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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2018

Mervyn Martin

The recent vote for Britain to exit the European Union and the election of Donald Trump as the President of the USA has been described as events that bring an end to…

Abstract

Purpose

The recent vote for Britain to exit the European Union and the election of Donald Trump as the President of the USA has been described as events that bring an end to globalization and indeed seen as a reversal of the globalization process. A possible reason for this is that both choices are thought to be premised on inward-looking objectives rather than having global objectives. This paper aims to offer an opinion that this view is flawed. This is because integration, which is used to approach globalization, is not a one-way process seeking greater levels of integration, but rather a tool to address global challenges, which will involve making choices on the degree of integration that is thought necessary at a particular time. In other words, based on what is perceived as necessary at a given time, selective interconnectivity is used to reflect the level of integration desired. Owing to the degree of global income inequality, a high degree of integration will pose difficulties as a shift in production centres. Further, immigration will bring not only economic but also socio-cultural and political implications in even the economically strongest nations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper considers the definition of integration to justify why there are limits placed on the level of integration. In this regard, when the position of individual components is so unequal, there will be limits put on levels of integration due to economic, socio-cultural, and political concerns.

Findings

Delocalization does not exist. The Brexit vote and President Trump’s Presidential bid success are all part of the globalization process, where from time to time, the levels of integration will slow down. This does not suggest backtracking on globalization.

Research limitations/implications

The discussion and analysis in this paper are significant as they offer an unexplored perspective into current discussions on the Brexit vote and President Trump’s election into office. The discussion and analysis are rigorous in that they are precise and robust in examining the historical evolution to the international trading system to explain why the predominant view on deglobalization is a misunderstanding of the matters that influence globalization and integration.

Practical implications

The paper offers a practical and logical explanation to concerns regarding what is termed as deglobalization by providing an analysis and insight into the current global challenges, in particular income inequality, as an environment within which choices have to be made.

Social implications

In the discussion, subsequent to Trump’s successful bid for US presidency and the Brexit vote, there has been a frenzy in opinions regarding the implications of these milestones. This paper debunks the exaggerations offered by explaining how and why these milestones are nothing new by examining the history of the international trading system.

Originality/value

This paper is original as it offers a fresh perspective on the deglobalization debate. It provides a discussion from the global income inequality perspective to explain why and how important are global challenges upon domestic choices and how this, in turn, relates to globalization and integration.

Details

Journal of International Trade Law and Policy, vol. 17 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-0024

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2011

Mervyn Martin and Maryam Shademan Pajouh

The purpose of the paper is to highlight the lack of fairness in the international trading system, including the HR policies in the WTO which have wider implications on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to highlight the lack of fairness in the international trading system, including the HR policies in the WTO which have wider implications on the participation of developing countries in the multilateral trading system.

Design/methodology/approach

The main research methodology undertaken for this paper is based on the quantitative approach, predominantly from sources such as books, articles and WTO reports.

Findings

There is a correlation between the HR policies employed by the WTO and the usage by developing countries of the WTO DSU.

Practical implications

The implications of the research/paper indicate that discrimination against developing countries in the international system goes beyond their inherent weakness as poorer members of the international order. Such discrimination is deep rooted within the institutional governance of the system.

Social implications

The need to re‐evaluate policies practices by international institutions in the light of the developments of the twenty‐first century.

Originality/value

There has been no work undertaken in relation to the use of language as a criterion for job selection and its implications on the participatory value of developing countries in the WTO DSU.

Details

Journal of International Trade Law and Policy, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-0024

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 23 November 2016

Becky Malby and Murray Anderson-Wallace

Abstract

Details

Networks in Healthcare
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-283-5

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2013

Rebecca Malby, Kieran Mervyn and Luca Pirisi

The largest organisation in the western world, the UK National Health Service (NHS), might be best viewed as a network of interdependent organisations. However, the public…

Abstract

Purpose

The largest organisation in the western world, the UK National Health Service (NHS), might be best viewed as a network of interdependent organisations. However, the public has only recently begun to see it as a living network. Public reforms and financial crises have increased the need for professionals to innovate and improve their role. The overarching question is how this new clinical leadership can positively affect the functioning of the system and its performance. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to clarify how leaders can be most effective in managing health networks.

Design/methodology/approach

A pragmatic approach was taken because of the topical and strategic importance of networks and leadership in the current climate, and hence a need for greater understanding of this largely unknown phenomenon. A focus group interview with Organisational Development experts from the Centre for Innovation and Health Management (CIHM) at Leeds University Business School was followed by three scoping reviews and high-level follow-up conversations with CIHM members, network leaders from the NHS and third sectors.

Findings

Issues that have emerged include: how networks are designed; which factors enhance its likelihood of success and predicate its failure; discussions of illuminating effective leadership.

Research limitations/implications

The Stories of Effective Leadership Networks were provided by the network founders, who may have sought to emphasise the benefits (as opposed to downside) of their network. An ideal scenario would have been the inclusion of patients and carers and perhaps administrative staff to reduce bias.

Originality/value

Considering the limited evidence base from the literature about medical leadership for network management, the involvement of network leaders and the ability to draw-upon CIHMs knowledge and expertise has been fundamental for determining lessons that may enhance the leadership function of the UK's health system network.

Details

The International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 9 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1975

Tom Schultheiss and Linda Mark

The following classified, annotated list of titles is intended to provide reference librarians with a current checklist of new reference books, and is designed to…

Abstract

The following classified, annotated list of titles is intended to provide reference librarians with a current checklist of new reference books, and is designed to supplement the RSR review column, “Recent Reference Books,” by Frances Neel Cheney. “Reference Books in Print” includes all additional books received prior to the inclusion deadline established for this issue. Appearance in this column does not preclude a later review in RSR. Publishers are urged to send a copy of all new reference books directly to RSR as soon as published, for immediate listing in “Reference Books in Print.” Reference books with imprints older than two years will not be included (with the exception of current reprints or older books newly acquired for distribution by another publisher). The column shall also occasionally include library science or other library related publications of other than a reference character.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Abstract

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2008

Arnold Zellner

After briefly reviewing the past history of Bayesian econometrics and Alan Greenspan's (2004) recent description of his use of Bayesian methods in managing policy-making…

Abstract

After briefly reviewing the past history of Bayesian econometrics and Alan Greenspan's (2004) recent description of his use of Bayesian methods in managing policy-making risk, some of the issues and needs that he mentions are discussed and linked to past and present Bayesian econometric research. Then a review of some recent Bayesian econometric research and needs is presented. Finally, some thoughts are presented that relate to the future of Bayesian econometrics.

Details

Bayesian Econometrics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-308-8

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Dandan Ma, Jia Tina Du, Yonghua Cen and Peng Wu

The purpose of this paper is to identify enablers and inhibitors to the adoption of mobile internet services by socioeconomically disadvantaged people: an understudied…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify enablers and inhibitors to the adoption of mobile internet services by socioeconomically disadvantaged people: an understudied population adversely affected by digital inequality.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study combining a questionnaire and semi-structured interviews. In total, 32 socioeconomically disadvantaged people explored mobile lottery services and subsequently were asked a series of semi-structured questions about their perceptions of the technology.

Findings

Users’ attitudes toward mobile internet services were ambivalent. They experienced some advantages of smartphones (including escaping spatiotemporal constrains, fashionableness, privacy, and cost-effectiveness) and conceived of mobile internet services in terms of social advantages (including their ubiquitous nature, fitting in socially and fear of being “left behind”). However, they also experienced barriers and concerns, such as limited mobile data packages, external barriers from mobile services (including security concerns, complex online help tutorials, irrelevant pop-ups, and a lack of personalized services) and internal psychological barriers (including technophobia, self-concept, and habitus).

Research limitations/implications

The findings are of limited generalizability due to the small size of the sample. However, the study has implications for understanding the acceptance of technology among socioeconomically disadvantaged people.

Social implications

The study has social implications for bridging digital inequality in terms of socioeconomic status.

Originality/value

While previous studies have primarily focused on enablers of adopting mobile internet services by active users, this study reveals both the promise of and the barriers to the use of such services by inactive users who comprise an under-served population.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 68 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 February 2020

Marylyn Carrigan, Solon Magrizos, Jordon Lazell and Ioannis Kostopoulos

This article addresses the lack of scholarly attention paid to the sharing economy from a sociological perspective, with respect to the technology-mediated interactions…

Abstract

Purpose

This article addresses the lack of scholarly attention paid to the sharing economy from a sociological perspective, with respect to the technology-mediated interactions between sharing economy users. The paper provides a critical overview of the sharing economy and its impact on business and communities and explores how information technology can facilitate authentic, genuine sharing through exercising and enabling conviviality and non-direct reciprocity.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper begins with a critique of the technology-mediated sharing economy, introduces the concept of conviviality as a tool to grow and shape community and sustainability within the sharing economy and then explores reciprocity and sharing behaviour. Finally, the paper draws upon social exchange theory to illustrate conviviality and reciprocity, using four case studies of technology-enabled sharing.

Findings

The paper contributes to the emerging debate around how the sharing economy, driven by information systems and technology, affects social cohesion and personal relationships. The paper elucidates the central role conviviality and reciprocity play in explaining the paradoxes, tensions and impact of the sharing economy on society. Conviviality and reciprocity are positioned as key capabilities of a more sustainable version of the sharing economy, enabled via information technology.

Originality/value

The findings reveal that information technology-mediated sharing enterprises should promote conviviality and reciprocity in order to deliver more positive environmental, economic and social benefits. The diversity of existing operations indicated by the findings and the controversies discussed will guide the critical study of the social potential of sharing economy to avoid treating all sharing alike.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2012

Mervyn Eastman

This paper aims to examine the role that the co‐operative sector can play in responding to the needs and aspirations of older people. In addition, through recounting the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the role that the co‐operative sector can play in responding to the needs and aspirations of older people. In addition, through recounting the Change AGEnts co‐operative journey, it seeks to demonstrate that co‐operative principles have the potential to reconfigure services and change the existing negative narrative on which much public sector commissioning and provision is based.

Design/methodology/approach

Change AGEnts is the legacy organisation that came out of the Better Government for Older People's Programme (BGOP), 1998‐2009. The journey from a government sponsored initiative (Cabinet Office) to an independent co‐operative illustrates the opportunities and challenges inherent in taking forward the coalition's present policy intentions of promoting co‐ownership of services, localism and building co‐operative communities.

Findings

Co‐operative approaches empower both professional and older people, through common ownership and mutuality. The experience of forming a co‐operative and becoming part of the co‐operative movement, has the potential to completely change the relationship between older people and the state.

Originality/value

The paper illustrates that deliberation and dialogue has a powerful part to play within the co‐operative movement, through increasing the control of older people in policy and practice outcomes.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

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