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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2016

Mohamed S. Mahfouz, Abdulwahab Aqeeli, Anwar M. Makeen, Ramzi M. Hakami, Hatim H. Najmi, Abdullkarim T. Mobarki, Mohammad H. Haroobi, Saeed M. Almalki, Mohammad A. Mahnashi and Osayd A. Ageel

The issue of mental health literacy has been widely studied in developed countries, with few studies conducted in Arab countries. In this study we aimed to investigate…

Abstract

The issue of mental health literacy has been widely studied in developed countries, with few studies conducted in Arab countries. In this study we aimed to investigate mental health literacy and attitudes towards psychiatric patients among students of Jazan University, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. A cross-sectional study was conducted among undergraduate students using a validated Arabic-version questionnaire. A total of 557 students were recruited from different Jazan university colleges. The majority of students (90.3%) have intermediate mental health literacy. Regarding the etiology of mental illness, students agreed that genetic inheritance (45.8%), poor quality of life (65%) and social relationship weakness (73.1%) are the main causes of mental illness. The majority thought that mentally ill people are not capable of true friendships (52.5%) and that anyone can suffer from a mental illness (49.4%). Students' attitudes towards psychiatric patients were mixed, with 68.7% reporting that they could maintain a friendship with a mentally ill person and that people with mental illness should have the same rights as anyone else (82.5%). Mental health literacy among university students was intermediate. There is an urgent need for health educational programs to change the attitudes of students regarding this important health issue.

Details

Mental Illness, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2036-7465

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Article
Publication date: 18 December 2019

Rubina Begum, Fahad Riaz Choudhry, Tahir Mehmood Khan, Faizah Safina Bakrin, Yaser Mohammed Al-Worafi and Khadeeja Munawar

The term “Mental health literacy” is defined as knowledge and beliefs about mental disorders which aid their recognition, management or prevention. The importance of health

Abstract

Purpose

The term “Mental health literacy” is defined as knowledge and beliefs about mental disorders which aid their recognition, management or prevention. The importance of health literacy for physical health is widely studied; however, the area of mental health literacy in Pakistan has been comparatively neglected. The purpose of this paper is to address the knowledge about mental health in people living in Pakistan.

Design/methodology/approach

Relevant literature relating to mental health literacy was identified through various database searches. The databases searched included: PubMed, Cochrane database of Systemic Reviews, PsycINFO using the terms mental health, mental health literacy, mental health education, Pakistan.

Findings

Literature suggests that there is dearth of knowledge about mental illnesses and their treatment among public. This review also highlights the importance of mental health literacy among professionals working in the field of health care. In Pakistan, due to low literacy rate, a high percentage of poverty and dearth of trained professionals warrants an emendation in approaches established for attaining the goal of public health and psychiatric care.

Practical implications

Findings have implications for practitioners in the field of mental health care as well as designing targeted interventions for enhancing mental health literacy and help-seeking behavior in the future.

Originality/value

A limited understanding and lack of improvement in mental health literacy may interfere with society’s acceptance of evidence-based mental health care which may hamper the delivery of adequate mental health services to the needy.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Paul Gorczynski, Wendy Sims-schouten, Denise Hill and Janet Clare Wilson

Many university students in the UK experience mental health problems and little is known about their overall mental health literacy and help-seeking behaviours. The…

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Abstract

Purpose

Many university students in the UK experience mental health problems and little is known about their overall mental health literacy and help-seeking behaviours. The purpose of this paper is to ascertain levels of mental health literacy in UK university students and to examine whether mental health literacy is associated with better mental health outcomes and intentions to seek professional care.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 380 university students at a university in the south of England completed online surveys measuring multiple dimensions of mental health literacy, help-seeking behaviour, distress, and well-being.

Findings

Mental health literacy in the students sampled was lower than seen in previous research. Women exhibited higher levels of mental health literacy than men and postgraduate students scored higher than undergraduate students. Participants with previous mental health problems had higher levels of mental health literacy than those with no history of mental health problems. Individuals were most likely to want to seek support from a partner or family member and most participants indicated they would be able to access mental health information online. Mental health literacy was significantly positively correlated with help-seeking behaviour, but not significantly correlated with distress or well-being.

Practical implications

Strategies, such as anonymous online resources, should be designed to help UK university students become more knowledgeable about mental health and comfortable with seeking appropriate support.

Originality/value

This study is the first to examine multiple dimensions of mental health literacy in UK university students and compare it to help-seeking behaviour, distress, and well-being.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 19 November 2021

Talya Postelnik, Rhonda Robertson, Angela Jury, Heather Kongs-Taylor, Sarah Hetrick and Charito Tuason

Mental health literacy programmes can help reduce stigma towards people who experience mental health challenges. Co-facilitated mental health literacy programmes…

Abstract

Purpose

Mental health literacy programmes can help reduce stigma towards people who experience mental health challenges. Co-facilitated mental health literacy programmes, delivered by a person with lived experience of mental health challenges in partnership with a person with clinical experience in mental health services, may further reduce stigma. This qualitative study aims to explore participants’ satisfaction with a co-facilitated mental health literacy programme and facilitator characteristics influencing satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used deidentified post-workshop evaluation data from 762 community mental health literacy programme participants (86% response rate). Thematic analysis of qualitative data used a general inductive approach.

Findings

Findings indicate high satisfaction with the co-facilitation model used to deliver a mental health literacy programme. Three key themes related to co-facilitation satisfaction: how participants perceived the co-facilitation model overall; the impact of having two facilitators that offered different knowledge and perspectives about mental health challenges; and the impact of personal stories shared. The personal stories shared by facilitators were perceived as bringing the workshop content to life and providing insights into people’s experiences and well-being journey. Key themes influencing co-facilitation satisfaction related to facilitator knowledge, skills, values and attitudes.

Practical implications

Findings indicate the positive impact of incorporating people’s lived experience into the design and delivery of mental health literacy programmes. Findings highlight key facilitator characteristics and support needs when recruiting facilitators to deliver programmes. This includes good facilitation skills alongside personal experiences.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first large study examining satisfaction with a co-facilitated mental health literacy programme for the general public.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2021

Kevin Dadaczynski, Claudia Kotarski, Katharina Rathmann and Orkan Okan

School principals are generally seen as key facilitators for the delivery and long-term implementation of activities on school health promotion, including health literacy

Abstract

Purpose

School principals are generally seen as key facilitators for the delivery and long-term implementation of activities on school health promotion, including health literacy. However, there is little evidence on the health literacy and health status of this occupational group. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the health literacy of school principals and its association with mental health indicators.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional online survey with German school principals and members of the management board (vice principals) was conducted (n = 680, 68.3% female). Demographic (gender, age) and work characteristics (type of school, professional role) as well as health literacy served as independent variables. Mental health as a dependent variable included well-being, emotional exhaustion and psychosomatic complaints. Next to uni- and bivariate analysis, a series of binary logistic regression models was performed.

Findings

Of the respondents, 29.2% showed a limited health literacy with significant differences to the disadvantage of male principals. With regard to mental health, respondents aged over 60 years and those from schools for children with special educational needs were less often affected by low well-being as well as frequent emotional exhaustion and psychosomatic complaints. Taking into account demographic and work characteristics, regression models revealed significant associations between a low level of health literacy and poor mental health across all indicators.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional nature of this study does not allow to draw conclusions about the causal pathways between health literacy and mental health. Although the sample has been weighted, the results cannot be generalized to the whole population of school principals. There is a need for evidence-based interventions aiming at promoting health literacy and mental health tailored to the needs of school principals.

Originality/value

This is the first study to investigate health literacy and its association with health indicators among school principals.

Details

Health Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2020

Paul Gorczynski, Wendy Sims-Schouten and Clare Wilson

Despite a high prevalence of mental health problems, few students know where to turn for support. The purpose of this study was to gain a UK wide perspective on levels of…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite a high prevalence of mental health problems, few students know where to turn for support. The purpose of this study was to gain a UK wide perspective on levels of mental health literacy amongst university students and to examine the relationship between mental health literacy and mental health help-seeking behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 300 university students in the UK participated in this online cross-sectional study. Participants filled out the mental health literacy scale, the general help-seeking questionnaire, Kessler psychological distress scale 10, The Warwick-Edinburgh mental well-being scale and the self-compassion scale: short form.

Findings

Overall, 78 per cent of participants indicated mild or more severe symptoms of distress. Students reported lower levels of mental health literacy when compared to students in other nations. Women, bisexuals, and those with a history of mental disorders indicated high levels of mental health literacy. Participants indicated they were most likely to seek support from intimate partners and least likely to seek support from religious leaders. No significant correlations were found between mental health literacy and help-seeking behaviours. Mental health literacy was not correlated with distress, mental well-being or self-compassion. Help-seeking behaviours were only significantly positively correlated with mental well-being.

Originality/value

Universities should address strategies to improve help-seeking behaviours in an effort to address overall mental well-being. Programmes may wish to help provide students with information about accessing face-to-face support systems. Environmental strategies to foster mental well-being on campus should also be explored.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2019

Mahafuz Mannan, Reaz Ahamed and Sifat Binte Zaman

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the direct effects of eHealth literacy, perceived competence, perceived electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM) credibility and price…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the direct effects of eHealth literacy, perceived competence, perceived electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM) credibility and price perception on consumers' willingness to purchase online mental health services. This study also examines the mediating role of perceived information quality on the eHealth literacy-consumers' willingness to purchase online mental health services relationship and the moderating roles of perceived eWOM credibility and price perception on the perceived competence-consumers' willingness to purchase online mental health services relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on an extensive literature review, a conceptual model was developed. The research design was cross-sectional. A total of 400 respondents participated in the self-administered survey. After discarding some questionnaires due to incompleteness and lack of variance, a total of 367 responses was used in final data analysis. Partial least square structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) was used to test the proposed model.

Findings

eHealth literacy, perceived competence, perceived eWOM credibility and price perception were found to have significant positive direct effects on consumers' willingness to purchase online mental health services. Perceived information quality was found to have a significant partial mediating effect on the eHealth literacy-consumers' willingness to purchase online mental health services relationship. Both perceived eWOM credibility and price perception were found to have significant positive moderating effects on the perceived competence-consumers' willingness to purchase online mental health services relationship.

Originality/value

Studies concerning online mental health services from a marketing or business perspective is almost non-existent. Therefore, this study contributes to the scarce literature in that context. This is the first study that has investigated how eHealth literacy, perceived information quality, perceived competence, perceived eWOM credibility and price perception influence consumers' willingness to purchase online mental health services.

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Article
Publication date: 18 December 2017

Kate Morgaine, Louise Thompson, Katie Jahnke and Rebecca Llewellyn

“GoodYarn” is a skills-based workshop that focusses on building mental health literacy in rural communities, members of which are known to experience geographic…

Abstract

Purpose

“GoodYarn” is a skills-based workshop that focusses on building mental health literacy in rural communities, members of which are known to experience geographic, attitudinal and service configuration barriers to accessing mental health services. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact of the GoodYarn project on raising mental health literacy in the rural community.

Design/methodology/approach

GoodYarn is primarily for farmers, their families and farm workers, as well as the “farmer facing” workforce. The focus on mental health literacy aligns with the mental health promotion approach of using methods that foster supportive environments. By raising the mental health literacy of those not directly needing help, but in positions to help those that do – such as employers, rural professionals and rural support industries who are well placed to perceive stressors in farmers – GoodYarn builds a community with the knowledge and skills to identify and approach those experiencing mental distress or illness, and direct them to appropriate support and services. All participants in the GoodYarn workshops (n=430) were invited to complete a questionnaire at the end of the workshop. All participants answered the questionnaire, with over 80 per cent answering all questions.

Findings

Participant feedback affirmed the utility of GoodYarn as an effective vehicle to facilitate the discussion of mental illness in rural farming communities of New Zealand. GoodYarn had a significant positive impact on the three immediate workshop indicators of awareness, confidence and knowledge (p<0.001 for all three indicators). Further, the high level of concordance in workshop outcomes across various organisations’ delivery indicates programme consistency and quality has been maintained throughout the upscaling of the programme.

Originality/value

The uptake of the GoodYarn programme by rural organisations and communities at a national level, and the positive evaluation results, provide encouragement that building mental health literacy in the rural workforce is a promising mental health promotion strategy.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 9 September 2014

Santosh Loganathan and Matthew Kreuter

Improving mental health literacy is a key component of any population-based mental health program, especially in low- and middle-income countries. Effective strategies to…

Abstract

Purpose

Improving mental health literacy is a key component of any population-based mental health program, especially in low- and middle-income countries. Effective strategies to increase awareness and reduce stigma associated with mental health are sparse and have not been evaluated in India or among other low- and middle-income countries. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The review was based on the literature obtained from articles identified by searches of Medline, PubMed, and Google (Scholar) with the Mesh terms “mental health literacy”, “developing countries,” and “audience segmentation” between 1979 and 2012. Information was also obtained by interacting with experts in the field of health communication and public health, one of whom (M.K.) is a co-author.

Findings

Systematic reviews of studies among occidental countries have proposed that targeted approaches to mental health literacy are not only more effective, but also more cost-effective than general population approaches. Using audience segmentation to target distinct population sub-groups is a well-established best practice in health communication, is recommended for low resource settings and in situations with a limited budget, and may be especially effective when based on socio-cultural variables.

Originality/value

Yet to date it has not been applied in India for mental-health-related communication. The need for such cost-effective, innovative, and equitable strategies for mental health literacy is the cornerstone to mitigate stigma associated with mental illness, and improve awareness among a proportionately illiterate population.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 4 August 2021

Shannon C. King, Amanda L. Rebar, Paul Oliveri and Robert Stanton

This paper aims to present the current state of evidence regarding the mental health literacy of paramedics and student paramedics and whether mental health literacy

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the current state of evidence regarding the mental health literacy of paramedics and student paramedics and whether mental health literacy affects the care that paramedics provide to their patients with mental illness.

Design/methodology/approach

Embase, PubMed, Medline and Google Scholar were searched for recent (2010–2020) English language published articles using the key phrases paramedic AND/OR ambulance AND mental health AND mental health literacy. Additional searches of the reference lists of included articles were undertaken. A descriptive thematic analysis was used to arrive at a narrative synthesis of the study findings.

Findings

The emergency medical services system has taken a primary role in the care of patients with mental illness but has limited capacity for non-emergency psychosocial situations. Negative and judgemental attitudes amongst paramedics towards patients with mental illness is a significant issue and remains a barrier to patients seeking medical care for mental illness. Improved care provision and patient engagement might result from specific education aimed to better enhance paramedics’ mental health literacy.

Originality/value

This literature review provides insights into the current practice of mental health training for Australian undergraduate paramedic science students and the implications for patient care. Recommendations for educational strategies are provided.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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