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Case study

Sridhar Vaithianathan and Karthikeya P. Bolar

Business/technology strategy. The purpose of the case is to enable the students to understand the following: how technology implementation can change the face of business…

Abstract

Subject area

Business/technology strategy. The purpose of the case is to enable the students to understand the following: how technology implementation can change the face of business like cab service? How information technology deployment can influence competition? How investment in company's IT infrastructure affects the bottom line?

Study level/applicability

The case can be discussed at Master of Business Administration (MBA)/Post Graduate Diploma in Business Administration (PGDBA) level students as well as executive education program. It is aimed at graduate level and postgraduate level management courses such as management information systems, strategic information systems, and technology management.

Case overview

Meru Cabs, started in April 2007 at Mumbai, was one of the firsts to provide “radio taxi” service in India. Meru Cabs delivers a reliable taxi service by concentrating on three C's, namely customer, call centre and chauffeur. Much of its growth can be attributed to successful deployment of the technology. This case presents the growth of Meru Cabs and how it has differentiated itself by utilizing the technology to attain market leader position in the four cities – Mumbai, Delhi, Hyderabad and Bangalore, where it operates. Also the case discusses about the future of cab service in general and what it has in store for Meru Cabs. With the flurry of cabs service coming up in every city and the competition getting intense, the case put forth the opportunities and challenges existing for cab companies in general and Meru Cabs in particular.

Expected learning outcomes

To enable the students to understand that technology is a strategic tool: to enhance customer relationship, to manage business operations, to achieve sustained competitive advantage and that forms an integral part of company's growth and/or expansion strategy.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 3 no. 7
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Case study

Roy Debjit

The market share of Chartered Cabs is affected by new entrants in Ahmedabad. In addition, their operational costs are soaring due to excessive dry run costs. Due to…

Abstract

The market share of Chartered Cabs is affected by new entrants in Ahmedabad. In addition, their operational costs are soaring due to excessive dry run costs. Due to immense competition, Chartered needs to focus on high service quality delivery and also minimize its operational costs. This case will allow the participants to understand the operational complexities of a cab service provider and also arrive at alternate strategies to minimize costs.

Details

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2633-3260
Published by: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

Keywords

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Case study

G Raghuram and Darshit Jasani

This case describes the events following an incident of a rape in a taxi associated with Uber, by its driver. Uber was an application based taxi operator. The events…

Abstract

This case describes the events following an incident of a rape in a taxi associated with Uber, by its driver. Uber was an application based taxi operator. The events raised several issues for government systems and processes, such as need for regulation of new formats of business like application based taxi services, integrated databases, checks against forgery and holistic approach towards women safety. The case also brings out how an e-commerce business raises regulatory concerns.

Details

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2633-3260
Published by: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

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Case study

Rajeev Verma, Anuj Sharma and Jyoti Verma

The learning outcome is that it will help to sustain your startups in the ever-changing business environment especially in the context of emerging markets.

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The learning outcome is that it will help to sustain your startups in the ever-changing business environment especially in the context of emerging markets.

Case overview/synopsis

The present case is about Dilkhush Kumar from village Bangaon, India who developed a cab booking platform “AryaGo”, an innovative platform completely dedicated for rural road transport connectivity. AryaGo is the service line of Aryan Cabs and Rural Trans-solution Pvt. Ltd., a Startup founded in the year 2016 under Startup Bihar, a seed capital support scheme of State Government. The idea was to provide comfort, convenience, safety and affordability to all the commuters travelling from or within far-off villages. The biggest challenge during implementation in villages includes availability of updated geo-mapped images for app development and vehicle tracking. Company was foremost in providing the kiosk-based booking facility for its customers. It took the decision based on the profiling of customers and their preferred booking methods. When a customer booked a cab using IVR, they did not had access to app-based customer panel and hence they could not avail services such as, location tracking, SoS, real time tracking of vehicle. However, heavy invest in IT has put the company in financial stress and Kumar is wondering whether to expand fast or penetrate in the given target market. Should he re-design his business model so as it can really make a difference in terms of service delivery?

Complexity academic level

Post Graduate/ MBA.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 8: Marketing

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Article

Natasha Saqib and Mir Shahid Satar

Emerging markets are witnessing rapid changes in their economy owing to the ongoing liberalization and globalization. India, as one of the emerging markets in south Asia…

Abstract

Purpose

Emerging markets are witnessing rapid changes in their economy owing to the ongoing liberalization and globalization. India, as one of the emerging markets in south Asia, is also experiencing a dramatic change in its business ecosystem. This poses huge opportunities to the companies, both start-ups and established ones. In this direction, the business model innovation offers a strategic renewal mechanism. The study aims to explore the practices of an online transport network company (OLA) creating a distinctive place for itself in Indian taxi service sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Methodologically, an exploratory case study of an India-based online transport company (OLA) business model innovation is reported.

Findings

This paper reveals that OLA has been able to gain competitive advantage in the Indian emerging market by developing an innovative business model with its distinctive features of personalised customer service, asset sharing, usage-based pricing, collaborative ecosystem, agile and adaptive organising and successful expansion strategies.

Research limitations/implications

This study adds to current knowledge concerning the theoretical foundations and antecedents of business model innovation as a competitive advantage. The paper is explorative in nature because the analysis is mostly based on literature review. Furthermore, in consideration of the analysis of business model of a single company, further research is required to generalize the results.

Practical implications

The understanding of the intricacies of business model innovation can be of great concern to existing and prospective managers and entrepreneurs of emerging markets.

Originality/value

The paper discusses the features of innovative business models and how firms can make their business models more relevant to the competitive markets. As such, the study is hopeful to aid practitioners engaged in the pursuit of beating the competition with innovation driven business models.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

Keywords

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Article

Tejas R. Shah and Tejal T. Shah

The purpose of the study is to explore and analyze m-car rental service quality dimensions.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to explore and analyze m-car rental service quality dimensions.

Design/methodology/approach

Exploratory factor analysis method is applied to explore the m-car rental service quality dimensions. Further, confirmatory factor analysis is done to prove the reliability and validity of the factors using AMOS 22.0.

Findings

The results reveal the m-car rental service quality dimensions: ambient quality, technical quality, comfort, safety and employee service, mobile convenience, mobile responsiveness, mobile efficiency and reliability and mobile safety and billing.

Research limitations/implications

The explored dimensions of car rental services are in Indian environment. So, these dimensions can be further validated in other similar cultural context.

Practical implications

The proposed measurements can also be applied to measure and compare the service quality performance of car rental firms.

Originality/value

Current literature does not confirm the stable factor structure of m-car rental service quality. This study confirms the reliable and valid dimensions of care rental service through mobile app.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

Keywords

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Case study

Mini Mathur and Smita P. Kothari

Help students understand Porter’s five forces framework. Explore and analyze possible growth strategies using the Ansoff matrix.

Abstract

Learning outcomes

Help students understand Porter’s five forces framework. Explore and analyze possible growth strategies using the Ansoff matrix.

Case overview/synopsis

This case study integrates lessons in growth strategies, Porter’s five forces and the Ansoff matrix. Vijay Kothari, Founder of Wealth out of Waste (WOW) is in a fix. In spite of functioning in an environment of abundant demand and potential, he is unable to perform in his optimum capacity because of operational and manpower-related issues. WOW, which turned nine in 2019, is a sort of monopoly in the organized business of scheduled collection of recyclable trash. WOW is operating in a 2% market with 98% being captured by traditional “pastiwalas.” From the current waiting period of up to seven days, Kothari wants to service any area in the city of Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India within 2 h. To achieve this objective, how should Kothari overcome the growth challenge in the business.

Complexity academic level

Undergraduate and postgraduate.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 11: Strategy.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Article

Rafiq Dossani

Developing economies that are subject to global influences, such as through exposure to global product, labor and capital markets, may be expected to practice higher…

Abstract

Purpose

Developing economies that are subject to global influences, such as through exposure to global product, labor and capital markets, may be expected to practice higher standards of corporate governance (CG) than less globalized developing economies. This paper seeks to understand the relationship between CG and firm ownership by private equity investors in India, and to understand whether CG practices in particular national institutional contexts change when the firm is exposed to investors with a background in other countries' institutional contexts. Taking India as a test case, the paper aims to explore how CG standards are affected by private equity investment that originates from developed countries.

Design/methodology/approach

A primary survey on Indian firms' CG practices for firms that receive private equity and for comparable firms that do not was used to determine differences in CG. Private equity investors were surveyed to determine their national institutional contexts. The CG practices were then related to the national institutional context that the private equity investors came from.

Findings

Private‐equity funded firms display higher standards of corporate governance than firms that do not receive such funding. The difference arises from the application of developed country standards of CG arising from the investors that own the private equity funds. These funds are primarily owned by developed country investors. The strategies through which these occur are: reconstituting the board of directors, influencing senior executive recruitment, and changing the firm's operating and strategic rules.

Originality/value

Developing countries like India usually display low standards of CG. Such standards tend to evolve slowly in line with the country's stage of development. The literature has not hitherto identified ways in which this process can be hastened. This study finds that standards can be raised above the prevailing standards through the governance practices imported into developing countries by private equity funds that are primarily owned by developed country investors. Hence, the findings of this paper contribute to the understanding of how globalization influences CG.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

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Case study

Nidhi Maheshwari

The case is written for MBA or senior undergraduate courses on communication global strategy, leadership or strategy implementation.

Abstract

Subject area

The case is written for MBA or senior undergraduate courses on communication global strategy, leadership or strategy implementation.

Study level/applicability

The case is written for MBA or senior undergraduate courses on communication global strategy, leadership or strategy implementation. The case can be taught towards the end of a communications course to learn about crisis communications and the importance of understanding the local institutional and socio-political contexts, including the media during a crisis. For a strategy implementation class, this case can be used in the segment focusing on action and leadership.

Case overview

An extremely difficult situation arose for Uber Cab, a US-based company operating in India, on December 8, 2014, when its taxi services were banned by the Delhi government due to growing anger over the suspected rape of a 27-year-old female executive by one of its drivers. Uber Cab claims that it offers the “safest rides on the road”, but this episode proved otherwise, as the accused was identified as a repeat offender. Initial interrogation by the police highlighted the negligence of the company regarding background checks and police verification while recruiting driver partners. The police further revealed that the driver did not have a Delhi Transport Authority-issued license. Furthermore, the company was not able to provide a call log to police, as such information was said to be gathered at the company’s headquarters in New York. To handle this situation, Uber Cab suspended its operations until the company could apply for a fresh registration and trade license. What was the significance of this incident to a brand like Uber Cab? Could its effect on the regulation of taxi services have been anticipated? How and when should the brand have reacted? Looking forward, what contingency planning would be appropriate? Should brand management, customer service management or the human resources department have been held accountable, or did the responsibility lie elsewhere in the organization?

Expected learning outcomes

The expected learning outcomes are as follows: to understand how institutional differences can create unintended consequences for an multinational enterprise working in an emerging market (early-stage institutions); to understand the critical role of a country manager in mobilizing the local organization and the headquarters to respond to a crisis; also, the role of the headquarters to provide flexibility and support to the local executive; and to understand the inevitable role of the local press in an organizational crisis, and the need for business leaders to deal with the press effectively.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 6: Human Resource Management.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Article

Carrie Waterman, Austin Peterson, Celina Schelle, Steven A. Vosti and Stepha McMullin

Moringa (Moringa oleifera) is a highly nutritious, fast-growing crop that has emerged in Western markets as a “superfood” and as a “smart crop” for income generation…

Abstract

Purpose

Moringa (Moringa oleifera) is a highly nutritious, fast-growing crop that has emerged in Western markets as a “superfood” and as a “smart crop” for income generation potential among small-scale farmers. As such, moringa has been widely promoted by agricultural development practitioners in low-income countries and by emerging businesses aimed at achieving nutritional and social impact. However, the intrinsic nutritional and agronomic strengths of moringa are not enough to warrant its widespread promotion without first evaluating its economic potential to farmers.

Design/methodology/approach

A Land Use System (LUS) analysis modeling tool was employed to test the economic performance of two sets of moringa production practices in Kenya. Data were collected during in-depth interviews and field visits with farmers in Meru that supply a local market, and in Shimba Hills that supply an organic export market.

Findings

Results suggest that current production practices over an 12-years assessment period generate a Net Present Value (NPV) of US$8,049 [ha-1] in Meru and a negative NPV of US$697 [ha-1] in Shimba Hills; with average daily returns to family labor of these two production systems of roughly 1.6 times and 0.13 times the prevailing local wage rate, respectively. These differences were attributed to a higher farmgate prices and greater yields in Meru. The analysis tool was then used to predict the effects of changes in farming practices, e.g. if farmers in Meru switched to intensive bed cultivation NPV is estimated to increase by ∼650%.

Research limitations/implications

This study demonstrates the importance of examining the economic performance of agricultural production systems intended to increase the benefits to small-scale farmers.

Originality/value

Our study is the first to assess moringa's economic performance within two production systems in Kenya – a local farmers' cooperative in Meru, and a group of farmers contracted by an export company.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

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