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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2013

Mervyn Eastman

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Working with Older People, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Claudine McCreadie

Launched in the spring, No Secrets, the government's latest adult protection guidance is expected to have a major impact on all agencies involved and interested in adult…

Abstract

Launched in the spring, No Secrets, the government's latest adult protection guidance is expected to have a major impact on all agencies involved and interested in adult abuse. Here, using a novel approach, Claudine McCreadie, one of the country's leading elder abuse researchers, looks at what No Secrets will involve for those charged with its implementation in local areas, while providing a range of useful insights and hints.

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The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2012

Mervyn Eastman

This paper aims to examine the role that the co‐operative sector can play in responding to the needs and aspirations of older people. In addition, through recounting the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the role that the co‐operative sector can play in responding to the needs and aspirations of older people. In addition, through recounting the Change AGEnts co‐operative journey, it seeks to demonstrate that co‐operative principles have the potential to reconfigure services and change the existing negative narrative on which much public sector commissioning and provision is based.

Design/methodology/approach

Change AGEnts is the legacy organisation that came out of the Better Government for Older People's Programme (BGOP), 1998‐2009. The journey from a government sponsored initiative (Cabinet Office) to an independent co‐operative illustrates the opportunities and challenges inherent in taking forward the coalition's present policy intentions of promoting co‐ownership of services, localism and building co‐operative communities.

Findings

Co‐operative approaches empower both professional and older people, through common ownership and mutuality. The experience of forming a co‐operative and becoming part of the co‐operative movement, has the potential to completely change the relationship between older people and the state.

Originality/value

The paper illustrates that deliberation and dialogue has a powerful part to play within the co‐operative movement, through increasing the control of older people in policy and practice outcomes.

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Working with Older People, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2012

Deborah Klee

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Working with Older People, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Azrini Wahidin and Jason Powell

Drawing from Foucault’s methodological terms of archaeology and genealogy this article critically engages with understanding the inter‐relationship between old age and…

Abstract

Drawing from Foucault’s methodological terms of archaeology and genealogy this article critically engages with understanding the inter‐relationship between old age and prison life.We draw out the relevance of a Foucauldian paradigm for investigating how penal discourses and actual prisoners experiences exemplify issues of power, knowledge and surveillance in institutional settings. We draw out how violence impinges on the lives of older people in prisons by pointing out the implications of such experiences for both a critical ontology and epistemology of ageing. It is by transgressing the boundaries of the conventional understanding of the prison and by casting a critical gaze that will gain greater understanding of how elder abuse in secure settings goes unregulated.

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International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 24 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Mariette Glover

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The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Lorna Easterbrook

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Working with Older People, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2010

Robin Cowen

The social care needs of older prisoners is a neglected area. Social care policy and guidance does not exclude them but rarely mentions them explicitly; consequently their…

Abstract

The social care needs of older prisoners is a neglected area. Social care policy and guidance does not exclude them but rarely mentions them explicitly; consequently their needs may be unmet. At the same time, more people are being sentenced and prisoners aged over 60 are the fastest growing group. Equally, older prisoners are rarely subject to the same safeguarding processes that take place in the community. This paper considers both issues and suggests some ways forward.

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Working with Older People, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2009

June Kathchild

Low self‐esteem and confidence can make someone feel cut off from society and, as Toby Williamson explained, social exclusion can lead to depression and other mental…

Abstract

Low self‐esteem and confidence can make someone feel cut off from society and, as Toby Williamson explained, social exclusion can lead to depression and other mental illnesses. Here, June Kathchild explains about the Ransackers project, which has created a growing range of opportunities for older people to study (for the first time), giving the students a renewed zest for life.

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Working with Older People, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1955

There now appears to be a real prospect that the present chaos will give place to a well‐ordered set of enactments. In the House of Lords there has been introduced by the…

Abstract

There now appears to be a real prospect that the present chaos will give place to a well‐ordered set of enactments. In the House of Lords there has been introduced by the Lord Chancellor a Food and Drugs Bill, which is a purely consolidating measure of 137 clauses and twelve schedules, designed to replace virtually all existing Food and Drugs statutes dealing with England, Wales and Northern Ireland (without amending their substance), and in particular to repeal wholly the Food and Drugs Act, 1954. In the House of Commons the Food and Drugs (Scotland) Bill, which is both an amending and consolidating measure—has for the third time been launched on its Parliamentary career. Meanwhile, much progress as been made with the preparation of the promised Regulations, which, before this note appears in print, will have received some consideration from the Food Hygiene Advisory Council. And, simultaneously, the contemplated revision and enlargement of Codes of Practice appear to be near completion. We know of no reason why all these operations should not be completed before the end of the present year. One of the important matters to be settled is the way in which the Minister of Health will exercise his discretionary powers in relation to the local governing bodies which will be Food and Drugs Authorities.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 57 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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