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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2013

Patrick Larsson

The purpose of this paper is to establish that social determinants are vital contributing factors to mental health difficulties and that, similar to physical health, mental

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish that social determinants are vital contributing factors to mental health difficulties and that, similar to physical health, mental health follows a social gradient. Despite this acknowledgement, there is a rhetoric/reality gap found in social determinants of mental health (SDMH). It will be argued in this paper that this rhetoric/reality gap is located on a number of levels, including theoretical, methodological, practical, political and policy based, which are proposed here to be interrelated.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach is a conceptual analysis of the rhetoric/reality gap found in SDMH using a critical perspective. It draws on a wide variety of theories in order to provide an analysis of the issues outlined.

Findings

The paper's central finding is that there is a dissonance between the dominant ontological, epistemological and methodological, or axiomatic, focus in contemporary mental health theory and practice and SDMH. This dissonance has led to a form of “analysis paralysis” on all levels, and the initiatives required to tackle SDMH have been marginalised in favour of a narrow interpretation of evidence-based research and its accompanying ideology centring on the individual, which has established itself as a primary position on what constitutes valid knowledge to the detriment of other views.

Originality/value

The paper offers a critical perspective on an area of SDMH which is often alluded to but never explicitly explored, and questions the underlying assumptions inherent to mental health theory and practice. The paper's value is that it draws attention to this particular dilemma on a wider scale, including on a political and policy-based level, which is often neglected in mental health theory, and it makes some recommendations on how to move forward.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Abstract

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Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2007

Lynne Friedli

Abstract

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Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2008

Wendy Simpson, Graham Buchanan and Graham Monteith

Playfield Institute is a unique partnership between child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) and public health. The institute model is an innovative response to…

Abstract

Playfield Institute is a unique partnership between child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) and public health. The institute model is an innovative response to the national challenge to mainstream mental health. Its focus is to build the capacity of frontline workers (otherwise known as the children's workforce eg. school nurses, social workers, teachers, foster carers etc.) to promote the mental health of children and young people. It works by providing a multi‐agency forum for sharing information and developing practical skills on how to help children flourish. It also encourages reflection on practice and undertakes research that has a direct impact on the development of training and practice. To date, the Institute has achieved the following main outcomes: the facilitation of a successful training programme, the development of a well used, effective, online resource and the co‐ordination of a range of applied research projects. This paper discusses why the Institute was set up, what it is, what it has achieved and how the model is sustainable.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2007

Lynne Friedli and Michael Parsonage

This paper uses economic analysis to develop the case for greater investment in mental health promotion. One example of a common mental health problem for which there is…

Abstract

This paper uses economic analysis to develop the case for greater investment in mental health promotion. One example of a common mental health problem for which there is robust evidence of effective interventions is conduct disorder. The paper estimates that preventing conduct disorders in those children who are most disturbed would save around £150,000 per case (lifetime costs), and that promoting positive mental health in those children with moderate mental health would yield lifetime benefits of around £75,000 per case. Investment in support for parents is therefore the top priority in a provisional list of ‘best buys’ in promoting mental health.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Developing Leaders for Positive Organizing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-241-1

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2010

Lindsay Blank, Susan Baxter, Elizabeth Goyder, Paul Naylor, Louise Guillaume, Anna Wilkinson, Silvia Hummel and Jim Chilcott

This paper reports on a systematic review of the published literature on the effectiveness of whole‐school behavioural interventions, which aim to promote emotional and…

Abstract

This paper reports on a systematic review of the published literature on the effectiveness of whole‐school behavioural interventions, which aim to promote emotional and social well‐being among young people in secondary education. The findings are based on 27 studies of varying designs with some limitations. The results suggest that the literature is not well developed, and has a substantial skew towards interventions conducted in the United States. However, it does suggest that conflict resolution training is successful in promoting pro‐social behaviours in the short term, and that the use of peer mediators may be effective for longer‐term outcomes. The evidence relating to preventing bullying and disruptive behaviour is more varied, with evidence of mixed effectiveness being identified for the roles of the community, teachers, young people, external agencies and parents.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2019

Jonathan Glazzard

Supporting the mental health of children and young people is a global priority. The issue is not specific to England. However, evidence suggests that one in ten children…

Abstract

Purpose

Supporting the mental health of children and young people is a global priority. The issue is not specific to England. However, evidence suggests that one in ten children and young people in England has a mental health need. This represents approximately three students in every classroom. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the role of schools in supporting children and young people’s mental health. Whilst the paper acknowledges that teachers are not trained health professionals, it is argued that a whole-school approach to mental health can support individuals in schools to remain mentally healthy. The elements of a whole-school approach are identified and discussed and some of the challenges in relation to implementation are considered. Critical to the development of a whole-school approach is the commitment from the school leadership team to promoting student and staff wellbeing.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a policy paper not an empirical study.

Findings

This paper has outlined the policy context in the UK in relation to children and young people’s mental health. It has addressed the risk and protective factors which can cause or mitigate against mental ill health and it has outlined the elements of a whole-school approach to mental health.

Originality/value

This paper explores the contribution that schools can make to supporting students’ mental health. There is limited research which addresses mental health in young people from a non-therapeutic angle.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2019

Pia Crista Milana Solin, Jaakko Reinikainen, Tuija Martelin and Nina Tamminen

The purpose of this paper is to investigate positive mental health (PMH) and factors related to it among those living alone in the sparsely populated area of the Lapland region.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate positive mental health (PMH) and factors related to it among those living alone in the sparsely populated area of the Lapland region.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilises data from the Mental Health Survey of the Lapland region in Finland, covering 12 municipalities. The scores of short Warwick–Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale (sWEMWBS) were categorised into three levels of PMH. Logistic regression models were used to separately estimate the odds ratios for the high level of PMH compared with the moderate level of PMH and the low level of PMH compared with the moderate level.

Findings

Social support seemed to be very strongly associated with both low and high levels of PMH among people living alone. Participating in activities provided by organisations or societies decreased the odds of having low PMH. Among men, young age predicted low PMH.

Originality/value

The number of people living alone in Finland and other parts of Europe is increasing, yet there are few studies focusing on their positive mental health (PMH). Using scales such as sWEMWBS adds to the authors’ knowledge about the positive mental well-being of those living alone, especially in rural areas, thus making it possible to utilise mental health promotion interventions effectively and accordingly.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2011

Helene L. Provencher and Corey L.M. Keyes

The purpose of this paper is to propose that the study, and the promotion, of recovery can be augmented by adopting the model of mental health as a complete state.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose that the study, and the promotion, of recovery can be augmented by adopting the model of mental health as a complete state.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review of the last two decades was undertaken and pathways to complete mental health in recovery are proposed.

Findings

More work is needed to further develop interventions oriented towards the promotion of positive mental health in recovery, targeting the enhancement of positive emotions towards life and a sense of fulfillment in private and social life. Positive mental health also deserves more research attention to assess the full range of recovery outcomes related to the restoration and optimization processes. A better understanding of individual and environmental factors facilitating or hindering the achievement of complete mental health in recovery is warranted as well.

Originality/value

Unlike previous conceptions, the model presented in the paper proposes to redefine recovery from the complete view of mental health and introduces positive mental health as an additional outcome of recovery.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

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