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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2021

Esra Alniacik, Ezgi F. Erbas Kelebek and Umit Alniacik

The purpose of this study is to examine how – if any – does message framing moderates the previously documented positive effect of organizational identification on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine how – if any – does message framing moderates the previously documented positive effect of organizational identification on unethical pro-organizational behavior (UPB).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used vignette methodology to manipulate message framing and organizational identification in a 2 × 2 between-subjects experimental design to test research hypotheses. In total, 332 undergraduate students in the senior year of banking and management participated in the experiment. Two-way analysis of variance was used for data analyses.

Findings

Message framing is found to moderate the effect of organizational identification on UPB. Organizational identification posed a stronger effect on intentions to engage UPB when a supervisor announces a critical situation by using a positively framed message than (s)he frames it negatively.

Research limitations/implications

Using undergraduate students as subjects is an important limitation to external validity and generalizability of the findings. More realistic field experiments can be conducted by using real employees and factual firms in future studies.

Practical implications

Managers should be careful when using over-motivating language to employees on critical issues. Under intense stress, a managerial message over-emphasizing “gain” can prompt highly identified employees to conduct misbehavior.

Social implications

Unethical behavior brings negative consequences for organizations, even if it is conducted for the benefit of the organization. To prevent any tendency toward UPB, management communication must clearly highlight the delicate boundary between being attached to the organization and going beyond the rules for the organizational goals.

Originality/value

The study findings shed more light on the relationship between organizational identification and UPB, allowing us to see that the relationship is not always linear. In addition to over-identification, reciprocity and neutralization processes, the framing may be another explanation to varying effect of organizational identification on UPB. Supervisors’ communication style can influence employee behavior in controversial issues linked to UPB.

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Book part
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Jessica G. Myrick

It is not surprising that the dominant cognitive frame through which most audiences view climate change is that of an environmental problem. However, this messaging

Abstract

It is not surprising that the dominant cognitive frame through which most audiences view climate change is that of an environmental problem. However, this messaging strategy has proven susceptible to counter-attacks, defensing processing, and other cognitive biases. As such, many environmental advocates are switching gears. From Barack Obama to Pope Francis, the environment-as-public-health-concern narrative is increasingly found in climate change messages. This strategy involves making the abstract issue of climate change more concrete by tying it to negative health impacts, like asthma, heat-related illness, and the spread of disease. Understanding why and for whom this strategy is persuasive, particularly in a social media context where users often encounter persuasive climate change messages, can help advance theory and practice.

The purpose of this chapter is two-fold: 1.) Test the effects of climate message frame (damage to nature or damage to public health), message source (liberal or conservative organization), and the use of visual human exemplars (present or absent) in social media messages; and, 2.) Assess the predictive utility of different conceptual frameworks (personification, construal level theory, and moral foundations theory) as explanatory mechanisms for persuasive social media climate message effects. The results of a nation-wide experiment reveal that the use of visual exemplars matters when climate change is framed as an environmental problem, but otherwise message frame, source, and visual exemplar use have little impact on policy attitudes. Further analyses demonstrated that multiple conceptual mechanisms related to the aforementioned theories help explain social media effects on climate change attitudes.

Details

Climate Change, Media & Culture: Critical Issues in Global Environmental Communication
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-968-7

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Article
Publication date: 7 December 2020

Xiaoting Xu, Mengqing Yang, Yuxiang Chris Zhao and Qinghua Zhu

Based on the examination of the roles of message framing and evidence type, this study made an analysis of the promotion methods of intention and information need towards…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on the examination of the roles of message framing and evidence type, this study made an analysis of the promotion methods of intention and information need towards HPV vaccination.

Design/methodology/approach

The study conducted a 2 (gain-framed messages vs loss-framed messages) × 2 (statistical evidence vs narrative evidence) quasi-experimental design built upon theories of message framing and evidence type. This experiment recruited college students who were not vaccinated against HPV as participants. The analysis of variance (ANOVA), the analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), and the independent sample T-test were used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results (N = 300) indicate that (1) Loss-framed messages will lead to a more favorable intention towards HPV vaccination than gain-framed messages. (2) Statistical evidence will lead to a more explicit information need than narrative evidence. (3) Message framing and evidence type will interact and (a) for statistical evidence, loss-framed messages will lead to a more favorable intention towards HPV vaccination than gain-framed messages and (b) for narrative evidence, gain-framed messages will lead to a more favorable intention towards HPV vaccination than loss-framed messages. (4) Message framing and evidence type will interact and (a) for loss-framed messages, statistical evidence will stimulate more explicit information need of HPV vaccination than narrative evidence and (b) for gain-framed messages, narrative evidence will stimulate more explicit information need of HPV vaccination than statistical evidence.

Originality/value

This paper can help to further understand the important roles of message framing and evidence type in health behavior promotion. The study contributes to the literature on how health information can be well organized to serve the public health communication and further enhance the health information service.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 73 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2021

Zhengxiang Wu, Tingting Guo and Baoku Li

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of framing idle item recycling appeals as gains or losses on influencing consumers' idle item recycling intention by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of framing idle item recycling appeals as gains or losses on influencing consumers' idle item recycling intention by assessing the mediating role of perceived impact and the moderating role of product attachment.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, three experiments were conducted to gather data. The assumed hypotheses were verified using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and bootstrap analysis.

Findings

Study 1 illustrated that loss-framed messages are more persuasive than gain-framed messages for less-involved consumers in idle item recycling, whereas message framing shows no significant difference in more-involved consumers' intention. Study 2 suggested that perceived impact tends to increase less-involved consumers' recycling intention when the message is framed as loss. Study 3 demonstrated that less-involved consumers would react to idle item recycling messages when they are strongly attached to a product. Further, gain-framed messages are more efficacious than loss-framed messages in influencing more-involved consumers' recycling intention when they are strongly attached to a product.

Originality/value

Previous research focuses on promoting waste recycling behavior initiated by local, city or national governments. This study provides some of the first evidence on the influence mechanism of message framing on consumers' idle item recycling intention and offers insights into companies to develop effective advertising strategies for idle item recycling management.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 33 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2020

David S. Dobson and Karolien Poels

Mortgage lenders often combine a variety of framing strategies when developing mortgage advertisements. To date, these frames have mostly been studied separately. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Mortgage lenders often combine a variety of framing strategies when developing mortgage advertisements. To date, these frames have mostly been studied separately. This paper, however, studies the combined framing effects of message valence, specificity, and temporality on consumers' mortgage decision-making.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methods design was used. First, 13 unique print ads collected from a Canadian newspaper were analyzed for content. Second, a 2 × 2 × 2 scenario-based experiment with 400 undergraduate participants examined the framing effects of valence, specificity and temporality on attitudes toward the mortgage advertising message, the product advertised, and the brand, as well as on consumers' behavioral intentions toward the advertised mortgage product.

Findings

The content analysis suggests that combined framing does exist in print ads. A positive message with a fixed term and a specific interest rate were the most commonly used frames. The experiment revealed that, for behavioral intentions, the main effect of the message temporality was significant. The effects of advertising a long-term mortgage on behavioral intentions were more favorable than those of advertising a short-term mortgage.

Practical implications

This research provides a combined framing model for designing advertising strategies for the financial services industry to market complex financial products, such as mortgage loans to consumers. This is relevant to lenders when designing a persuasive package or ads for potential customers.

Originality/value

This study is the first of its kind to investigate the effects of combinations of message frames on consumers' mortgage decision-making, while also advancing the understanding of message framing theory for the financial services industry.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Eyal Gamliel and Ram Herstein

Price deals are typically presented in “save” terms. However, prospect theory predicts that people will be more willing to waive a monetary gain than to lose the same…

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2622

Abstract

Purpose

Price deals are typically presented in “save” terms. However, prospect theory predicts that people will be more willing to waive a monetary gain than to lose the same amount of money. This study seeks to examine whether consumers would show more purchase intentions of a product offered in a price deal framed negatively (“lose if you don't purchase”) relative to the conventional positive frame (“save if you purchase”).

Design/methodology/approach

The purchase intentions of 189 participants, randomly assigned to either a positively or a negatively framed message, were examined. The participants' perceived monetary gain in the deal and their involvement in the issue were also measured.

Findings

Presented with a negative relative to positive frame, participants showed more purchase intentions of a product offered in a price deal, and perceived their monetary gain as higher. Highly involved and lowly involved participants exhibited similar framing effects.

Research limitations/implications

The findings regarding lowly involved participants are inconsistent with previous findings. Future research is needed to clarify whether the message framing effect interacts with involvement in predicting purchase intentions of a product offered in a price deal.

Practical implications

The theoretical explanation of the phenomenon presented in this study predicts that negative framing of messages will also be more effective in other consumer behaviour contexts.

Originality/value

This study is the first empirical demonstration of the effect of message framing on the effectiveness of price deal offers, suggesting that retailers should re‐examine their conventional presentation of price deal offers in terms of gains, and consider rephrasing them in terms of loss.

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2019

Elizabeth Johnson-Young and Robert G. Magee

The purpose of this paper is to explore the corporate social responsibility (CSR) paradox, when a social campaign hurts the sponsoring brand even while raising concern for…

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1023

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the corporate social responsibility (CSR) paradox, when a social campaign hurts the sponsoring brand even while raising concern for the campaign issue.

Design/methodology/approach

A between-subjects experiment tested the effects of regulatory frames, issue involvement and collective efficacy on brand attitude, attitude toward the campaign messages, and concern for the issue.

Findings

A promotion-oriented frame (vs prevention-oriented frame) produced a more unfavorable brand attitude among consumers who had low levels of collective efficacy, even though the promotion-oriented frame generated strong concern for the issue itself. Attitudes toward the campaign messages remained favorable, suggesting that the negative effect of message frames was directly specifically at the brand.

Originality/value

Using real-world campaign materials demonstrated that a firm’s CSR campaign efforts can create important brand risks.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Courtney Cucchiara, Soyeon Kwon and Sejin Ha

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of different label-message formats (positively vs negatively framed messages) on consumers’ purchase intentions in an…

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1463

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of different label-message formats (positively vs negatively framed messages) on consumers’ purchase intentions in an organic seafood shopping setting, along with the moderating effects of two individual characteristics (purchase-decision involvement and perceived consumer effectiveness (PCE)) on the message-framing performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered from 1,698 consumers of a supermarket chain in the northeast region of the USA using a web-based experiment.

Findings

Results of this study support the superiority of a positively framed message over a negatively framed message in persuading consumers to buy organic food. In addition, this effect of framing on persuasion is contingent upon different levels of consumer purchase-decision involvement as well as PCE concerning organic products.

Practical implications

This study offers managerial implications for marketers and retailers, messages appealing the environmental and health benefits of organic seafood consumption (positively framed arguments) would be more persuasive to increase consumer purchase intention than negatively framed ones. In addition, individual characteristics of their target market should be taken into account in communication design and implementation.

Originality/value

This survey research offers insights into the organic food consumption literature by validating the applicability of message framing in the organic seafood labelling setting and identifying consumers’ individual characteristics (purchase-decision involvement regarding organic seafood and PCE) moderating the message framing effectiveness.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2014

Line Schmeltz

– The purpose of this paper is to test how framing of CSR messages, based on a value-theoretical framework, impacts consumer perception of the CSR message.

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2371

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test how framing of CSR messages, based on a value-theoretical framework, impacts consumer perception of the CSR message.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative study in the form of an online survey strongly inspired by classical experimental design.

Findings

Findings demonstrate that explicit communication of CSR framed as a corporate competence, and to some extent also as something personally relevant to the receivers, positively impacts evaluations of CSR messages and the companies behind them.

Research limitations/implications

Findings indicate that CSR messages could increasingly emphasize corporate competence with a lesser focus on moral ideas and commitments, and that framing strategies can be effective in creating CSR messages that will be positively evaluated by young consumers.

Originality/value

This study contributes by providing new insights into how value-based framing of CSR messages can increase credibility and relevance and thus help facilitate the complicated task of communicating CSR by way of suggesting a new CSR communication strategy framework.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2018

Holly K. Overton

The purpose of this paper is to apply the situational theory of publics and framing theory in the context of environmental corporate social responsibility (CSR…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply the situational theory of publics and framing theory in the context of environmental corporate social responsibility (CSR) communication research to determine how message frames impact information seeking and processing.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a 3 (message frame: diagnostic, prognostic, or motivational) × 2 (environmental issue: general vs specific) plus control between subjects experimental design, the study examines the attitudes, cognitions, and behavioral intentions different publics may form about two different environmental responsibility issues presented in this study. Furthermore, the study aims to examine how different types of message frames (diagnostic, prognostic, or motivational) and topics may impact how a company can move a public toward information seeking behaviors.

Findings

Based on theoretical considerations, structural equation modeling was used to examine significant paths between variables, thus creating a proposed new theoretical model that can be applied to CSR, public relations, and strategic communication literature.

Originality/value

The study offers a proposed new integrated theoretical model that can be applied to strategic communication literature and used to assist companies with enhancing their CSR communication and strategic communication planning efforts to determine how to move a public toward information seeking behaviors.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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