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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2011

Daisy Bogg

The emphasis on outcomes rather than process is an area that is receiving significant attention across the delivery of public sector services, and the question ‘so what? 

Abstract

The emphasis on outcomes rather than process is an area that is receiving significant attention across the delivery of public sector services, and the question ‘so what?’ is increasingly being asked of service providers. With service user self‐direction being the focus of both provision and commissioning over the coming years, there will be an increasing need to justify the delivery and development of social care in terms of the end result. Strong leadership and vision is required across the public sector if this change, in both organisational culture and service user expectation, is to be achieved.Leadership as both a competency and an organisational function has been well researched within health and social care. The literature largely points towards the need for clarity and strength within the strategic vision, especially when considering the management of change and multifaceted partnerships, both of which are crucial to the delivery of social care outcomes. The actual detail of the outcome framework, and the means by which it can be measured and quantified, is still an area of debate, and as such the aim here is to highlight some of the benefits and barriers that may be faced as the reform of the social care system evolves, with a specific focus on the impact that leadership can have on the delivery of an outcome‐focused mental health social care serviceThe analysis of outcome‐focused organisations is a relatively new concept in health and social care, and as such this paper seeks to debate the evidence in terms of whether leadership contributes to better service user outcomes in mental health social care. Dynamics within organisations, professions and with service users are all key considerations in the achievement of positive outcomes, and the role of the leader is to empower the staff group to power share and move towards co‐production in order to embed choice, control and service user contribution in the overall philosophy and culture of mental health service provision and developments.The overall conclusions of this paper are that leadership is important in terms of shaping services, ensuring governance and promoting innovation, and as a result it is possible to suggest that leadership and positive outcomes do have a direct correlation.

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International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2008

David Palmer, Ermias Alemu and Julian Hopwood

This research project explored how refugee community organisations (RCOs) could become more involved in the government's health agenda to improve the level of consultation…

Abstract

This research project explored how refugee community organisations (RCOs) could become more involved in the government's health agenda to improve the level of consultation and responsiveness in the design and provision of mental health services for ethnic minorities. The method involved a review of relevant literature, interviews with refugee community organisation leaders and community workers, and a survey of refugee service users' involvement with RCOs. The research found that the causes and effects of mental ill health in refugees as understood by interviewees were consistent with much of the literature in this area. The mental health needs of refugees are very similar across nationalities and ethnicities, and distinct from those of the general population and of other migrant groups. Appropriate responses, as understood by community leaders and professional community workers, are currently only partly and insufficiently provided by statutory health services, and there is extensive unmet need.

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International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2008

Steven Walker

This paper describes and discusses the evaluation of an innovative child and adolescent mental health project located in a large county in eastern England. The project was…

Abstract

This paper describes and discusses the evaluation of an innovative child and adolescent mental health project located in a large county in eastern England. The project was one of eight located in the voluntary sector and supported by the Mental Health Foundation as part of a national initiative aimed at responding in new, accessible ways to young people requiring help for emotional and mental health problems. Traditional specialist CAMH services are overwhelmed by demand while also failing to engage many young people. This study provides evidence of how new services can develop to meet the needs of troubled young people in appropriate and acceptable ways.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 23 July 2020

Salma Ali and Jessica Phipps

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the current service provision offered by a mental health service in a young offenders institute (YOI) in England.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the current service provision offered by a mental health service in a young offenders institute (YOI) in England.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative exploratory approach was adopted. Five prison officers (POs) (four male and one female) with direct experience supporting young people through mental health intervention were interviewed using semi-structured interviews. Data was analysed using thematic analysis (Braun and Clarke, 2006), which allowed evaluation of the current mental health provision to evolve.

Findings

Five overarching themes (process of referrals; intervention and its impact; role and function of the health and well-being team; collaboration and involvement; and feedback, communication and intervention) were found to be highly salient when evaluating service provision. Notably all themes interrelated with one another, demonstrating that changes or improvements made to the service need to consider all factors individually and collectively.

Research limitations/implications

This study was based on a small sample of POs in only one YOI in England, and therefore cannot be generalised to the entire prison estate. However, it does offer a rich insight into local service provision from the perspective of a group whose opinion is rarely sought.

Practical implications

POs’ perspectives of service provision are important in informing service developments. Lessons can be learnt from their unique insight into how prison mental health services are run to improve processes and collaborative working in the management of young offenders with mental health difficulties.

Originality/value

This preliminary and exploratory study is, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, the first study evaluating service provision by using the perspectives of POs. The findings suggest that POs make valuable contributions to the service development and should be involved in similar evaluations in future.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2007

Eddie Chaplin and Jean O'Hara

In the last decade we have witnessed much debate and activity around the provision of mental health services for people with learning disabilities in England. This article…

Abstract

In the last decade we have witnessed much debate and activity around the provision of mental health services for people with learning disabilities in England. This article looks not only at current initiatives to improve mental health care from around England, but also places them within a policy context. Unfortunately there are areas that still fail to provide a basic care standard, some of which has been reported throughout the media from recent investigations. Where this is the case, we outline the responses and actions that have been put in place to address these issues.To maintain a momentum for positive change for the mental health care of people with learning disabilities, there now needs to be cooperation between services that traditionally have not worked together for the benefit of this client group. Before an equality of mental health service provision, in line with national standards, can be realised the traditional views and values of service providers and commissioners will need to be challenged and tuned to the needs of this group of people.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2007

Laurence Taggart

The aim of this paper is to provide readers with an overview of service provision for people with learning disabilities and psychiatric disorders in Northern Ireland. The…

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to provide readers with an overview of service provision for people with learning disabilities and psychiatric disorders in Northern Ireland. The first part of this paper briefly describes how learning disability services are structured, and highlights how service provision across Northern Ireland is set to dramatically change as a result of Equal Lives (Department of Health, Social Services and Public Safety, 2005) and overall healthcare modernisation. Second, this paper will explore the prevalence rates of psychiatric disorders in people with learning disabilities in light of recent Northern Irish studies. Third, a review of current psychiatric service provision is provided, this is followed by an examination of recent hospital and community developments. Finally, this paper describes some educational and research developments that have focused on the mental health of people with learning disabilities.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2008

David Palmer and Cath Maffia

Refugees are among the most socially excluded and marginalised groups in the UK. This paper examines ways in which the refugee service user's voice can be heard and the…

Abstract

Refugees are among the most socially excluded and marginalised groups in the UK. This paper examines ways in which the refugee service user's voice can be heard and the power imbalance between service provider and service user addressed. Lessons learned from addressing the needs of refugees can be extrapolated for other disadvantaged groups.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2007

Helen Taylor, Maria Stuttaford and Panos Vostanis

The voluntary sector has an important role to play in the provision of services for people with mental health needs of lesser severity, thus complementing statutory…

Abstract

The voluntary sector has an important role to play in the provision of services for people with mental health needs of lesser severity, thus complementing statutory services, as suggested by recent national policy. This article describes such a service for young homeless people, and discusses the perceptions of key stakeholders of the benefits and challenges of such a service. The service largely met the mental health needs of young people who would not have easily accessed statutory mental health services, and who fulfilled the criteria (low/moderate need) of the service. Challenges for the future included the different organisational cultures, the professional isolation of the mental health practitioners and the lack of operational and commissioning links with statutory mental health services.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

David Palmer

This article is concerned with strategies for combating health inequalities for refugees. It explores a service provider's (St Pancras Refugee Centre) response to the…

Abstract

This article is concerned with strategies for combating health inequalities for refugees. It explores a service provider's (St Pancras Refugee Centre) response to the mental health and social care needs of refugees in the London Borough of Camden. Drawing on primary and secondary research, the article presents relevant findings and theoretical discourse in this area. It also draws on my own experience of working with refugees, providing a holistic approach to their social care requirements. The main focus is an examination of how social care and mental health needs are addressed. The article argues that providers need to develop services which engage with users on a mutually beneficial level in order to combat health inequalities and provide adequate health and social care provision.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Jenny Castle, Michael Rutter, Celia Beckett, Emma Colvert, Christine Groothues, Amanda Hawkins, Jana Kreppner, Thomas O'Connor, Suzanne Stevens and Edmund Sonuga‐Barke

Service use between six and 11 years of age is reported for children adopted from Romania into UK families, and compared with that for children adopted within the UK…

Abstract

Service use between six and 11 years of age is reported for children adopted from Romania into UK families, and compared with that for children adopted within the UK before six months of age. Between six and 11, there had been only one adoption breakdown, and about one in ten couples experienced a marital breakdown. Apart from continuing concerns over hepatitis B carrier status in a small number of children, physical health problems were not a prominent feature. By contrast, nearly one‐third of the children from Romania placed in UK families after the age of six months received mental health services provision ‐ a rate far higher than the 11 to 15% in the groups adopted before the age of six months. Such provision was strongly related to research assessments of mental health problems and largely concerned syndromes that were relatively specific to institutional deprivation (quasi‐autism, disinhibited attachment and inattention/overactivity). There were similar differences between the UK adoptees and the adoptees from Romania entering the UK after six months of age in major special educational provision and, again, the findings showed that the provision was in accord with research assessments of scholastic achievement. The between group differences for lesser special educational provision were much smaller and there was some tendency for the early adopted groups to receive such provision for lesser degrees of scholastic problems than the children adopted from Romania who entered the UK after six months of age. The policy and practice implications of the findings are briefly discussed.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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