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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1990

Gordon Wills, Sherril H. Kennedy, John Cheese and Angela Rushton

To achieve a full understanding of the role ofmarketing from plan to profit requires a knowledgeof the basic building blocks. This textbookintroduces the key concepts in…

Abstract

To achieve a full understanding of the role of marketing from plan to profit requires a knowledge of the basic building blocks. This textbook introduces the key concepts in the art or science of marketing to practising managers. Understanding your customers and consumers, the 4 Ps (Product, Place, Price and Promotion) provides the basic tools for effective marketing. Deploying your resources and informing your managerial decision making is dealt with in Unit VII introducing marketing intelligence, competition, budgeting and organisational issues. The logical conclusion of this effort is achieving sales and the particular techniques involved are explored in the final section.

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Management Decision, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2002

Jai‐Ok Kim, Sandra Forsythe, Qingliang Gu and Sook Jae Moon

This study examined the relationship of consumer values, needs and purchase behavior in two Asian consumer markets, China and South Korea. Between self‐directed values and…

Abstract

This study examined the relationship of consumer values, needs and purchase behavior in two Asian consumer markets, China and South Korea. Between self‐directed values and social affiliation values, self‐directed values were the underlying determinant of needs to be satisfied by apparel products. Among the three types of needs identified to be satisfied through apparel (i.e. experiential, social and functional needs), experiential needs were the most important needs that influenced apparel purchases of female consumers in both Asian markets. Consumers in both country markets exhibited brand loyal behavior in apparel purchases, fulfilling all three needs. However, actualization patterns of each need through brand loyal behavior differed between the two consumer samples. While for brand‐loyal Chinese consumers experiential image was the most important aspect of the branded apparel appeal to female consumers, social image with performance quality assurance was a more important feature of the branded apparel appeal to consumers in Korea. Implications for brand image management for international markets were discussed.

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Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 18 March 2019

Yuanyuan Feng and Denise E. Agosto

Building on theoretical foundation of personal information management (PIM) in information science, this paper seeks to understand how activity tracker users manage their…

Abstract

Purpose

Building on theoretical foundation of personal information management (PIM) in information science, this paper seeks to understand how activity tracker users manage their personal health information generated by their devices and to elucidate future activity tracking technology in support of personal health information management (PHIM). This paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a web survey study with a specific group of activity tracker users – amateur runners. This survey collected both quantitative and qualitative data on participants’ engagement with activity tracking technology, their PHIM practices with the information generated by the technology and how their needs were being met by their activity tracking technology use and PHIM practices.

Findings

Amateur runners surveyed in this study exhibit long-term engagement and frequent interaction with activity tracking technology. They also engage in PHIM practices by using a range of PHIM tools and performing various PHIM activities. Furthermore, they use activity tracking technology and engage in PHIM practices to meet various health/fitness-related needs and information needs, while some of these needs such as performance needs and overarching needs are only partially met or unmet.

Originality/value

This research discusses amateur runners as power users of activity tracking technology, provides timely updates to PIM and PHIM research in light of a new type of personal health information, and generates design considerations for future activity tracking technology in support of PHIM. It also brings together previously disparate research regarding everyday life PHIM in information science, human–computer interaction and health informatics.

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2010

Juita‐Elena Yusuf

This study sets out to examine the effectiveness of US start‐up assistance programs in meeting support needs of nascent entrepreneurs. It also aims to address whether…

Abstract

Purpose

This study sets out to examine the effectiveness of US start‐up assistance programs in meeting support needs of nascent entrepreneurs. It also aims to address whether (in)effectiveness influences entrepreneurs' perceptions of the value of the support provided by assistance programs.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data from the US Panel Study of Entrepreneurial Dynamics, the research answers three questions: What are the nascent entrepreneurs' support needs? What assistance do entrepreneurs receive from assistance programs? How do entrepreneurs value the assistance? These are used to determine: effectiveness of assistance programs, defined as the extent to which assistance provided addresses entrepreneurs' support needs; and the impact of effectiveness on perceived value of the assistance.

Findings

Assistance programs were effective in addressing the entrepreneur's support needs 26 percent of the time. However, entrepreneurs continued to perceive the support as being valuable, regardless of the lack of effectiveness. A likely explanation is that there is a mismatch between entrepreneurs' latent and expressed needs.

Practical implications

Three implications are: more effort may be needed to assist entrepreneurs in identifying their latent needs; effectiveness as defined in the study may not be the most appropriate approach; policymakers and program administrators should focus on making sure that the “right” entrepreneurial needs are being met.

Originality/value

In contrast with other studies that focus on entrepreneurs' satisfaction, the research measures assistance program effectiveness from the perspective of meeting entrepreneurs' support needs. Whether support services meet the needs of the entrepreneur could be a precursor to satisfaction, so this dimension of effectiveness should be examined.

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Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1988

John Cheese, Abby Day and Gordon Wills

An updated version of the original (1985) text, the book covers all aspects of marketing and selling bank services: the role of marketing; behaviour of customers;…

Abstract

An updated version of the original (1985) text, the book covers all aspects of marketing and selling bank services: the role of marketing; behaviour of customers; intelligence, planning and organisation; product decisions; promotion decisions; place decisions; price decisions; achieving sales. Application questions help to focus the readers' minds on key issues affecting practice.

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International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 9 December 2019

Jennifer Clegg and Sarah Craven-Staines

The purpose of this paper is to further understand the needs of carers when a relative with dementia is admitted to an organic impatient ward.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to further understand the needs of carers when a relative with dementia is admitted to an organic impatient ward.

Design/methodology/approach

A constructivist grounded theory approach was employed to generate a substantive theory to understand the needs of carers and how staff perceive carer needs when a relative is admitted to a dementia ward. Five relatives and six members of staff were interviewed using purposive and theoretical sampling. Interview transcripts were analysed using initial, focused and theoretical coding using constant comparative methods to develop the end theory.

Findings

The grounded theory concluded that carers have three categories of needs: “The Safe and Cared for Relative”, “The Informed Carer and “The Understanding, Responsive and Available Service”. Underpinning the needs are the relationships between carers, their relative and staff. Three barriers were identified which can impact on these needs being effectively met. These identified barriers were: Loss, Time and Ineffective Communication.

Originality/value

The grounded theory demonstrates that carers needs fundamentally relate to their relatives being safe and cared for and being included and informed during the admission. Relationships can be ruptured when a barrier prevents the needs from being effectively met. Recommendations are made to aim to reduce the impact of the barriers and to aid staff in developing their understanding of the carer experience.

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2020

Sarah-Louise Mitchell and Moira Clark

This paper aims to explore how volunteers choose one nonprofit organisation (NPO) rather than another. It identifies the drivers of choice, and the relationship between…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how volunteers choose one nonprofit organisation (NPO) rather than another. It identifies the drivers of choice, and the relationship between them, to enable NPOs to strengthen their volunteer recruitment.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 51 service-delivery volunteers were interviewed, drawn from 5 leading NPOs. A laddering technique was used to understand the context in which the choice of organisation was made and the underlying personal needs and goals. The data was analysed using means-end chain (MEC) methodology to uncover the relationships between, and hierarchy of, the decision drivers.

Findings

Brand, cause, and role were found to be important in meeting personal needs and goals through volunteering. The paper makes three contributions. Firstly, it presents a clearer understanding of NPO choice through adopting an integrated theoretical perspective. Secondly, it identifies the decision-making process and key relationships between the attributes of the NPO, the consequences for the volunteer, and the connection to their personal needs. Finally, the study makes an important contribution to literature through presenting a new conceptual framework of volunteer decision-making in the nonprofit context to act as a catalyst for future research.

Research limitations/implications

This research is both impactful through, and limited by, its context selection: regular service-delivery volunteers from five NPOs within two causes. The paper presents a rich research stream to extend this understanding to other nonprofit stakeholders, other causes including medical volunteer, and smaller NPOs.

Practical implications

In an increasingly competitive nonprofit environment with a growing need to support the vulnerable in society, NPO sustainability is dependent on their ability to recruit new volunteers. NPOs compete not only with other organisations with similar causes but also those offering similar volunteering roles, and other uses of time to meet personal needs such as sport, career, or community. Understanding how volunteers make their choice of NPO rather than other uses of their time is of vital importance to make the most effective use of scarce marketing resources. This paper contributes to that practitioner understanding.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to extend the understanding of generic motivations of volunteers to consider specific choice of NPO. Unlike previous literature, the authors bring together theory on brand, cause, and role with personal needs. The authors are also the first to apply MEC methodology to the nonprofit context to uncover the personal underlying, less salient reasons behind NPO choice and the relationship between them.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 55 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2010

David Wright

This purpose of this paper is to identify principal stakeholders and needs in e‐inclusion, with particular reference to senior citizens, determining to what extent those…

Abstract

Purpose

This purpose of this paper is to identify principal stakeholders and needs in e‐inclusion, with particular reference to senior citizens, determining to what extent those needs are being met or could be met by other stakeholders. It considers inclusive stakeholder organisational structures that could address unmet needs.

Design/methodology/approach

Although the European Commission (EC), Member States, local authorities, industry, and researchers have called for greater collaboration and partnerships among stakeholders to overcome the so‐called digital divides, little attention has been giv]en to the form of collaboration. Reviewing various policy‐oriented documents, this paper compiles a list of principal stakeholders and their e‐inclusion needs, reviews existing multi‐stakeholder undertakings and partnership structures as candidates for addressing needs not already met.

Findings

Many important e‐inclusion needs are not addressed by any multi‐stakeholder undertaking. Some structured collaboration or partnership should address those needs. A new structure should not merely represent all interested stakeholders, but involve them in decision‐making processes.

Research limitations/implications

This is a conceptual paper, constrained by length from producing a detailed list of needs. Similarly, although the paper identifies 12 different stakeholder categories, some could be further segmented.

Practical implications

Further research and analysis could be undertaken sourcing each identified need, perhaps adding others and further segmenting stakeholder categories.

Originality/value

The paper is of value to stakeholders involved or interested in e‐inclusion efforts. It uses a novel, straight‐forward, approach for identifying stakeholders and needs, who can meet those needs and who is addressing those needs.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2012

Mohammad Hajizadeh, Luke B. Connelly, James R.G. Butler and Aredshir Khosravi

This paper uses a unique nationwide survey data derived from the 2003 Utilisation of Health Services Survey (UHSS) in Iran (n=16,935) to analyse inequities of health care…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper uses a unique nationwide survey data derived from the 2003 Utilisation of Health Services Survey (UHSS) in Iran (n=16,935) to analyse inequities of health care utilisation.

Design/methodology/approach

Concentration indices are used to measure socioeconomic inequality in actual use of the five types of health services, and in unmet need for two of those types of service (any ambulatory care and hospital admissions). Horizontal inequity indices are employed to examine inequity in ambulatory and hospital care. Generalised linear model (GLM) was employed to investigate factors contributing to the phenomena of “unmet need” and “met unneed”. Moreover, a decomposition analysis of inequality is performed to determine the contributions of each factor to the inequality of “unmet need”.

Findings

Results suggest that self‐reported need for ambulatory and inpatient care is concentrated among the poor, whereas the utilisation of ambulatory and inpatient care were generally distributed proportionally. Results of horizontal inequity indices show that the distributions of any ambulatory care and hospital admissions are pro‐rich. The probability of “unmet need” for ambulatory care was higher among wealthier individuals. The decomposition analysis demonstrates that the wealth index, health insurance, and region of residence are the most important factors contributing to the concentration of “unmet need” for ambulatory health care among the poor. Results also illustrate that higher wealth quintiles used more unneeded ambulatory care than their poorer counterparts.

Originality/value

A special characteristic of the UHSS is that it contains questions about the need for medical services use and about actual services use. This characteristic provides an opportunity to measure the inequality of health care consumption against self‐assessed treatment needs, as well as an analysis of which observables are associated with “unmet need”. Moreover, the incidence of health care use when it is reported as not needed can be analysed with this dataset. The analysis of this phenomenon – which we refer to as “met unneed” – is another novel aspect of this work.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2009

Roger Bullock

In the desire to improve outcomes for children in care, the issue of those individuals placed by local authorities in residential establishments run by external agencies…

Abstract

In the desire to improve outcomes for children in care, the issue of those individuals placed by local authorities in residential establishments run by external agencies has become especially salient. In addition to questions of quality and value for money, there are concerns about children becoming detached from local services, especially as many of the placements selected are outside the local authorities' geographical boundaries. This study looks at 262 children so placed in eight English local authorities. It was found that although there were common presenting problems, such as a need for specialist therapy or to reduce difficult behaviour, the children's circumstances varied and four distinct groups of children with common needs were identified. The use of such placements also varied across the authorities and did not mirror their numbers of children in care. The factors associated with the use of externally purchased residential placements and differences between those placed internally and externally are explored. A framework for developing new approaches for difficult adolescents and suggestions about fruitful service development are offered.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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