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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Qin Yao and Eric C. Schwarz

The case of the Mercedes-Benz Arena in Shanghai, China raises an important issue with respect to transnational venue management corporations embedding and operating in…

Abstract

Purpose

The case of the Mercedes-Benz Arena in Shanghai, China raises an important issue with respect to transnational venue management corporations embedding and operating in foreign markets. The purpose of this paper is to examine how Anschutz Entertainment Group (AEG) has implemented social embeddedness strategy to influence the management structure and enhance operational performance of the Mercedes-Benz Arena.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach was chosen to examine the social embeddedness of AEG through the Mercedes-Benz Arena in Shanghai. An in-depth interview was conducted with John Cappo, the President and CEO of AEG China, in April 2016. In addition, the relative news and interviews of leaders from AEG and AEG China over the past ten years was also collected. Qualitative content analysis of the data was conducted through a coding approach. All the materials were coded into three main categories based on three aspects of social embeddedness: local stakeholder relations, reputation and trust-building, cultural and institutional adaptation.

Findings

AEG has demonstrated how a transnational venue management corporation can successfully integrate social embeddedness strategy with the management structure and operational procedures of the Mercedes-Benz Arena in three ways. First is through the relationship between AEG and its partners in the joint venture, OPG in terms of the enforcement of the contract, the clear division of responsibilities, and the mutual understanding and use of relationship building. Second is the relationship between AEG and the local government in Shanghai. Third was adapting the structures of AEG to fit within local culture and institutional contexts.

Originality/value

The unique multi-stakeholder relationship inherent to venue management in China raises important questions with respect to transnational venue management corporations operating in foreign markets. The adaptation to the local context, as a moderating factor to the institutional exposure of a venue management company involves more challenging obstacles for non-local firms, compared to firms which are familiar with their institutional context. Understanding the key solutions in building relationships and trust with partners in joint venture and local government, as well as the key methods to adopt in local contexts, have applications across any number of sport industries.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Heike Puchan

The launch of the Mercedes‐Benz A‐class in 1997 was greeted with enthusiasm by the international motoring community until the Swedish “elk‐test” was performed. A spate of…

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5365

Abstract

The launch of the Mercedes‐Benz A‐class in 1997 was greeted with enthusiasm by the international motoring community until the Swedish “elk‐test” was performed. A spate of toppling cars was not how Mercedes‐Benz had pictured the launch of their new, safe supermini. Early public relations activity only succeeded in exacerbating the crisis. This case study highlights the mistakes made in the initial stages of the crisis, before examining the strategy employed by Mercedes‐Benz to recover the situation. This article concludes that a more open, honest and proactive approach to crisis communication might have saved Mercedes‐Benz a great deal of money and embarrassment.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Pavel Štrach and André M. Everett

The purpose of this research is to explore the practical implications of brand management decisions, particularly those involving the combination of luxury and mass‐market…

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18273

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to explore the practical implications of brand management decisions, particularly those involving the combination of luxury and mass‐market brands within the same organization through merger or acquisition. The aim of the paper is to expand brand theory by linking it to administrative heritage in the context of the increasingly integrated global automobile industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Integrated case studies of Jaguar, Mercedes‐Benz, and Saab illustrate the effects of brand extension and dilution through the lenses of brand development, luxury brands, and administrative heritage theories. The recent history of acquisitions and mergers involving luxury automobile brands provides background to the in‐depth examination of these three specific instances. Conclusions are reached by comparing and contrasting the experiences of these firms relative to their mass‐market siblings.

Findings

The blending of luxury and mass‐market automobile brands in one corporate portfolio engages advantages of scale and scope economies, but induces potentially fatal brand corrosion. Consumer perceptions of luxury brands are influenced by the degree of commonality with the associated mass‐market brands, independent of whether the luxury brand or the mass‐market brand is the dominant corporate vehicle.

Originality/value

The paper provides insights useful to practitioners as well as academic researchers. The novel juxtapositioning of the concepts of luxury brands, administrative heritage, and global strategic management through mergers/acquisitions demonstrates the unintended consequences of complex interactions in a dynamic industry. The paper concludes with suggestions for further research.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Rogelio Puente-Díaz

The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, the author examines how the destination brand Mexico is using international sporting events as part of its branding strategy…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, the author examines how the destination brand Mexico is using international sporting events as part of its branding strategy to deal with the challenges faced by destinations and to overcome some of its weaknesses. Second, the author assesses the positive and negative consequences of such strategy. The investigation tries to fill a gap in terms of understanding and assessing opportunities and challenges experienced by the sport industry in emerging markets.

Design/methodology/approach

The author used a case study research strategy, relying on documentation, archival records, and personal interviews with experts as sources of evidence. Given that most research efforts have focused on developed countries, this research approach was exploratory and descriptive.

Findings

The thematic analysis revealed the presence of five major themes related to the process of hosting and using Formula One (F1), National Football League (NFL), Major League Baseball (MLB), and National Basketball Association (NBA) games as part of a brand strategy. These five major themes were labeled: brand strategy challenges and opportunities, balancing short- and long-term goals and benefits, tension between stakeholders from different destinations, social issues, and areas of improvement.

Originality/value

The findings shed light on the challenges and opportunities that hosting international sport events bring to a destination brand with an emerging economy such as Mexico. The opportunity to host these types of events comes from the expansion strategies of well-known sport brands such as F1, NFL, MLB, and NBA.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2007

Jian Wang and Zhiying Wang

This paper aims to illustrate the concept of “consumer nationalism” and its implications for corporate reputation management in China.

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1567

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to illustrate the concept of “consumer nationalism” and its implications for corporate reputation management in China.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discusses three incidents involving companies from different countries of origin as cases in point to explore Chinese consumers' infusion of national identity into the public discourse concerning multinational businesses in the Chinese market.

Findings

It is demonstrated that the emotional power of nationalism is a critical component of the political marketplace in contemporary China and at times becomes central to Chinese consumers' relationship with global brands. Consumer nationalism controversies put the involved companies and brands in the spotlight of confrontation with local citizenry. The salience of consumer national advocacy underscores the tensions and contradictions in China's encounter with globalization.

Research limitations/implications

Conceptually, this paper presents evidence for the necessity to take into account nationalism in understanding contemporary Chinese consumer behavior.

Practical implications

The paper discusses lessons learned through the cases and make three general recommendations on communication strategies for managing consumer nationalism in the Chinese market.

Originality/value of paper

The paper locates the conceptual home for the social phenomenon of national advocacy in the process of consumption and its implications for corporate reputation management.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2008

Chor‐Beng Anthony Liew

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the concept of strategic integration of knowledge management (KM ) and customer relationship management (CRM). The integration is

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10207

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the concept of strategic integration of knowledge management (KM ) and customer relationship management (CRM). The integration is a strategic issue that has strong ramifications in the long‐term competitiveness of organizations. It is not limited to CRM; the concept can also be applied to supply chain management (SCM), product development management (PDM), eterprise resource planning (ERP) and retail network management (RNM) that offer different perspectives into knowledge management adoption.

Design/methodology/approach

Through literature review and establishing new perspectives with examples, the components of knowledge management, customer relationship management, and strategic planning are amalgamated.

Findings

Findings include crucial details in the various components of knowledge management, customer relationship management, and strategic planning, i.e. strategic planning process, value formula, intellectual capital measure, different levels of CRM and their core competencies.

Practical implications

Although the strategic integration of knowledge management and customer relationship management is highly conceptual, a case example has been provided where the concept is applied. The same concept could also be applied to other industries that focus on customer service.

Originality/value

The concept of strategic integration of knowledge management and customer relationship management is new. There are other areas, yet to be explored in terms of additional integration such as SCM, PDM, ERP, and RNM. The concept of integration would be useful for future research as well as for KM and CRM practitioners.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1986

Steve Linstead and Keith Turner

Arts sponsorship is very much a Cinderella sister of sports sponsorship. The amounts involved are vastly different, media exposure is much smaller and advertising…

Abstract

Arts sponsorship is very much a Cinderella sister of sports sponsorship. The amounts involved are vastly different, media exposure is much smaller and advertising opportunities are less. Major objectives of arts sponsors are promotion of the corporate image, enhancement of community relations, and, to a certain degree, the promotion of brand awareness. An in‐depth case study by Middlesex Business School of the Peterborough Festival of Country Music revealed four main types of sponsors. Sponsorship was identified as coming together in a field of flux rather than a strict matching. Characteristics of both the Company and Event were identified which were influential in determining the process of sponsorship. When identified, these characteristics enable an accurate picture of the sponsorship relationship to be drawn. With this in focus, wider issues of control and policy, social influences and ideology in relation to cultural issues may be considered.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Heinz Weihrich

This article will describe a logical and efficient process of developing coherent national strategies in light of environmental forces that are present in the global…

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16113

Abstract

This article will describe a logical and efficient process of developing coherent national strategies in light of environmental forces that are present in the global market. It will then apply that process to the Federal Republic of Germany. The TOWS (threats, opportunities, weaknesses, strengths) Matrix will be used to accomplish this task. The TOWS methodology will focus on aspects of German industries that have had a significant impact ‐ either positively or negatively ‐ on the country’s economy and its position in the European Community and the world. Intrinsic national forces in the social, economic, political, and technological areas will be considered in determining the origin of Germany’s national industrial strengths and weaknesses. External opportunities for and threats to these industries will then be analyzed. After an analysis of a wide array of forces, strategies by German industries will be delineated and alternative industrial strategies will be proposed. Because former West Germany differs very much from former East Germany, the analysis will focus on what used to be called “West Germany”, referred to in this paper simply as Germany.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 99 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1999

Henning Dransfeld, Gabriel Jacobs and William Dowsland

During the last two years, the first experiments in digital interactive TV have been carried out, and full digital services are due to become available in many European…

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1682

Abstract

During the last two years, the first experiments in digital interactive TV have been carried out, and full digital services are due to become available in many European states and elsewhere in the world within the next few years. These services will create a range of novel marketing opportunities, and Formula One Grand Prix would appear to offer significant potential in this respect. This paper reviews recent developments in the digital TV marketplace, focuses on how these may impact on Formula One, and suggests that production‐car manufacturers who also supply engines for the sport should now seriously consider taking advantage of the emerging medium.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 99 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2014

Gaurav Bhalla

The article explains how innovating with customers and other stakeholders to achieve co-creation of value requires companies to marry their collaborators' interests with

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2095

Abstract

Purpose

The article explains how innovating with customers and other stakeholders to achieve co-creation of value requires companies to marry their collaborators' interests with corporate knowledge and resources. The process starts with setting objectives and proceeds through four additional steps: selection of arenas, engagement with collaborators, choice of project tools and processes and defining contracts with stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors describe how leading firms have developed best-practice processes, tools and technologies to better enable and expedite value co-creation.

Findings

The article offers managers guidelines for deciding which customers to select for participation in specific co-creation programs. The choices are: Customers who have extraordinary passion for their brands; customers in attractive or untapped market segments; customers that exhibit a high co-creation potential; innovators and early adopters; lead users looking to develop solutions to solve their own needs.

Practical implications

Collaborative innovation projects need to define “What's in it for the collaborators?” Customer collaboration rarely operates independent of incentives.

Originality/value

The article offers practical guidance for companies that engage in co-creation projects because they want to them to foster the discovery of customer interest and value, which they can turn into innovation and competitive advantage.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 42 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

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