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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2009

Patience Seebohm, Alison Gilchrist and David Morris

It is obvious to many, but unproven to others, that community development has a positive impact on the mental health and well‐being of those who are touched by it. In our…

Abstract

It is obvious to many, but unproven to others, that community development has a positive impact on the mental health and well‐being of those who are touched by it. In our recent study, Connect and Include (Seebohm & Gilchrist, 2008), we found strong evidence that individuals, groups and communities can benefit from the community development process. Positive outcomes included greater democracy and social justice, but in this article we focus on the contribution of community development to social inclusion and the benefits to mental health.

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A Life in the Day, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-6282

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2010

Peter Gilbert and Michael Clark

English governance has repeatedly had a tendency to veer between national, regional and local centres of power and influence. This has often led to profound disagreements…

Abstract

English governance has repeatedly had a tendency to veer between national, regional and local centres of power and influence. This has often led to profound disagreements, sometimes even open conflict. National policy guidance is usually helpful, if developed through consultation, to steer a clear, coherent direction for the system. But a narrow, excessively top‐down, mechanistic target‐driven approach can lead to a prevailing culture of ticking boxes at the expense of real patient priorities. Government ministers and civil servants, however, are often caught in a tension between being too dogmatic, or alternatively too flexible and giving responsibility to local agencies, whereupon people may complain about a ‘postcode lottery’ in services. Balancing perspectives and narratives in a coherent way for policy development and implementation and service improvement is a major challenge of leadership. The creation of the National Institute for Mental Health in England (NIMHE) was designed to bring together the local, regional and the national in a form that would see policy and practice mutually developed and nurtured at all levels of governance.

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International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Julian N. Trollor, Claire Eagleson, Janelle Weise and Roderick McKay

The purpose of this paper is to describe and critique the methodology used to develop a core competency framework for mental health professionals working with people with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe and critique the methodology used to develop a core competency framework for mental health professionals working with people with an intellectual disability and co-occurring mental ill health.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi-phase, multi-method design was used to collect qualitative and quantitative data, including a scoping survey, modified online Delphi, and consultation with multiple stakeholders. The implementation phase involved a launch forum and workshop, toolkit development, and evaluation strategy.

Findings

Results from the scoping survey and consultation process informed the development of a core competency framework with 11 domains. An accompanying toolkit was also developed with practical guidance to assist with the implementation of the core competencies. In total, 93 professionals attended the launch forum, and the framework has been downloaded 998 times during the first year it has been available.

Research limitations/implications

Detailed information specific to each profession cannot be included when a whole of workforce approach is used. The ways in which to use the framework in conjunction with other core competency frameworks is discussed.

Practical implications

This framework can be utilised by mental health workers including clinicians, managers, service developers, and educators, from multiple professional backgrounds. The approach taken can also be used by others to develop similar frameworks.

Originality/value

This is the first core competency framework, to the authors’ knowledge, specifically designed for public mental health professionals from varied backgrounds working with people with an intellectual disability. Consulting with multiple stakeholders, not just experts, elicited new information that may otherwise have been overlooked.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2017

Chris Gibbs, Barbara Murphy, Deepika Ratnaike, Kate Hoppe and Harry Lovelock

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and experience of the Mental Health Professionals’ Network (MHPN) in building and supporting a national…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and experience of the Mental Health Professionals’ Network (MHPN) in building and supporting a national interdisciplinary professional development platform in community mental health to enhance practitioner response to the needs of consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

The key components of the MHPN model are described highlighting effective ways of engaging practitioners and supporting interdisciplinary practice. The MHPN has two key programs – Face-to-Face Interdisciplinary Practitioner Networks and an Online Professional Development Program.

Findings

The MHPN model has had significant uptake in communities across Australia and continues to grow. Practitioners report positive outcomes in engaging with other practitioners, improving their professional knowledge and having gained increased confidence in the provision of mental health care to patients.

Practical implications

The progress and learnings to date offer some useful insights that can be applied to other settings to support integrated care for patients with mental health problems through enhancing collaborative care among practitioners at the primary care level.

Originality/value

MHPN is a unique, national, successful platform delivering opportunities for interdisciplinary professional development in the primary mental health sector. The model is cost effective, practitioner driven, and transferable to other settings.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 21 May 2010

Rose Sones, Carol Hopkins, Spero Manson, Ray Watson, Mason Durie and Valerie Naquin

Indigenous populations and communities around the world confront historical, cultural, socioeconomic and forced geographic limitations that have profound impacts on mental

Abstract

Indigenous populations and communities around the world confront historical, cultural, socioeconomic and forced geographic limitations that have profound impacts on mental wellness. The impacts of colonialism and, for some indigenous populations, forced residential schooling and the resulting loss of culture and family ties, have contributed to higher risks of mental illness in these groups. In addition, there are barriers to healing and mental wellness, including inconsistent cultural competence of mainstream mental health professionals, coupled with the limited numbers of indigenous mental health professionals. The Wharerata Declaration is a proposed framework to improve indigenous mental health through state‐supported development of indigenous mental health leaders, based on a new indigenous leadership framework. Developed by the Wharerata Group (original membership noted in the acknowledgements section at the end of this article), the framework will be presented for support to the member countries of the International Initiative for Mental Health Leadership (IIMHL) in 2010.

Details

International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2012

Michelle Funk, Natalie Drew and Martin Knapp

This paper, which builds on the findings of WHO's Report on Mental Health and Development, aims to highlight the health, social, economic, and human rights effects of…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper, which builds on the findings of WHO's Report on Mental Health and Development, aims to highlight the health, social, economic, and human rights effects of unaddressed mental disorders in low and middle income countries (LMICs) and to propose effective strategies to address mental disorders and their impacts as part of an overall development strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper first reviews the findings of relevant research on mental disorders and poverty and then proposes solutions that can be adopted by countries to promote development.

Findings

This evidence of strong links between poverty and mental disorder supports the argument that mental disorders should be an important concern for development strategies. Mental disorders have diverse and far‐reaching social impacts, including homelessness, higher rates of imprisonment, poor educational opportunities and outcomes, lack of employment and reduced income. Targeted poverty alleviation programmes are needed to break the cycle between mental illness and poverty. These must include measures specifically addressing the needs of people with mental health conditions, such as the provision of accessible and effective services and support, facilitation of education, employment opportunities and housing, and enforcement of human rights protection.

Originality/value

The paper highlights that four out of every five people suffering from mental disorders are living in LMICs. Many LMICs have identified mental health as an important issue, yet lack the finances and technical expertise to address the problem. Having mental health on the agenda of development organizations will be a critical step for overcoming the negative development consequences of mental disorders.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2007

David Rushforth, Jit Patel, Alison James and Siobhan Chadwick

The scale of current demand on primary care services from people seeking help with common mental health problems places enormous pressure on the existing front line…

Abstract

The scale of current demand on primary care services from people seeking help with common mental health problems places enormous pressure on the existing front line workers in general practice. The paucity of training opportunities and competing pressures to deliver improved services across a range of general practice targets remains a major challenge for primary care professionals. The impact of government policy, to improve both access to and choice of treatments, has raised public expectations.The commissioning of the graduate workforce, the graduate worker in primary care mental health (GWPCMH), commenced in 2002, in response to the publication of target numbers detailed in the Priorities and Planning Framework, (DoH, 2002). It signalled a determination to expand the workforce provision and improve the quality of care for service users with common mental health problems.This paper examines the scale of common mental health problems, the policy response and the commissioning process. Particular attention is given to examining the barriers that have been shown to affect implementation, identifying the key influencers and the resources required to train these workers.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Book part
Publication date: 10 December 2016

William J. Penson, Kate Karban, Sarah Patrick, Bryony C. L. Walker, Rosemary Ng’andu, Annel Chishimba Bowa and Edward Mbewe

Between 2008 and 2011 academic teaching staff from Leeds Beckett University (UK) and Chainama Hills College of Health Sciences (Zambia) worked together on a Development

Abstract

Between 2008 and 2011 academic teaching staff from Leeds Beckett University (UK) and Chainama Hills College of Health Sciences (Zambia) worked together on a Development Partnership in Higher Education (DelPHe) project funded by the Department for International Development (DFID) via the British Council. The partnership focused on “up-scaling” the provision of mental health education which was intended to build capacity through the delivery of a range of workshops for health educators at Chainama College, Lusaka. The project was evaluated on completion using small focus group discussions (FGDs), so educators could feedback on their experience of the workshops and discuss the impact of learning into their teaching practice. This chapter discusses the challenges of scaling up the mental health workforce in Zambia; the rationale for the content and delivery style of workshops with the health educators and finally presents and critically discusses the evaluation findings.

Details

University Partnerships for International Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-301-6

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Book part
Publication date: 24 November 2010

Miriam Matteson

This qualitative study investigated how small group communication influences the development of shared mental models in a committee of public librarians addressing a…

Abstract

This qualitative study investigated how small group communication influences the development of shared mental models in a committee of public librarians addressing a problem-solving task. It examines the influence of communication themes, functions, roles, and rules on the group's development of shared mental models about the task and about team interaction. Data were collected over the course of a year from group meetings, email messages, group documents, and participant interviews and then analyzed using existing coding schemes and qualitative coding techniques. The findings indicate that within the group there was a strong superficial convergence around the task mental model and the team interaction mental model but a weaker convergence at a deeper level. Analysis of the group communication data shows that the group focused discussion on understanding the problem and identifying tasks, enacting group roles and rules that facilitated sharing information. The functions of their messages focused on task communication. The findings suggest that, in this group, communication themes most heavily influenced the development of a shared mental model about the task, while communication roles, rules, and functions were more influential toward the development of a shared mental model about team interaction. Implications for practice include adopting intentional tactics for surfacing mental models at various points in the group life and anchoring the emerging model within the collective cognition of the group through devices such as narratives, objects, or documentary materials.

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-287-7

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Article
Publication date: 2 April 2010

Federica Marino‐Francis and Anne Worrall‐Davies

The concept of social inclusion features prominently in current policy and practice developments in mental health services. The Social Exclusion Unit (2006) highlighted…

Abstract

The concept of social inclusion features prominently in current policy and practice developments in mental health services. The Social Exclusion Unit (2006) highlighted the need for mental health day services to promote inclusion and participation, by integrating with the wider community, and by supporting and encouraging users to access opportunities in the local community. The Leeds i3 (inspire, improve, include) project aimed to modernise local mental health day services accordingly. The aim of our study was to develop and validate a measure of social inclusion to be used in mental health day services in Leeds. The underlying assumption was that recent changes in mental health day service provision would substantially improve social inclusion of the service users.The social inclusion questionnaire was developed through extensive iterative consultation with mental health service users and staff, and its reliability was proven using test‐retest statistics. It was shown to be a simple, inexpensive, user‐friendly and repeatable measure that could be used routinely by mental health day services. Factor analysis of the questionnaire showed that social inclusion had seven important components. We suggest that these components form a useful basis for discussion with service users, as well as for planning and evaluating services.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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