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Article
Publication date: 19 April 2013

Dan Kirk, Gabriele Oettingen and Peter M. Gollwitzer

The present experiment aimed to test the impact of a self‐regulatory strategy of goal pursuit – called mental contrasting with implementation intentions (MCII) – on an…

Abstract

Purpose

The present experiment aimed to test the impact of a self‐regulatory strategy of goal pursuit – called mental contrasting with implementation intentions (MCII) – on an integrative bargaining task.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were randomly assigned to dyads and negotiated over the sale of a car. Before negotiating, participants were prompted to engage in MCII, or one or the other of its two component strategies: to contrast mentally achieving success in the integrative bargaining task with the reality standing in the way of this success (MC), to form implementation intentions on how to bargain (i.e. if‐then plans) (II), or both to contrast mentally and form implementation intentions (MCII).

Findings

The strategy of mental contrasting with implementation intentions led dyads to reach the largest joint agreements, compared to dyads that only used mental contrasting or if‐then plans. Moreover, participants who mentally contrasted formed more cooperative implementation intentions than participants who did not mentally contrast, mediating the effect of condition on joint gain.

Research limitations/implications

The findings suggest that the self‐regulatory strategy of mental contrasting with implementation intentions (MCII) leads to higher joint gain, and that this effect is mediated by mental contrasting's promotion of cooperative planning. More research should be done to understand the specific negotiation behaviors engendered by MCII, as well as its applicability to other negotiation scenarios.

Originality/value

These findings have implications for both self‐regulation and negotiation research. The result that MCII fosters integrative solutions reflects its potential to help people form cooperative plans and reach high joint‐value agreements in integrative scenarios. For negotiation research, the paper identifies an effective self‐regulatory strategy for producing high‐quality agreements.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2011

Dan Kirk, Gabriele Oettingen and Peter M. Gollwitzer

This paper aims to test the impact of several self‐regulatory strategies on an integrative bargaining task.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to test the impact of several self‐regulatory strategies on an integrative bargaining task.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were randomly assigned to dyads and negotiated over the sale of a car. Before negotiating, participants were prompted to engage in one of three self‐regulation strategies, based upon fantasy realization theory (FRT): to mentally contrast a successful future agreement with the reality of bargaining, to exclusively elaborate on successful future agreement, or to exclusively elaborate on the reality of bargaining. Those in the control condition merely began the negotiation.

Findings

Mentally contrasting a successful future agreement with the reality of bargaining leads dyads to reach the largest and most equitable joint agreements, compared to dyads that elaborate only on successful future agreement, or on the reality of bargaining.

Research limitations/implications

Since it was found that mental contrasting promotes integrative agreement, it is important to learn more about the psychological processes that mediate and moderate this effect. Another related line of research would examine the application of the findings to other bargaining scenarios. One further future line of research should combine mental contrasting with planning strategies.

Originality/value

The findings of the paper have implications for both self‐regulation and negotiation research. The result that mental contrasting fosters integrative solutions reflects its potential to help negotiators effectively discriminate among feasible and unfeasible components of a multi‐faceted goal (integrative agreement). For negotiation research, the paper identifies an effective self‐regulatory strategy for producing high‐quality agreements.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

Sandy Herron and Rebecca Mortimer

The literature reflects a contested view of the concept ‘mental health’. What we ‘know about’ mental health can be translated within the definitions, models, elements of…

Abstract

The literature reflects a contested view of the concept ‘mental health’. What we ‘know about’ mental health can be translated within the definitions, models, elements of and criteria for mental health and in the language used to discuss ‘mental health’ itself. Although these differing ways of knowing about mental health do not exist in isolation from one another, they can offer a clear, systematic and logical approach to reviewing the concept ‘mental health’. This makes it clear, however, that there is no common consensus as to what is meant by ‘mental health’. The aim of this paper is to present an overview of these different ways of knowing about mental health and to discuss critically the implications of having a contested concept.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 19 February 2018

Andrew Stott and Helena Priest

Existing literature has examined what recovery means to people with co-occurring difficulties, but does little to examine experiences of recovery as a process. The purpose…

Abstract

Purpose

Existing literature has examined what recovery means to people with co-occurring difficulties, but does little to examine experiences of recovery as a process. The purpose of this paper is to use a narrative approach to explore the process of recovery as an individual journey in a social context. It focuses on people who use alcohol in order to explore the impact of alcohol’s specific cultural meanings on the recovery journey.

Design/methodology/approach

Ten interviews with people with coexisting mental health and alcohol misuse difficulties were conducted, audio-recorded, and transcribed. The transcriptions were analysed using narrative analysis.

Findings

Most participants’ narratives shared a three-part structure, from a traumatic past, through an episode of change, to an ongoing recovery phase. Change and recovery were attributed to several factors including flexible and practical support from services, therapeutic relationships with key professionals, and peer support. Some participants redefined themselves and their alcohol use in relation to ideas of what it is to be “normal”.

Research limitations/implications

The research excluded people who recover outside of services, replicating a shortcoming of much research in this area.

Practical implications

The value placed on professionals having specialised therapeutic skills in working with trauma highlights the need for training in this area. The role for practical and material support underlines the importance of multi-agency working.

Originality/value

The narrative methodology enables the study to draw links between personal stories of recovery and wider social influences, allowing comment on the implications for services. Further, the experiences of people with coexisting mental health and alcohol misuse difficulties have rarely been studied apart from the dual diagnosis population in general, so this paper is able to investigate the specific challenges for this population.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2014

Joanne Mueller, Margie M. Callanan and Kathryn Greenwood

Stigma around mental health problems is known to emerge in middle childhood and persist into adulthood, yet almost nothing is known about the role of parents in this…

Abstract

Purpose

Stigma around mental health problems is known to emerge in middle childhood and persist into adulthood, yet almost nothing is known about the role of parents in this process. This paper aims to develop a model of parental communication to primary school-aged children around mental health and ill-health, to increase understanding about how stigma develops.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were performed with ten UK-based parents of children aged 7-11 years. Analysis followed an exploratory grounded theory approach, incorporating quality assurance checks.

Findings

Parents’ communications are governed by the extent to which they view a particular issue as related to “Them” (mental ill-health) or to “Us” (mental health). In contrast to communication about “Us”, parental communication about mental “illness” is characterized by avoidance and contradiction, and driven by largely unconscious processes of taboo and stigma.

Originality/value

This study was the first to explore parents’ communications to their 7-11 year old children about mental health and mental illness, and proposes a preliminary theoretical model that may offer insight into the development of stigma in childhood and the intergenerational transmission of stigmatized attitudes.

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2007

Sibylle Georgianna

This paper seeks to address the question: what is the relationship of culture to self‐leadership?

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to address the question: what is the relationship of culture to self‐leadership?

Design/methodology/approach

In an exploratory study, 74 US and 44 Chinese undergraduates rated their cultural beliefs and self‐leadership strategies. After four‐weeks in which a self‐leadership intervention was utilized, respondents contrasted positive aspects of their professional objectives with obstacles that impeded the realization of their goals.

Findings

The intervention did not influence participants' self‐leadership strategies, as measured two weeks after the intervention (p > 0.11). Repeated MANOVA measures revealed that the US group expressed higher levels of self‐leadership than the Chinese group during the three phases of the study (p < 0.001). Surprisingly, Chinese students held higher individualistic characteristics than the US group (p=0.009).

Research limitations/implications

This research provides some insight into the similarities and differences between people from different cultures as to their use of self‐leadership strategies. Further research using more robust validation methodology is warranted to confirm the measurements of the study at issue here.

Practical implications

Managers will benefit from becoming aware that individuals' cultural characteristics influence their use and development of self‐leadership strategies.

Originality/value

This study makes a significant contribution to the body of research on self‐leadership. The study provides what may be the first glimpse of the volitional and self‐awareness components of self‐leadership strategies within the native Chinese population, and provides a backdrop with a US population for contrast.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2014

Naomi Boycott, Justine Schneider and Michael Osborne

The purpose of this paper is to draw out the lessons learned from the implementation of the Individual Placement and Support (IPS) approach to supported employment in two…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to draw out the lessons learned from the implementation of the Individual Placement and Support (IPS) approach to supported employment in two contrasting adult mental health teams; one “standard” CMHT, and one early intervention in psychosis (EIP) team.

Design/methodology/approach

These inferences are based on the evidence from a four-year study of IPS in one mental health care provider in the UK, which began by setting up a new service, and went on to run a RCT looking at the impact of psychological input as an adjunct to IPS alone.

Findings

In attempting to introduce IPS to mental health teams in Nottingham the authors came across numerous barriers, including service reorganisation, funding cuts and the wider context of recession. Differences were observed between mental health teams in the willingness to embrace IPS. The authors argue that this variability is due to differences in caseload size, recovery priorities and client profiles. The authors have learnt that perseverance, strenuous efforts to engage clinical staff and the use of IPS fidelity reviews can make a positive difference to the implementation process.

Practical implications

The experience suggests that setting up an IPS service is possible even in the most challenging of times, and that EIP services may be a particularly fertile ground for this approach. The authors also discuss potential barriers to implementing new services in mental health teams.

Originality/value

This paper will be of value to service development and the science of implementation in mental health.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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Case study
Publication date: 21 May 2021

Amy Fisher Moore and Verity Hawarden

Upon completion of the case discussion, students will be able to: identify the enablers of a mental skills coaching process and the broad outcomes as a result of a…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

Upon completion of the case discussion, students will be able to: identify the enablers of a mental skills coaching process and the broad outcomes as a result of a coaching intervention; understand the contributing factors towards creating greater psychological safety in a team and the impact this has on team performance; and identify positive leadership strategies to create an environment in which meaningful work and goal achievement increase engagement.

Case overview/synopsis

Leanne Redding was the mental skills coach for Maccabi, a professional league soccer club in Johannesburg, South Africa. Redding had worked with the club’s players using mental techniques, the ultimate aim being to improve performance. Redding’s work was based on the premise of trust, lived values, self-respect and reflection. She believed that a strengths-based approach grounded in sports psychology and aligned with mental contrasting enabled resilience. Her process of holding individual and team sessions helped with sustaining motivation, overcoming limiting fears and encouraging focus on the greater good of the team. The result was Maccabi’s promotion to the professional league of soccer. However, not all of her broad stakeholder group had bought into the value of sports psychology coaching. The case explores Redding’s process and her belief of the importance and buy-in from all players of the team values which should inform behaviour. The case concludes with Redding contemplating what she should do to gain greater acceptance from the rest of the coaching staff for her work.

Complexity academic level

This case can be used in graduate and postgraduate level courses such as an MBA, in management development programmes or in short executive education courses focusing on organisational behaviour, leadership and human capital development and sports management.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 7: Management Science.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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Book part
Publication date: 5 November 2016

Richard T. Marcy and Ottilia Berze

This study investigates the complex interaction between properties of some emergent crises and the expertise of particular public sector leaders, who themselves are…

Abstract

This study investigates the complex interaction between properties of some emergent crises and the expertise of particular public sector leaders, who themselves are embedded in particular institutional processes that further constrain identification of these emergent crises. It is suggested that discrepancy in the ability of leaders to detect crises is due not only to their own proficiency in some cognitive skills, but also to their interaction with, and differences in, particular properties of some emergent crises, which render some emergent crises more detectable than others in some institutional environments.

Details

Uncertainty and Strategic Decision Making
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-170-8

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2007

Bengt Johannisson

The aim is to provide a conceptual framework that from a local perspective positions alternative ways to cope with the challenges of a globalising world.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim is to provide a conceptual framework that from a local perspective positions alternative ways to cope with the challenges of a globalising world.

Design/methodology/approach

The notion of “organising context” is introduced as an ideal setting for business and community development processes as collective entrepreneurial efforts. A 3D model proposes means of structuring contemporary public discourses on local economic development. A bridging “virtual” logic is suggested that crafts and enacts localised entrepreneurial opportunities by bridging the territorial logic and the functional logic. The practices of these three rationales are illustrated by cases on community development in the Swedish rural setting.

Findings

The globalisation of the world offers challenges to every individual, organisation and location. These contests can either be considered as openings for development or as threats which trigger defensive measures and ultimately produce lock‐ins. Local leadership and entrepreneurship define the outcome of change efforts.

Research limitations/implications

Reflections on the conceptualisation and the empirical lessons raise epistemological and ethical questions which trigger alternative methodologies for researching complex community‐development processes. Interactive approaches where researchers get hand‐on involved in ongoing events appear as appropriate.

Practical implications

The need for interactive research when enacting community development calls for a coalition between local stakeholders and researchers. By bridging local and formalised knowledge needed competencies and legitimacy for change can be created.

Originality/value

By proposing and applying a vocabulary for diagnosing and evaluating the potential for local economic development both researchers and practitioners are invited to further knowledge creation.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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