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Article
Publication date: 2 December 2014

Naomi Russell and Jennifer Taylor

The purpose of this paper is to describe the work of the Children and Young People's Programme of Time to Change, which is England's biggest campaign to end the stigma and

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the work of the Children and Young People's Programme of Time to Change, which is England's biggest campaign to end the stigma and discrimination that surrounds mental health.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws upon research into the nature and effects of mental health stigma and discrimination on young people and also outlines the strategy of the Time to Change campaign and its initial outcomes.

Findings

The paper includes testimonies from young people with lived experience of mental health problems about the stigma and discrimination they have faced. It also outlines the aims, objectives and stages of implementation of the Time to Change Children and Young People's Programme. The paper particularly focuses on the campaign work undertaken in secondary schools, the social leadership programme for young people with lived experience of mental health problems and the process of designing effective campaign messaging for social media.

Originality/value

Time to Change is England's biggest campaign to end the stigma and discrimination that surrounds mental health. This paper provides a unique insight into the process of developing and rolling out an anti-stigma campaign for young people.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2003

Hazel Morgan

Young people with learning disabilities are at risk of developing mental health problems. The Foundation for People with Learning Disabilities conducted a one‐year inquiry…

Abstract

Young people with learning disabilities are at risk of developing mental health problems. The Foundation for People with Learning Disabilities conducted a one‐year inquiry into meeting their mental health needs. This paper explores ways of supporting emotional resilience and the response of services when young people with learning disabilities experience mental distress.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Book part
Publication date: 8 June 2020

Mhemooda Malek and Simon Newitt

This chapter aims to give an overview of key mental health policy and service provision, highlighting the need for specific attention to Black and minority ethnic children…

Abstract

This chapter aims to give an overview of key mental health policy and service provision, highlighting the need for specific attention to Black and minority ethnic children and young people. The focus is on mental health provision in the UK provided through the statutory sector and the voluntary and community sector, the issues raised are likely to have resonance across wider geographic locations. The themes examined include: the relevance of terminology regarding race and ethnicity and related impact on the planning and provision of services; the extent to which policy and commissioning of services give due focus and attention to the mental health of Black and minority ethnic children and young people; views young people themselves have contributed on the issue; and a case study illustrating work being undertaken to redress some of the imbalances encountered by young people in accessing appropriate support. The chapter argues that the supply chain to young people receiving support that is relevant and appropriate to their needs is a long and complex one. It is fundamental to take a holistic approach and consider how the components of this chain impact specifically on the mental health of children and young people from Black and minority ethnic communities.

Child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) – This term refers to all services that work with children and young people to address their behavioural and emotional wellbeing needs. The services may be provided by the National Health Service (NHS), local authority, school, private sector or charitable organisation and span early intervention support through to specialist treatment.

Care Quality Commission – The independent regulator of health and social care services in England.

Commissioning – The process by which health services are procured and should be based on an up-to-date assessment and understanding of needs of the target population.

Co-production – A process for planning and delivery of health and social care services that involves partnership working and power sharing between those responsible for the planning and provision of services, service users, their family members, carers and other citizens.

National Service Framework – Ten year programmes that, until the health and social care reforms started in 2010, defined standards of care in the NHS including measurable goals within set timeframes.

Population Needs Assessments – The collection and study of relevant data to understand and estimate current and future needs of a population in order to inform the planning of services that meet identified needs.

Voluntary and Community Sector – Also referred to as the Third Sector and encompassing a diverse range of organisations, services and groups that are seen as distinct from the public (also referred to as statutory) and private sectors.

Youth Information, Advice and Counselling Services (YIACS) – Most YIACS have charitable status and provide services to young people on a range of issues, a key feature associated with YIACS is the provision of holistic, young person centred support provided under one roof.

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Article
Publication date: 9 December 2011

Shahid Islam

This research paper aims to examine the mental health needs of young adults and to discuss how well these are met from the vantage‐point of the patients. Young adulthood…

Abstract

Purpose

This research paper aims to examine the mental health needs of young adults and to discuss how well these are met from the vantage‐point of the patients. Young adulthood is identified as an epidemiological risk for developing mental health problems and so the care provided during these developmental years is investigated to assess efficacy and experience.

Design/methodology/approach

After interviewing 35 young adults, it was found most people are aware of the genesis to their problems and have strong views about the level of support and types of treatments offered.

Findings

Like other writings, this research finds that many of the needs presented by young adults are unique to this transitional phase in life and administratively determined age structures on which current mental health care is configured do not adequately meet these needs.

Research limitations/implications

The small sample size (35) and the geographical region covered means caution should be exercised in drawing any generalisations. Further research on outcomes after the mid‐20s by reflecting on service experience during the 18‐25 transformational years would be a useful area for exploration.

Practical implications

This paper makes some powerful recommendations on why service provision must meet service user needs and how the recent equality legislation may provide impetus to this. All of this needs to start with examining the age boundaries on which mental healthcare is designed.

Originality/value

This work complements the existing literature in this field by giving a voice to the subjects of this research.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2019

Jonathan Glazzard

Supporting the mental health of children and young people is a global priority. The issue is not specific to England. However, evidence suggests that one in ten children…

Abstract

Purpose

Supporting the mental health of children and young people is a global priority. The issue is not specific to England. However, evidence suggests that one in ten children and young people in England has a mental health need. This represents approximately three students in every classroom. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the role of schools in supporting children and young people’s mental health. Whilst the paper acknowledges that teachers are not trained health professionals, it is argued that a whole-school approach to mental health can support individuals in schools to remain mentally healthy. The elements of a whole-school approach are identified and discussed and some of the challenges in relation to implementation are considered. Critical to the development of a whole-school approach is the commitment from the school leadership team to promoting student and staff wellbeing.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a policy paper not an empirical study.

Findings

This paper has outlined the policy context in the UK in relation to children and young people’s mental health. It has addressed the risk and protective factors which can cause or mitigate against mental ill health and it has outlined the elements of a whole-school approach to mental health.

Originality/value

This paper explores the contribution that schools can make to supporting students’ mental health. There is limited research which addresses mental health in young people from a non-therapeutic angle.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 December 2015

Anna Jack, Caroline Lanskey and Joel Harvey

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relevance of young people ' s experiences of mental health interventions with Child and Adolescent Mental Health

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relevance of young people ' s experiences of mental health interventions with Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) before and during their time with youth offending services.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative interpretive study involved 14 interviews with young people who had offended, five of their carers and five CAMHS professionals from one local authority.

Findings

The paper identifies understanding, recognition, respect and trust as key principles in the practitioner-young person relationship, and in the intervention process more broadly, and suggests that systematic consultation with young people and their caregivers about their experience of mental health interventions would be beneficial. It notes important similarities and differences in the views of the different parties which shed further light on reasons why a young person may or may not engage with mental health services.

Research limitations/implications

The study is based on a small sample of young people from one service, but it is hoped that the findings will be a useful springboard for other services to reflect upon.

Practical implications

The paper proposes the importance of recognising young people ' s agency in the intervention process and the value of systematic consultation with young people and their caregivers for securing their engagement in interventions.

Originality/value

The study takes a multi-perspective approach (of young people, their carers and practitioners) to capture the synergies and tensions in the expectations of and interactions between young people, practitioners and caregivers.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Jessica Louise Arnold and Charley Baker

Adolescent mental health issues are on the increase, in particular depression, which is now a major public health concern globally. Mental health education is important and

Abstract

Purpose

Adolescent mental health issues are on the increase, in particular depression, which is now a major public health concern globally. Mental health education is important and young people’s awareness of mental health is potentially limited. This is one factor that creates barriers to seeking support. School nurses and educational professionals recognise that they do not necessarily have the required skill base to support emotional health concerns with young people. The purpose of this paper is to synthesise qualitative evidence related to the nurse’s role in supporting adolescents.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review using a systematic approach was undertaken, predominantly through collection of primary qualitative research studies. In total, 22 published studies are included in this review, extracted from four databases – CINAHL, Embase, Medline and Scopus.

Findings

This review shows that awareness of mental health is needed early in adolescence, while at school, to encourage young people to access support and have knowledge of their own emotional health. The need for further mental health education and provision is asserted.

Practical implications

Young people benefit from someone who is accessible and familiar to them in schools so that they can access emotional support as and when needed. Careful involvement of families (including extended families) is noted. It is proposed that this role should be a mental health nurse role, who should be accessible within the school environment.

Originality/value

This paper is original and adds to existing knowledge that mental health challenges are increasing, and more needs to be done in schools to promote mental health and reduce the stigma associated with seeking support.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

Zarrina Kurtz and Cathy Street

Research has highlighted problems in accessing mental health services for people from minority ethnic groups. Much of this literature is focused on adults. The Minority…

Abstract

Research has highlighted problems in accessing mental health services for people from minority ethnic groups. Much of this literature is focused on adults. The Minority Voices study aimed to identify and describe the perceptions and use of mental health services from the viewpoint of black and minority ethnic (BME) young people aged between 12 and 25 in England and Wales, and to examine initiatives designed to improve the access to, and acceptability of, services for these young people. It used a mixed methods approach, including a literature review, national service mapping, in‐depth interviews and focus groups in four sample areas and action research in preparing materials designed by BME young people. A number of issues that impede access to services, and that are specific to them, were identified and explored with young people from BME groups. These include concerns related to discrimination and racism, confidentiality, family and community pressures, uncertainty about any help they may receive, and marked fears of the stigma that surrounds mental health difficulties. Within services, a lack of capacity of targeted services and of cultural competence were highlighted. The research concluded that there is a need to improve awareness of mental health and information about services among BME communities, and for child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) to work with these communities to explore ways in which acceptable and appropriate mental health expertise can be made more readily available through both informal and mainstream provision.

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2008

Steven Walker

This paper describes and discusses the evaluation of an innovative child and adolescent mental health project located in a large county in eastern England. The project was…

Abstract

This paper describes and discusses the evaluation of an innovative child and adolescent mental health project located in a large county in eastern England. The project was one of eight located in the voluntary sector and supported by the Mental Health Foundation as part of a national initiative aimed at responding in new, accessible ways to young people requiring help for emotional and mental health problems. Traditional specialist CAMH services are overwhelmed by demand while also failing to engage many young people. This study provides evidence of how new services can develop to meet the needs of troubled young people in appropriate and acceptable ways.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

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