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Article
Publication date: 30 June 2020

Cui Stacey Li, Carol Xiaoyue Zhang, Xiaoqing Chen and Meng Shan Sharon Wu

This study aims to explore how the concept of extended self-influences luxury shopping tourism consumption among Chinese tourists. It explores why luxury shopping is…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore how the concept of extended self-influences luxury shopping tourism consumption among Chinese tourists. It explores why luxury shopping is important for Chinese tourists. Specifically, this study focuses on a strategically important emerging market segment: post-1990s female Chinese tourists.

Design/methodology/approach

To explore the link between the extended self and luxury shopping tourism consumption among post-1990s Chinese female tourists, this study adopted a qualitative and interpretive approach. A total of 22 semi-structured in-depth interviews were carried out to collect the data.

Findings

This qualitative inquiry found that luxury shopping during overseas holidays has some subtle differences from luxury shopping in China, as the conceptualisation of luxury is highly context-based. Through a focus on gender and generational differences, the current study reveals that the idea of individuality has started to influence their luxury purchases.

Practical implications

The study shows how different selves are associated with luxury shopping. It thus provides empirical evidence regarding the reasons behind their motivation, especially for shopping overseas to get a good price and an exclusive and enjoyable luxury shopping experience abroad. Also, it was found that curiosity about buying luxury products is viewed as less favoured and logical shopping will be a future trend. Individuality is becoming a trend for younger consumers.

Originality/value

Theoretically, by linking the “extended self” with luxury shopping tourism, this study provides the social-psychological aspects of luxury shopping tourism. Instead of focusing on particular destinations, this study provides compressed but also focused inquiries to explore how the concept of the self-influences post-1990s female Chinese tourists’ shopping consumption while on holiday, and how this luxury shopping experience influences their concept of the self.

目标

本文运用“延伸自我”概念对中国泳客在境外购买奢侈品的行为和意义进行探讨, 从而进一步了解中国游客对奢侈品的消费形态。 研究主要专注在中国90后女性市场, 女性市场已被许多学者以即市场营销人员认定为新兴市场领域。

设计

通过22个深度访谈的所得数据表明境外奢侈品高买行为与自我概念有着紧密的联系, 并为消费者购买动机背后的原因提供了实证

主要结论

在境外旅游过程中购买奢侈品有非常大的价格优势, 同时又能为消费者提供独特的购物体验, 中国90后女性的奢侈品购买行为日趋理性并在出行之前做好详细的购物计划, 个性的展示将成为中国年轻女性奢侈品消费的主导因素。

理论贡献

该研究的理论贡献是探索自我概念如何影响90年代后中国女性游客在境外旅行度假时的奢侈品购物行为, 以及这种奢侈品购物体验如何影响其自我概念。

关键词 购物,中国游客,女性, 延伸自我,自我概念

文章类型 研究论文

Propósito

El estudio se dedica a explorar cómo influir el conceptöauto-extensión¨ al comportamiento de comprar los artículos de lujo en el extranjero entre los chinos turísticos, también a explorar la importancia de tal caso para ellos.

Metodología

Este estudio ha adaptado un enfoque cualitativo entre 22 entrevistas en profundidad semiestructuradas para la recopilación de datos y muestra cómo se asocian diferentes seres con las compras de lujo.

Resultados

Por lo tanto, se proporciona las pruebas evidentemente sobre las razones detrás de su motivación. Comprar artículos de lujo durante los viajes al extranjero tiene una gran ventaja de precio, al tiempo que las ofrece una experiencia especial. Estos actos se están volviendo más racionales y tienen planes de compras detallados antes de viajar. La exhibición de la personalidad se convertirá en el factor dominante en cuanto al consumo de artículos de lujo por parte de tales chinas.

Originalidad

Principalmente se enfoca a un nuevo campo del mercado en lo cual los consumidores son las chicas quienes nacieron después del año 1990.

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Article
Publication date: 31 October 2018

Cheng-Hao Steve Chen, Meng-Shan Sharon Wu, Bang Nguyen and Stacey Li

The purpose of this study is to provide insights into value creation within a newspaper consumption community, adding to current information research by demonstrating how…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to provide insights into value creation within a newspaper consumption community, adding to current information research by demonstrating how an atypical consumption community can co-create value in ways different from those identified in extant research. The upheaval of the newspaper industry’s business model and value chain in the face of digitalisation has led to significant decreases in newspaper revenue. To stay successful in the modern digital climate, it is essential for newspapers to utilise the interactive features of Web 2.0 to find new value sources. To do so, it is necessary to focus not just on tangible financial value but also symbolic value. The study supports the notion that consumers collectively co-create value through consumption community practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Through the conduction of a netnographic exploration of active consumers on the Guardian website and interviews with passive consumers, the study’s aims of understanding co-creation in digitally facilitated newspaper consumption environment were achieved.

Findings

The findings have opened up new ways in which newspapers can harness value through consumption communities as well as suggesting the future scope of research. This study indicates that newspapers foster an atypical environment for the creation of a cohesive consumption community – something that has failed to be appreciated in extant information research – because their diverse content influences the formation of multiple community pools with members who do not always share the same beliefs. In addition, the study reveals that the Guardian’s online consumption community co-creates value without strict adherence to the prescribed contingencies set out in current literature. The findings uncover new patterns in community behaviour proving value to be created not just through their co-consumption but also through individual consumption.

Originality/value

This study contributes to discussions on how communities co-create value and how this differs with different article subjects (lifestyle and political and types of participants, both active and passive).

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2019

Gordon Liu, Meng-Shan Sharon Wu, Wai Wai Ko, Cheng-Hao Steve Chen and Yantai Chen

Cause-related marketing (CRM) focuses on the use of marketing tools to publicize a firm’s corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities. Drawing on legitimacy theory…

Abstract

Purpose

Cause-related marketing (CRM) focuses on the use of marketing tools to publicize a firm’s corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities. Drawing on legitimacy theory, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of CRM-led CSR in international business-to-business (B2B) markets. In particular, the authors examine the relationship between supplier CRM-led philanthropic CSR reputation and foreign customer business engagement in an international B2B setting. The authors also test how the foreign customer’s host-country sustainable development level moderates this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collect and analyze dyadic data from multiple sources including: dyadic data from a supplier and its 90 foreign customers; the supplier’s internal company records; and publically available data.

Findings

The authors find that supplier CRM-led philanthropic CSR reputation positively affects foreign customer business engagement. Furthermore, the authors find that this positive relationship is stronger when host-country environments are characterized by achieving higher level of environmental well-being development. In contrast, this positive relationship is weaker when the foreign customer host-country environment is characterized by achieving higher level of economic well-being development.

Originality/value

The authors examine that impacts of CRM-led CSR in international B2B markets and differentiate the contingent roles of foreign customer host-country sustainable development in moderating such impacts.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2015

Meng-Shan Sharon Wu, Cheng-Hao Steve Chen and Bang Nguyen

It is generally agreed that marketing campaigns developed for western markets may not be appropriate for consumers living in eastern cultures, particularly with respect to…

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Abstract

Purpose

It is generally agreed that marketing campaigns developed for western markets may not be appropriate for consumers living in eastern cultures, particularly with respect to strategies for promoting luxury brands. While consultancy reports and media commentaries show that rising levels of disposable income are driving increasing demand for luxury goods in China and Taiwan, for example, the academic literature offers very few consumer research findings clearly elucidating the different luxury purchasing behaviour of eastern and western consumers. The purpose of this paper is to compare the consumption of luxury products and luxury fashion purchasing habits in Taiwan and the UK, with particular reference to the fashion sector, focusing on a strategically important emerging market segment: young consumers of luxury brands.

Design/methodology/approach

To achieve the study’s objectives, questionnaires were administered online in each of the two countries to females aged 18-26 years, who had made more than two luxury purchases in the year preceding the survey. Employing a two-wave survey, respondents were selected via social media and personal contacts in the UK and by means of snowball sampling in Taiwan.

Findings

The study found one major point of difference among many similarities: the Taiwanese buyers scored significantly higher on indicators that they were treating luxury brands as a means of developing their self-identity and communicating their social standing: an important part of maintaining “face” in Asian cultures. These findings contain important strategic implications for luxury fashion brand managers developing marketing campaigns for the promotion of their brands in the distinctive cultures of Taiwan, Mainland China and their neighbours.

Originality/value

The study reported in this paper compares the consumption of luxury products in Taiwan and the UK, with particular reference to the fashion sector. The study contributes to existing knowledge by evaluating differences and similarities in: first, the luxury fashion purchasing behaviour of young women in Taiwan and the UK; and second, the ways in which the two sets of consumers use luxury fashion products as an extension of their selves.

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

Meng-Shan Sharon Wu, Isabella Chaney, Cheng-Hao Steve Chen, Bang Nguyen and T.C. Melewar

This paper offers insights into the consumption motives and purchasing behaviour of that market segment in Taiwan against the background of increasing consumption of…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper offers insights into the consumption motives and purchasing behaviour of that market segment in Taiwan against the background of increasing consumption of luxury fashion brands by young female consumers in Asian countries.

Design/methodology/approach

Analysis of data collected using face-to-face semi-structured interviews with 23 fashion-conscious females aged 18-32 years was completed and new empirical insights are offered.

Findings

The study found a high level of involvement in the world of luxury fashion retailing. Asian consumers devoured media commentary, drew inspiration from female celebrities and treated information-seeking and discussion of luxury fashion brands with friends as a serious and enjoyable pursuit. The social status conferred by expensive fashion wear motivated them to spend on luxury brands even if their discretionary income was limited. Potential guilt in so doing was assuaged by rationalising that the quality was good and the purchase would be long lasting. Marketers targeting this valuable segment should communicate appeals to an aspirational lifestyle in traditional and social media, effective at reaching young women.

Originality/value

The study reported in this paper contributes to the limited published research into the luxury-marketing sector in Asia by examining the buying behaviour of female Strawberry Generation consumers in Taiwan. It is the first to research and investigate the meanings attached to luxury by these individuals in the collectivist culture of Taiwan, as well as their motivations, and the factors influencing their purchase of luxury fashions. The study thus contributes with new knowledge to the buying of luxury fashion products by young female Taiwanese consumers, which may be extended to other collectivist cultures in Asia.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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