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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

Mervyn Richardson

Reviews some of the chemistry and environmental hazards associatedwith chlorine and bromine compounds when used as water disinfectants inmany industrial processes. Lays…

Abstract

Reviews some of the chemistry and environmental hazards associated with chlorine and bromine compounds when used as water disinfectants in many industrial processes. Lays emphasis on the oxidation of bromide by chlorine to bromate, a suspected genotoxin. A risk assessment of the predicted presence is detailed. In view of the formation of haloforms and other noxious substances derived from chlorine, some of the advantages of the use of chlorine dioxide are detailed. Proposes recommendations for water regulators to consider the inclusion of bromine‐containing substances, and in particular bromate, in forthcoming legislation.

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Environmental Management and Health, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-6163

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Mervyn Richardson, I.M. Trakhtenberg and M.N. Korshun

Summarizes some of the most relevant toxicological aspects from theUNEP/IRPTC′s Scientific Reviews of Soviet Literature on Toxicity andHazards of Chemicals, No. 117…

Abstract

Summarizes some of the most relevant toxicological aspects from the UNEP/IRPTC′s Scientific Reviews of Soviet Literature on Toxicity and Hazards of Chemicals, No. 117 Organomercury compounds, Geneva/Moscow 1990, and outlines their uses and environmental fate and pathways in a number of species and matrices. Of special interest are the toxic effects during pregnancy and to nursing mothers and their offsprings. Effects upon farm animals, foodstuffs, building facrics are indicated, together with recommendations for their prohibition. Their persistence in the environment is stressed.

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Environmental Management and Health, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-6163

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Environmental Management and Health, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-6163

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

Mervyn Richardson

The war in Croatia has caused very significant damage to chemical andallied industries. This damage has inflicted pollution to soils,groundwaters, major rivers used by…

Abstract

The war in Croatia has caused very significant damage to chemical and allied industries. This damage has inflicted pollution to soils, groundwaters, major rivers used by third countries for potable water resources, and the Adriatic sea. Emphasizes some of the major issues and indicates remedial action, monitoring requirements, needs for training and joint venture possibilities.

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Environmental Management and Health, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-6163

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2008

Helen Moore

Interest in the role of the New Zealand School Journal as an officially sanctioned publication for schools, has resulted in a number of past studies exploring its…

Abstract

Interest in the role of the New Zealand School Journal as an officially sanctioned publication for schools, has resulted in a number of past studies exploring its relationship to official curriculum, educational policy and wider socio‐political developments, largely in relation to the written text. This article focuses on selected visual imagery, drawing on a masters study that examined discourses of art and identity through an interdisciplinary approach. Primary sources such as the School Journal publications themselves, material from the National Archives, and the stories of illustrators (gathered through a variety of communications including oral history), contributed a range of voices to the research. This article addresses some of the themes identified in relation to post World War 2 discourses of identity seeking to construct a sense of New Zealandness in educational publications. Acknowledging the role of imagery in educational publication itself offers another voice in constructing our educational history.

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History of Education Review, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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Book part
Publication date: 4 September 2019

Michael Schwartz and Debra R. Comer

This article considers what has happened in the 20 years since REIO was founded. The article argues that in sub-Saharan Africa many of those self-same issues currently…

Abstract

This article considers what has happened in the 20 years since REIO was founded. The article argues that in sub-Saharan Africa many of those self-same issues currently continue to plague Africans, and that these issues urgently need to be addressed if we are going to improve morality in Africa. In exploring these issues, we considered the circumstances which the Victorian novelist, Anthony Trollope (1815–1882), experienced when he lived in Ireland during the Irish famine. Our article argues as to the very similar circumstances which led to the Irish famine and, currently, lead to the recurrent famines in sub-Saharan Africa. Trollope explored both the causes and the ramifications of the Irish famine in his novel Castle Richmond. According to Trollope, many of the effects of the Irish famine could have been averted if those in the community able to help had had the necessary moral willpower to do so. Trollope was an extremely keen fox-hunter and argued as to the communal benefits of fox-hunting. The article also considers a current devotee of fox-hunting, the Oxford philosopher Roger Scruton, and we explore Scruton’s arguments as to the benefits of local communities. We argue that Scruton’s conservative arguments have much in common with that of the renowned communitarian, Michael Sandel. And that if their arguments were seriously considered much of what the Zambian economist Dambisa Moyo fears for her fellow sub-Saharan Africans might be avoided.

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The Next Phase of Business Ethics: Celebrating 20 Years of REIO
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-005-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1946

By the beginning of the war, Germany's over‐all self‐sufficiency in food had reached a level of approximately 83 per cent., on the peace‐time basis of 2,200—2,400 calories…

Abstract

By the beginning of the war, Germany's over‐all self‐sufficiency in food had reached a level of approximately 83 per cent., on the peace‐time basis of 2,200—2,400 calories per person per day. In respect to some types of food, however, the situation was not satisfactory. For example, before the war she produced approximately 73 per cent. of fish requirements, 12 per cent. of corn, 50 per cent. of legumes, and 60 per cent. of fat within her own boundaries. The country could be fed at a reduced level by the produce raised within its own boundaries if food were perfectly controlled and evenly distributed. However, in practice, individual provinces were much less favourably situated in this respect. Western Germany, an area of relatively small and diversified farms, was critically dependent on the eastern provinces for its flour, grain, and potato supplies. It is clear that all German civilians could be fed at a uniform level of adequacy during a war only by control of the country's food supply at the national level and by the continued operation of the new transportation network of the country. For this reason the bombing of rail and inland water transportation facilities became such a serious threat to national uniformity in food distribution. Of the many kinds of centralised food processing industries known in the United States, only a few played an important role in the food supply of German civilians. The principal examples of these were grain milling, sugar production and refining, and the large bakeries of urban areas. The damage or destruction of these facilities, incidental to air attack on other industrial targets, seriously decreased their production capacity. Bombing destroyed the mills for processing 9 per cent. of the German rye output and 35 per cent. of the wheat output. Of the sugar refineries four plants producing 300,000 tons annually, were destroyed. This represents a 38 per cent. decrease in production of sugar. Similarly bombing of chemical plants was largely responsible for the decrease in the supply for fertiliser nitrogen. In 1939, 718,000 tons of fertiliser nitrogen were available, but by 1945 this had decreased to 140,000 tons. The significance of this destruction of facilities vital to the feeding of a country already on a border‐line diet is ominous. Reliable estimates indicate that aerial bombings destroyed 35 per cent. of Germany's total (approximately 460,000 square metres) cold storage capacity. The increased use of cold storage intensified their dependence on transportation and on the continuity of the power supply. Aerial attack, as a result, not only decreased usable cold storage space, but also seriously interfered with the operation of the remaining space by impeding shipments and interrupting sources of power. It was the constantly reiterated opinion of all food officials that the bomb destruction of the transportation network was the largest single factor contributing to the disruption of the food supply. Bulk shipments which had been carried on inland waterways were seriously impeded by the bombing of canals. Aerial attack against railway lines, bridges and terminal facilities caused widespread interruptions in service and destroyed rolling stock, freight en route and handling facilities at terminals. It is not possible at this time to state exactly in what measure the curtailment of the national diet contributed to the ultimate defeat of Germany. The evidence available indicates, however, that it was an important factor. There is in any case no doubt that strategic bombing is the major element contributing to the present shortage of food in Germany. It was not apparent that the Germans considered the vitamin and mineral content of food in determining the ration allowances of the people. Immediately with the beginning of the war, all the principal foods were rationed, so that the lack of recognition of the importance of the vitamin and mineral content of this ration actually was an additional point of vulnerability for the German diet. With a food economy so vulnerable it is not surprising to have found that the basic food rationing programme was abandoned early in 1945 when the destruction of transport and communications by the strategic air offensive attained major proportions. This necessitated falling back on the inadequate system of regional self‐supply. The destruction of large food stocks, processing plants and cold storage plants by bombing also contributed to the general deterioration of the German food supply. There is ample evidence for the conclusion that as a result of the strategic air offensive the nutritional demands for the continued health of the German people could not be met.

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British Food Journal, vol. 48 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

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Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 51 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Man-Eating Monsters
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-528-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1960

MANY who realise the implications of White's book on The Organisation Man have probably closed it with the self‐satisfied reflection that ‘it can't happen here.’ That is…

Abstract

MANY who realise the implications of White's book on The Organisation Man have probably closed it with the self‐satisfied reflection that ‘it can't happen here.’ That is the anodyne we generally swallow to protect us from disagreeable fears.

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Work Study, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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