policies may be counter-productive in that they are likely to provide the breeding ground for more acts of market corruption.

Originality/value

Conventional wisdom suggests a negative association between pro-social norms and corruption levels. The paper proposes that the relationship is not that simple. Indeed, the meta-study findings suggest the reverse relationship in the case of petty (market) corruption.

Details

International Journal of Development Issues, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1446-8956

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 December 2016

Stephen Mark Rosenbaum, Stephan Billinger, Daniel Kwabena Twerefou and Wakeel Atanda Isola

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of income inequality on cooperative propensities, and thus the ability of individuals to resolve collective action dilemmas.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of income inequality on cooperative propensities, and thus the ability of individuals to resolve collective action dilemmas.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a meta-study of 32 developing country lab experiments correlating cooperative behaviour with prevailing Gini coefficients. Furthermore, the paper conducts standard dictator- and public goods game (PGG) experiments with culturally and demographically similar subject pools in two West African countries characterized by high and persistent variation in national income inequality.

Findings

The meta-study findings of a significant negative relationship between income inequality and contribution levels in the PGG are corroborated by the own laboratory experimental findings that participants in more unequal Nigeria are significantly less altruistic and exhibit significantly lower propensities to cooperate than their more egalitarian Ghanaian counterparts. Moreover, the latter findings are robust when controlling for personal income levels.

Practical implications

The findings have nontrivial implications for collective action theorists and practitioners seeking to elicit tacit cooperation in developing countries.

Originality/value

The major contributions of this paper are the novel meta-analysis and the first attempt to examine the influence of personal income levels on cooperative behaviour in societies characterized by differential levels of income inequality.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 43 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2015

Hector Rocha

This paper aims to analyse the impact of clusters on development and growth at the firm and regional level in Latin America (LA). The past 20 years have witnessed an…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyse the impact of clusters on development and growth at the firm and regional level in Latin America (LA). The past 20 years have witnessed an acceleration of cluster initiatives, assuming their positive impact on firm performance and regional development. However, theoretical development and empirical meta-studies in emerging countries to validate this assumed relationship are scarce.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews empirical evidence from a population of 123 studies and a sample of 45 empirical studies including 216 clusters in LA.

Findings

It concludes that clusters contribute to both development and growth at the firm- and regional-level contingent to factors such as cluster stage of development, collective efficiency, the pattern of governance of the value chain and the sector in which the firm operates; however, clusters are also a potential source of socio-economic divides.

Originality/value

Therefore, these results qualify the conclusions of studies of clusters in developed countries (Porter, 2003; Delgado et al., 2010).

Details

Management Research: The Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

Endrit Kromidha and Jose-Rodrigo Cordoba-Pachon

This study aims to map the dynamics of e-government rhetoric through a discourse analysis. The discussion and understanding is based on an identification and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to map the dynamics of e-government rhetoric through a discourse analysis. The discussion and understanding is based on an identification and interpretation of emerging concepts in e-government reports and research journals. The goal is to unveil established concepts that influence e-government policy development in the public administration context.

Design/methodology/approach

Institutional discourse and a policy cycle model are initially selected to guide an inter-textual meta-analysis and meta-synthesis of relevant e-government and public administration outlets. Key concepts are analysed based on their frequency in order of appearance and proximity to each-other. Themes emerging from concept-ideas feed-back to the theory by helping us to suggest a new e-government policy development framework informed by practice and research domains.

Findings

The findings suggest that although a number of concept-ideas are being institutionalized in the field of e-government, there are persisting differences and discourses between public administration and e-government reports and journals. Most of the conceptual gaps identified by this study are related to emerging issues like e-government evaluation, engagement with end-users and connection gaps between policy, practice and research.

Originality/value

This study advances the use of discursive institutionalism in e-government research by suggesting that concepts and ideas are institutionalized not only through discourse assimilation, but also by attracting and being able to keep other concept-ideas closely related into themes. Different policy development paths identified in e-government practice and research domains should be jointly considered by policy makers, managers and researchers to improve their implementation.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Terry Gibson and Ben Wisner

The purpose of this paper is to report on the creation of innovative methods for engaging in conversations about everyday risk.

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1550

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on the creation of innovative methods for engaging in conversations about everyday risk.

Design/methodology/approach

A range of methods from conventional survey research to open-ended, semi-structured conversations and focus groups were used in the series of studies that serve as the subject of this meta-study. The meta-study uses participant observation, key informant interviews and project reports to narrate and evaluate the evolution of Frontline as an action planning, monitoring, advocacy and research tool.

Findings

The Views from the Frontline (VFL) methods began as the bottom-up mirror of a top-down monitoring approach used by the United Nations (Hyogo Framework for Action Monitor). Limitations of such bottom up monitoring led to creation of guidelines for formalising local knowledge resulting from actions – Action at the Frontline (AFL) and, later, Frontline, a flexible tool for eliciting experiences of everyday risk. The earlier VFL monitoring approach had shared outsiders’ assumptions about the nature of the “problem” and limited the degree to which local residents could express their own experiences and priorities.

Originality/value

Extensive use of this suite of methods has shown that civil society organisations are fully capable of conducting credible research when properly supported and motivated. Use of these methods has so far provided strong support for policy advocacy at the global scale, has had moderate success in liaison with national policy makers and slow but promising results as a learning/action tool at the local scale. Frontline has as yet untapped potential as a resource for academic research.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2014

Saul Berman and Anthony Marshall

From interviews in 2013 with more than 875 CEOs of companies in a variety of industries from around the world, IBM researchers found that the majority of them rank…

Abstract

Purpose

From interviews in 2013 with more than 875 CEOs of companies in a variety of industries from around the world, IBM researchers found that the majority of them rank technology as the top issue they expect will exert the strongest influence on their organizations and strategy. this paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This report is the third installment in an ongoing Global C-suite Study, the seventeenth such IBM study to focus on the C-suite. To compile the data for the meta study, between February and June 2013, researchers met with 4,183 top executives, representing a wide range of public and private sector enterprises in more than 20 industries and 70 countries. This report focuses on the responses of more than 875 CEOs from 67 countries who participated in the meta study.

Findings

Analysis of the interviews identified three responses proactive firms have adopted to prepare for the future: embrace disruption; build shared value; and dare to be open.

Research limitations/implications

Create experimentation spaces. Runaway innovation requires places and spaces where people can think, interact and experiment. The creation of these innovation spaces should be a priority. These should include: physical spaces where co-located people with different backgrounds can cross-pollinate each other’s ideas; virtual spaces where large numbers of people across different locations can focus on specific topics; and the building of business ecosystems. Business environments are beginning to evolve from markets to ecosystems. Organizations that identify new ways to serve customers holistically will define new business ecosystems and benefit the most.

Practical implications

Taking action to embrace disruption: move out of bounds. Bringing together people from different industries, backgrounds, regions – and even generations – will be essential to predict and respond to new competitive threats. Expanding partnerships to deepen innovation capabilities will speed the discovery of new technologies and new business models.

Originality/value

CEOs in just about every industry have learned that customers, partners and employees that collaborate can go further, faster in an era of runaway innovation. Many are pushing the boundaries on their organizations as a result – opening up to empower collaboration among individuals and moving away from command-and-control hierarchies. In just one year the number of CEOs determined to open up their organizations has increased an astounding 27 percent.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 42 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2020

Markus Blut

The use of meta-analysis in information systems (IS) research has increased. Because this research domain has matured and an increasing number of empirical studies have…

Abstract

Purpose

The use of meta-analysis in information systems (IS) research has increased. Because this research domain has matured and an increasing number of empirical studies have become available, meta-analysis is now perceived as a useful approach to synthesize an increasing body of empirical research. The present paper gives an overview of meta-analytical techniques, the evolution of meta-analysis in IS, the focus of these studies and method choices made by authors.

Design/methodology/approach

This overview is based on 100 meta-analysis studies published in IS journals. These meta-analytical studies synthesize data from 6,262 empirical studies, and the meta-analyses were published between 1989 and 2020. The studies were coded with regard to 16 major method choices that IS researchers made when conducting meta-analyses.

Findings

This overview describes the key areas of meta-analysis (e.g. strategy and firm performance) and the journals that publish the meta-analysis. This overview also identifies method issues where meta-analyses have improved in recent years as well as issues that require some attention. Scholars receive guidance about good practices in terms of 16 major method choices related to (1) problem formulation, (2) literature search, (3) coding information, (4) analyzing and integrating effect sizes and (5) interpreting results and reporting findings.

Originality/value

Addressing the identified method issues helps authors of future meta-analyses to increase the transparency of reporting and the likelihood of getting published. The substantive findings of a meta-analysis also often depend on researchers' method choices. Similar overviews exist for other disciplines, such as marketing and management.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 121 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

Simplice A. Asongu

– The purpose of this paper is to bridge the gap between the pros and cons of a questionable finance-growth nexus.

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6807

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to bridge the gap between the pros and cons of a questionable finance-growth nexus.

Design/methodology/approach

Over 20 fundamental characteristics that have influenced the debate over the last decades have been examined. The empirical evidence is based on 196 outcomes from 20 studies. The author assesses the degree of heterogeneity and identify causes of the observed differentiation.

Findings

The findings also show evidence of publication bias. Overall, a genuine effect exists between financial development and economic growth. A finance-growth nexus might not be appealing in our era because of: endogeneity-based estimations, publication bias, and effects of financial activity. A historical justification has also been discussed.

Practical implications

Encouraging the publication of results with findings that are not consistent with the mainstream positive finance-growth nexus should provide new scholarly insights into the relationship. Depending on the specific context of sampled countries, the role of policy has also been to encourage financial development through measures that may expose countries to negative external shocks like financial crises. Policy makers that have been viewing the challenges of development exclusively from this point of view for the rewards of growth may not be getting the financial dynamics correctly.

Originality/value

Very few meta-analysis studies have focused on the finance-growth nexus.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 41 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

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