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Article

Tina Salter and Judie M Gannon

The purpose of this paper is to examine where and how coaching and mentoring disciplines overlap or differ in approach. Coaching and mentoring have emerged as important…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine where and how coaching and mentoring disciplines overlap or differ in approach. Coaching and mentoring have emerged as important interventions as the role of helping relationships have gained prominence in human resource development. However, there appear to be contexts where one or other is preeminent, without consistent explanation of their suitability. Such inconsistency arguably creates confusion and doubt about these interventions and their efficacy notably amongst those who commission such interventions and their potential beneficiaries. This study focuses on this inconsistency of coaching or mentoring by exploring practitioners’ approaches within six disciplines: executive coaches, coaching psychologists, sports coaches, mentors of leaders, mentors of newly qualified teachers and mentors of young people, with the aim of assisting those seeking support with development.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory study was undertaken using a qualitative methodology, where in-depth interviews were completed with experienced practitioners to elucidate their approaches and practice.

Findings

The findings show that approaches may be discipline-specific, where practitioners specialise in a particular type of coaching or mentoring requiring distinctive knowledge and/or skills. However, the sharing of good practice across disciplines and the value of understanding the common dimensions which emerged is also evident, providing clients and those who commission coaching and mentoring with reassurances regarding the nature of these helping relationships.

Research limitations/implications

As the research focused only on the practitioners’ experiences of their work in these disciplines, it is vital that the mentees’ and coachees’ experiences are captured in future research. There is also value in further exploration of the model developed.

Practical implications

By deploying the model concerned with the future development of these interventions suggests practitioners can expand their capacity and scope by adopting interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approaches.

Originality/value

By directly exploring the shared and distinctive approaches of coaching and mentoring practitioners in six contexts, this study provides opportunities to understand where practitioners can benefit from imparting best practice across these interventions and highlighting specific aspects for their context.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

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Article

Iris Snoeck and Elke Struyf

The aim of this study is to analyse the experiences of student teachers and mentors regarding in‐service teacher‐training or the “Learning in the Workplace Trajectory”…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to analyse the experiences of student teachers and mentors regarding in‐service teacher‐training or the “Learning in the Workplace Trajectory” (LIW) in Flemish secondary schools. How is this trajectory perceived by mentors and student teachers, i.e. do their individual expectations and capacities match with the formal guidelines implemented by the teacher‐training institutes (and how)?

Design/methodology/approach

This study investigates the LIW trajectory on a pragmatic level, using qualitative research methods such as semi‐structured interviews. The focus of this study is twofold: coaching during the LIW trajectory and evaluation during and at the end of the LIW trajectory.

Findings

The majority of the respondents (mentors and student teachers) indicated that adequate communication and partnership between school and teacher‐training institute (on both organizational and individual level) is essential for a successful trajectory. The challenges which both organizations have to face in order to establish an effective partnership and to effectively guide future student teachers towards their future profession, were made transparent: invest in intensive coaching and install structural involvement of both school and institute during the trajectory.

Research limitations/implications

This study was limited to a qualitative methodology and therefore has very few universal implications. Furthermore, this study originated from a practical point‐of‐view, with no interest in finding new theoretical insights on workplace learning.

Social implications

This study shows that without sufficient financial and structural support from the government, schools and teacher‐training institutes are left facing the challenges (finding ways to invest in and increase coaching the LIW student teachers and structural involvement in the organization of the LIW trajectory of schools) on their own.

Originality/value

This study aimed to highlight the perspective of student teachers and mentors – in other words to see this “Learning in the Workplace Trajectory” through their experience, as they experience(d) it in order to get a look inside the daily practice of both LIW students and mentors during coaching and evaluation.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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Article

Tina Salter

The purpose of this paper is to explore why mentoring is preferred over coaching when supporting pre-service teachers, compared with other stages in a teacher’s career…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore why mentoring is preferred over coaching when supporting pre-service teachers, compared with other stages in a teacher’s career where coaching is more readily available.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper first draws upon pre-existing literature which addresses the ways in which mentoring is used for pre-service teachers; followed by a discussion of the place and use of coaching within education. It then focuses on data generated from interviews with senior teachers responsible for the induction of pre-service teachers within three UK-based secondary schools and compares this to findings about mentor and coach approaches used in other sectors or contexts.

Findings

Findings point towards an imbalance in the use of mentoring and coaching within education, with a particular underuse of coaching for pre-service teachers. Some mentoring (and indeed coaching) interventions are founded on a deficit model; therefore mentors of pre-service teachers could be helped and supported to make greater use of a mentor-coach integrated asset-based approach, which encourages the use of reflection and self-directed learning.

Practical implications

Schools using internal mentors for pre-service teachers, or internal coaches for post-qualified teachers, could benefit from understanding what a mentor-coach integrated approach might look like, founded on an asset-based model.

Originality/value

The literature is limited with regards to the use of coaching for pre-service teachers. This paper examines the use of mentoring and coaching within schools in a more balanced way; questioning the underlying beliefs about the purpose of mentoring and coaching and whether or not these are based on deficit or asset-based models.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

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Article

Eileen M. Narcotta, Jeffrey C. Petersen and Scott R. Johnson

Team performance in sport is not limited to the players, but extends to the coaching staff and their relationships. This study aims to identify mentoring functions…

Abstract

Purpose

Team performance in sport is not limited to the players, but extends to the coaching staff and their relationships. This study aims to identify mentoring functions reported by NCAA Division I assistant women's soccer coaches within a head coach‐assistant coach dyad and examine gender impact on these functions.

Design/methodology/approach

The Mentor Role Instrument questionnaire, completed by 39.7 percent of applicable assistant coaches, determined the mentor functions present. Means for the 11 mentor functions were ranked and compared via ANOVA.

Findings

Post hoc testing showed the parent mentor function at the lowest level with the social function second lowest. The mentor functions of acceptance, friendship, sponsor, and challenging assignments ranked as the statistically highest group of factors. Assistant coach gender significantly impacted the mentor function of social, with male assistant coaches higher than females. Gender of the head coach significantly impacted the mentor function of parent with assistant coaches having male head coaches reporting greater parent functions. Gender also impacted the social mentor function in the head coach/ assistant coach dyad with male‐male dyads significantly greater than the male‐female dyads.

Research limitations/implications

The current research is limited by its narrow scope. Future research should consider mentor effects on job satisfaction and occupational turnover intent, expansion to other levels of women's soccer, and expansion into men's sports for further analysis of mentoring in coaching.

Originality/value

As the first study to document mentor functions in coaching these results provide baseline data to guide future research and support the development of mentoring programs in coaching.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article

Bruce G. Barnett

An important function of mentoring is to assistprotégés in becoming autonomous professionals who reflectand solve problems as experts. The emerging literature on…

Abstract

An important function of mentoring is to assist protégés in becoming autonomous professionals who reflect and solve problems as experts. The emerging literature on information processing, reflective practice, and expertise indicates: experts solve problems differently than novices; and learners who participate in a structured instructional programme can learn these higher‐order conceptual skills. Based on these findings, examines the principles and practices of cognitive coaching as a viable means for mentors to use in developing the reflective and problem‐solving expertise of their protégés. Provides practical suggestions for how mentor/coaches can utilize reflective questioning strategies, clarify and probe responses, and take a non‐judgemental stance. Concludes with an overview of a training model which would prepare and support mentors in their attempt to assist protégés in becoming self‐directed, expert problem solvers.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Book part

Magnus Klofsten and Staffan Öberg

This chapter focuses on two major concepts in entrepreneurship training, namely coaching and mentoring. A study of these concepts reveals at least two schools of thought…

Abstract

This chapter focuses on two major concepts in entrepreneurship training, namely coaching and mentoring. A study of these concepts reveals at least two schools of thought, that coaching and mentoring are two parallel and distinct activities that can be used to support each other, and that coaching and mentoring are not separate activities — coaching is considered part of the mentoring activity or mentoring part of the coaching activity. Data from 36 university-based training programmes and 450 coaching and mentoring cases at 7 Swedish universities were analysed. We used a checklist to gather information on 21 items linked to these 4 distinctive groups: first structural issues (mission, form and task); second, process issues (i.e. connection to programme content, meeting environment, problem solving, assessing the opportunity or idea, operative role, confidentiality and networking); third relationship (i.e. extent, meeting, initiative, homework, documentation and follow-up) and fourth character of the coach and mentor (background and experience, engagement, integrity, social skills and role or ethics).

Coaching and mentoring differed markedly, for example in terms of mission, problem solving and use of generalist versus specialist competence. Similarities occurred in the areas of opportunity or idea assessment, and meeting environment, operative role and confidentiality agreements. The authors are convinced that the coach and the mentor have different roles in helping the young individual to become a better entrepreneur. Coaching and mentoring were found to be parallel activities that complement each other.

Details

New Technology-Based Firms in the New Millennium
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-118-3

Abstract

Details

Coaching and Mentoring for Academic Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-907-7

Abstract

Details

Coaching and Mentoring for Academic Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-907-7

Abstract

Details

The Catalyst Effect
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-551-3

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Article

Geoff Mead, Jan Campbell and Mike Milan

The authors have drawn on their experience of professional supervision, coaching and mentoring in a variety of circumstances to examine the theory and practice of…

Abstract

The authors have drawn on their experience of professional supervision, coaching and mentoring in a variety of circumstances to examine the theory and practice of supervision in the context of the fast‐growing field of executive coaching. They suggest some fundamental principles that underpin effective supervision, explore the various domains of supervisory conversations, consider aspects of the supervisor’s personal style and present a range of possible structures for providing supervision one‐to‐one and in groups. Some tried and tested practical “tips” for getting the most out of supervision are included together with contrasting personal reflections on the supervisory relationships shared by the authors over a three‐year period. The authors conclude that regular supervision of professional coaches and mentors is an ethical and practical (though often neglected) imperative. Suggestions for further research in this area are directed at the need to pay attention to client outcomes as a test for effective supervision.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 4 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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