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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2021

Zhining Wang, Shuang Ren, Doren Chadee, Mengli Liu and Shaohan Cai

Although team reflexivity has been identified as a potent tool for improving organizational performance, how and when it influences individual employee innovative behavior…

Abstract

Purpose

Although team reflexivity has been identified as a potent tool for improving organizational performance, how and when it influences individual employee innovative behavior remains theoretically and conceptually underspecified. Taking a knowledge management perspective, this study aims to investigate the role of team-level knowledge sharing and leadership in transforming team reflexivity into innovative behavior at the individual level.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper follows a multilevel study design to collect data (n = 441) from 91 teams in 48 knowledge-based organizations. The paper tests our multilevel model using multinomial logistic techniques.

Findings

The overall results confirm that knowledge sharing in teams mediates the influence of team reflexivity on individual employee innovative behavior, and that leadership plays an important role in moderating these influences. Specifically, authoritarian leadership is found to attenuate the team reflexivity and knowledge sharing effect, whereas benevolent leadership is found to amplify this indirect effect.

Originality/value

The multilevel study design that explains how team-level processes translate into innovative behavior at the individual employee level is novel. Relatedly, our use of a multilevel analytical framework is also original.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 June 2020

Zhining Wang, Shaohan Cai, Mengli Liu, Dandan liu and Lijun Meng

The aim of this paper is to develop a tool measuring individual intellectual capital (IIC) and investigate the relationship between self-reflection and IIC.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to develop a tool measuring individual intellectual capital (IIC) and investigate the relationship between self-reflection and IIC.

Design/methodology/approach

This study developed a theoretical model based on social cognitive theory and the literature of self-reflection and intellectual capital (IC). This research collected responses from 502 dyads of employees and their direct supervisors in 150 firms in China, and the study tested the research model using structural equation modeling (SEM).

Findings

The results indicate that three components of self-reflection, namely, need for self-reflection, engagement in self-reflection and insight, significantly contribute to all the three components of IIC, such as individual human capital, individual structural capital and individual relational capital. The findings suggest that need for self-reflection is the weakest component to impact individual human capital and individual relationship capital, while insight is the one that mostly enhances individual structural capital.

Practical implications

This paper suggests that managers can enhance employees' IIC by facilitating their self-reflection. Managers can develop appropriate strategies based on findings of this study, to achieve their specific goals.

Originality/value

First, this study develops a tool for measuring IIC. Second, this study provides an enriched theoretical explanation on the relationship between self-reflection and IIC – by showing that the three subdimensions of self-reflection, such as need, engagement and insight, influence the three subdimensions of IIC, such as individual human capital, individual structural capital and individual relational capital.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2018

Gaohui Cao, Mengli Liang and Xuguang Li

This paper aims to clearly conceptualize the idea of the smart library and propose a holistic approach to building smart libraries, in accordance with recent practices and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to clearly conceptualize the idea of the smart library and propose a holistic approach to building smart libraries, in accordance with recent practices and state-of-the-art technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on an extensive review of existing literature and practice about library construction, this paper distinguishes between similar types of smart library and divides the concepts associated with smart library building into three dimensions: technology, service and human.

Findings

Traditional libraries can transform to smart libraries by strategic design and implementation of advanced technologies, such as cloud computing, data mining and artificial intelligence, but they also need to consider service building, user cultivation and librarian training.

Originality/value

Aligning to the three main dimensions of smart libraries (technology, service and human), this study clarifies the concept of the smart library and offers strategic principles: integration of infrastructures, construction of service and human learning. It provides guidelines and directions for public and academic libraries committed to becoming smart libraries.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2020

Mingchuan Gong, Mengli Xu, Adeel Luqman, Lingling Yu and Ayesha Masood

The phenomenon of mobile social networking site (SNS) addiction has become increasingly severe nowadays and brings adverse outcomes to users’ daily life and work…

Abstract

Purpose

The phenomenon of mobile social networking site (SNS) addiction has become increasingly severe nowadays and brings adverse outcomes to users’ daily life and work efficiency. However, there are relatively few research probes into the formation process of mobile SNS addiction behavior, and how demographic factors (e.g. gender and age) influence users’ addiction behavior. Adopting the stimulus–organism–response (S–O–R) framework, this study examines the effects of three types of technological functions (enjoyment, sociability and information value) on flow in relation to mobile SNS addiction. The authors further proposed gender and age as moderators, which play important roles in influencing the formation of mobile SNS addiction behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

This study examines the formation of mobile SNS addiction with a particular focus on the WeChat app. The authors use a field survey study conducted in China with 351 subjects of WeChat app users to examine thestudy model.

Findings

The results demonstrate that addictive behavior is determined by users’ flow states of using mobile SNS. The flow states, in turn, are influenced by three types of technological functions (enjoyment, sociability and information value). In addition, gender and age act as vital moderators in the model.

Originality/value

First, the authors empirically examine the formation of SNS addiction on the mobile device by adopting the S–O–R framework, which may enrich the addiction literature. Second, the authors reveal the moderating roles of age and gender in affecting the formation process of addiction behavior further. The findings of this research deepen our understanding of users’ addiction behavior. Third, the findings also offer rich insights to prevent mobile SNS addiction.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 49 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2020

Mengli Yu, Ronggang Zhou, Zhao Cai, Chee-Wee Tan and Huiwen Wang

This study examines the impact of response time on user experience for mobile applications and considers the moderating influence of gender and network environment on this…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the impact of response time on user experience for mobile applications and considers the moderating influence of gender and network environment on this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

An experiment was conducted with 50 young adults to evaluate their user experience of a mobile application that simulates variations in network environment and response time. User experience was evaluated based on the three constituent dimensions of tolerance, acceptance, and satisfaction.

Findings

Analytical results demonstrate that response time not only adversely affects user experience of mobile applications, but that this effect is not homogeneous across the three dimensions of tolerance, acceptance and satisfaction. The findings also illustrate that gender moderates the effect of response time on user experience, however, the negative influence is more salient for males than females, which is opposite to our hypothesis. The joint moderating influence of gender and network environment turned out to be partly significant.

Practical implications

By illuminating users' tolerance, acceptance, and satisfaction with varied response times, findings from this study can inform the design of mobile applications such that desired levels of user experience can be assured with minimum resources.

Originality/value

Although response time has been hailed as a key determinant of user experience for desktop applications, there is a paucity of studies that have investigated the impact of response time on user experience for mobile applications. Furthermore, prior research on response time neglects the multi-dimensional nature of user experience. This study bridges the above mentioned knowledge gaps by delineating user experience into its constituent dimensions and clarifying the effects of response time on each of these dimensions.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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